Super Replay – Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon (Part Two)

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Super Replay – Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon (Part Two)

A few months ago I emerged as the victor of Game Informer's most recent Super Replay Showdown. My prize? Subjecting my fellow editors and our viewers to the strange and maddening FMV adventure game that is Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon. Starring a bumbling private eye who spends his weeks trying to make rent and ends up going on a quest to prevent the end of the world, Under A Killing Moon is a peculiar mishmash of genres, the kind of game that could have only been birthed in the early '90s.

It's pure, undistilled zaniness that has to been seen to be believed. So sit back in your chair and push the Maltese falcon on your desk out of the way of the screen so you can join me, Andrew Reiner, Dan Tack, and Kyle Hilliard as we navigate this twisted, futuristic vision of San Francisco, putting our flimsy detective skills to use while being constantly berated by James Earl Jones.

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Comixology Unlimited – Is It Worth It?

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Comixology Unlimited was an inevitability. The writing has been on the wall for some time. Movies and TV programming are already in full swing with on-demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Hulu. And Marvel has pioneered the approach in the comic sphere with its successful Marvel Unlimited service, which offers thousands of comics from the company’s backlog. 

Comixology Unlmited is the logical next step in comic consumption for at least some, offering a cheap alternative for a select type of comic reader. It won’t be for everyone, but the range of available titles will be a big selling point for many. We took the new service for a spin. Here are the big things you need to know to decide if it’s for you.

Comixology Unlimited requires an existing Comixology account, but you can also use your Amazon login to set up your account, and all your Amazon payment info is already present without any fuss. Visit Comixology’s website, and the Unlimited button is going to be easy to find, especially right now as the platform is launching.

65daysofstatic On Creating No Man's Sky's Generative Soundtrack

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No Man's Sky saw a delay recently pushing the game back from its original June 21 release date to August 9. Its soundtrack, however, is still set for a June 17 release. The game's music is being created by band 65daysofstatic, who we spoke to when No Man's Sky was on our cover back in December of 2104. Ahead of the release of the game's soundtrack, which you can get here, we spoke with 65daysofstatic's Paul Wolinski, who plays piano, guitar, and also programs for the band about what has changed since last time we spoke, and what it's like to create music for one of the most anticipated games of the last few years.

The Sports Desk – What Is The Offseason For?

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The Sports Desk – What Is The Offseason For?

Welcome to Game Informer's Sports Desk – our weekly column covering the world of video game sports.

Of course, all our normal reviews, previews, and news stories will still be front and center on the website, but this is a chance to dive deeper, ask more questions, and explore a multitude of topics of all the sports video games out there. That includes some games we don't normally cover.

Sometimes the column will be an opinion or a hands-on of a recent DLC. Other times I'll put up a developer interview, tutorial, or a feature on a game that's already been out but deserves another look.

The Black Watchmen Is A Game That Bleeds Into Your Real Life

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The Black Watchmen Is A Game That Bleeds Into Your Real Life

Back in 2001, I played an EA-published game called Majestic. It was unlike anything I had ever played, as the story was told via cryptic phone calls to my cell phone, AOL Instant Messenger bots, and unsolicited faxes.

Ever since its untimely demise, I’ve often hoped someone would bring the concept back. The alternate reality game (ARG) genre spun off in a different direction, becoming a marketing tool with experiences like Halo 2’s ilovebees and The Dark Knight’s Why So Serious (both developed and executed by 42 Entertainment).

Alice & Smith’s The Black Watchmen re-centers the genre, making the game the point instead of simply a vehicle for promoting something else. The game, which is currently the only ARG sold on Steam, began as a tie-in with Funcom’s MMO, The Secret World, but has become its own entity. The company is largely business-to-business, offering work for hire and services to game developers.

Game Informer's Ultimate Blurry Box Art Challenge

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Game Informer's Ultimate Blurry Box Art Challenge

You might think you're a video game Einstein, but prepare to have your video game knowledge tested like never before in this ultimate box art quiz.

We've taken some of the most popular video game box art and blured out the titles. Can you use your expert gaming knowledge to discern their real titles?

Highlight the black box for the answer: Destiny

The Right (And Wrong) Ways To Make A Remaster

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In just a few years, remastered games have become a fixture of the gaming landscape. What started with a few experimental releases has given rise to a massive audience hungry to play older games on newer hardware. Remasters are a great way to help gaming history live on, but reproducing the past isn’t enough. These titles should go above and beyond to entice new players and satisfy old fans. However, the development community doesn’t have a consistent approach to making remasters worthwhile. Ultimately, it boils down to giving gamers an improved experience and good value, but hitting that mark is not as simple as it seems. This list runs through the things we want – and don’t want – in our remastered games.

DO: Create New Content Creating brand new content is the single most effective way to make remasters more attractive. Many players interested in remasters are returning fans, and giving them a reason to buy a game again (beyond basic nostalgia) is critical. The whole game doesn’t need to be redesigned, but adding new modes, cutscenes, playable characters, and control methods can make an old game feel new again. Granted, this requires more work, since it goes beyond simply polishing the original product, but gamers appreciate the ability to experiment with something familiar.

Is It Really Time For More Gaming Haiku From The Master? Sure, Why Not

about X hours ago from
Is It Really Time For More Gaming Haiku From The Master? Sure, Why Not

Every once in a while, I like to take out my quill, dip it into an inkwell, and document the last 10 games that I've played – in haiku form, of course. Guess what? It's that time again!

I've been on a bit of an Uncharted bender these days, frantically trying to catch up with the series while Uncharted 4 is still relevant. Don't worry, though, I also played games that are sure to strike a chord with most gamers, including a mobile free-to-play RTS, some licensed garbage, and Diablo III. Of course.

Once you've fully savored my latest batch of verse, you may want more. Don't worry, you can read all my previous entries here, here, herehere, here, and here. And as always, you're welcome.

Here Are Some Crazy Bugs We Ran Into While Playing Homefront: The Revolution

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Homefront: The Revolution came out two weeks ago, and unfortunately, it's not great. While I appreciated some of the novel ideas the sequel introduces, a wealth of bugs and performance problems made taking back Philadelphia an unenjoyable slog. If you're looking for a better idea of what players are up against, or just want to laugh at some pretty severe glitch videos, I've put together a collection of gameplay clips from my time with the game.

All videos were taken from the PS4 version of the game.

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Top Of The Table – The Other Half Of The Gaming Hobby

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Top Of The Table – The Other Half Of The Gaming Hobby

Growing up, I loved any video game rooted in my favorite genre of fantasy. I would rent and buy all the video games with a passing relation to dragons and wizards, regardless of quality. Like many of you, as my taste in games grew, I began to recognize how much I was limiting my own fun. While I never lost a love of classic fantasy tropes, a whole world of other video games beckoned, inviting me into other interactive settings of action, mystery, horror, science-fiction, sports, racing, puzzles, and more. Why had I spent so long with an artificial barrier that kept me from such great entertainment? 

In the back of my head, that’s always the memory that comes to mind when I hear that someone loves video games, but has never dipped their toe into the other half of the gaming hobby that lives on your home tabletop. It feels like declaring that you love Italian food, but for some reason you just don’t want to try Mexican cuisine. Sure, some people just don’t like guacamole, but how would you know until you try?