A Guide To Sneaking Through Prey (Relatively) Unscathed

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A Guide To Sneaking Through Prey (Relatively) Unscathed

Welcome to Talos-1! This sprawling space station orbiting the Earth’s moon operates on the cutting edge of bioscience. The state-of-the-art laboratories and Neo Deco aesthetics are a sight to behold in those brief moments between dangerous encounters with the Typhon alien threat. 

The mimics, phantoms, and nightmares roaming the halls are not the welcoming committee – get too close and they will F you up with fire, electricity, or sheer physical dominance. Ammo is scarce and protagonist scientist Morgan Yu’s no super soldier, so we strongly recommend you develop a gameplay style that incorporates stealth elements to increase your chances for survival. Here are some tips for sticking to the shadows. 

GENERAL ADVICESome of this goes without saying, but minimize the noise you make moving through environments by crouching until you know what you’re up against. If you see an item that looks out of place, it’s probably one of those pesky mimics just waiting to pounce on you. Once you acquire the Psychoscope, you can sweep a room visually to see if that nearby chair is actually a threat in disguise. To do this, press the Z key on PC or press the right analog stick in on consoles. Once mimics are detected, you’ll see their tag even if they shapeshift into another form.

Science-Fiction Weekly – A Second Opinion On Prey

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Science-Fiction Weekly – A Second Opinion On Prey

After spending two hours with Arkane Studios' Prey, I thought it was soulless and punishing, a game with a blank slate of a protagonist who always seemed to have his or her back against the wall. Prey's introductory moments focus intently on defining Morgan Yu, letting the player determine how this character handles situations, yet no voice is provided. We learn Yu is a lab rat of sorts, entering white room after white room to handle a series of bizarre requests. The testing goes off of the rails, yet Yu doesn't react in any way. I found the lack of character input to be jarring and almost comical. This is one of those instances where the silent protagonist approach hurts the narrative. I ended up feeling like a ghostly figure walking through a chaotic moment. The events at hand are fascinating and succeed in turning Prey's science-fiction world into a terrifying place, but I didn't feel connected to it.

Opinion – Sony And Nintendo Should Follow Microsoft’s Backward-Compatibility Example

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Sony And Nintendo Should Follow Microsoft’s Backward-Compatibility Example

At E3 2015, Microsoft revealed backward compatibility would be a big push for Xbox One going forward. The company promised around 100 games available as the functionality launched that fall, with many more to come on a regular basis. The promise seemed lofty, maybe even improbable, at the time. We poked some fun at the marketing, but at the end of the day, Microsoft has not only delivered on its promise, it has exceeded all expectations by adding new titles at a blistering pace.

Unlike its competition from Sony and Nintendo, Microsoft's backward compatibility is built into the system's operating system itself thanks to Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform. That means not only are games you already own on Xbox 360 completely free to play on Xbox One once they are added to the backward-compatibility list, but they automatically appear in your library alongside your Xbox One games if you own them digitally. This simplified approach to backward compatibility is a breath of fresh air. The idea that "it just works" harkens back to what makes consoles so attractive in the first place.

What The Heck Is This? Episode 3

about X hours ago from
 What The Heck Is This? Episode 3

We cover a lot of big, well-known games here at Game Informer. Thanks to these efforts, you (hopefully) know all about the next big franchise, or the highly-anticipated new game from that notable indie developer, but what about those random games that fly under the radar? The one among the hundreds that release every day on Steam? Or that Xbox One game with the weird title? This new video series is an attempt to highlight those games – for better or worse.

Andrew Reiner and I see these type of games all of the time. The game that we look at and say, "What the heck is that?" This is our chance to play them and decide, on the spot, if we want to keep playing them, or move on to to something different.

Today we look at two games. World to the West from the makers of Teslagrad and Shio, a game that looks to Super Meat Boy and 'Splosion Man for inspiration. Stick around to the end to hear if we want to keep going, or if it's time to move on.

Afterwords – Yooka-Laylee

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Afterwords – Yooka-Laylee

Yooka-Laylee was developed by a group of industry veterans with decades of experience creating platformers on consoles like SNES and Nintendo 64. With games like Donkey Kong Country and Banjo-Kazooie on the developers' résumés, fans had high expectations when the new studio started a Kickstarter campaign for a project promising to revisit the glory days of the 3D platformer genre.

After a successful Kickstarter campaign and a lengthy development cycle, Yooka-Laylee launched to polarizing results. While some praised it for its humor as well as its adherence to the classic 3D platformer formula, others felt it didn't modernize enough in the nearly two decades since the release of Banjo-Kazooie on N64. As a result, the Metacritic score ranges from 69 to 74 depending on the platform, with individual scores reaching as high as 100 and as low as 20. 

We caught up with Andy Robinson, writer and communications director at Playtonic Games, to ask how the team felt about the game's reception, and what he learned from the experience.

The Sports Desk – The Madden NFL 18 Wishlist

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – The Madden NFL 18 Wishlist

The countdown to Madden NFL 18 has already begun, but we don't know yet what the title is like. What areas are developer EA Tiburon focusing on? Will there be a story mode now that the series is moving over to DICE's Frostbite engine (which was used in FIFA's The Journey last year)? Will Madden Ultimate Team continue to loom large? We shall find answers to some of these questions and more at E3 next month, so in preparation I've compiled a wishlist for Madden 18.

Have an idea of your own or have something to say about the list? Please add your two cents in the comments section below.

GAMEPLAY

Here's How To Get Prey's Secret Ending

about X hours ago from
Here's How To Get Prey's Secret Ending

Prey has a number of endings that depend on how you interact with the people you come across on Talos-1.  Those endings all occur in the finale of the game. However, it's also got a secret ending you can get early on. If you want to know how to do it (and see it) and don't mind SPOILERS, read below.

Once you reach Psychtronics, you'll be contacted by an AI named December, who wants to help you escape Talos-1. This opens up a side mission called 'Who Is December?' Do this mission all the way until the end, where you end up at Alex's estate in the arboretum. Across from the top level of Alex's house is an escape pod. The problem is that the bridge you need to get to isn't up, so there's a lot of empty air between you and your bid for freedom. Alex's computer has the bridge extending program you need but there's also an easier way to get across: by building a bridge yourself on the railings with the Gloo Cannon. 

You can watch me do it here if you want to see how it's done (and the ending):

The Tomb Raiders: How Nightdive Studios Brought Back System Shock

about X hours ago from
The Tomb Raiders: How Nightdive Studios Brought Back System Shock

The recently released Prey is heavily inspired by System Shock, a series that's making a comeback after years of laying dormant, with both a remake and third entry on the way. This is the story of how a small company is responsible for bringing back a classic from the dead. This feature originally appeared in issue 281 of Game Informer.

In 1994, a Cambridge-based developer named Looking Glass Technologies released System Shock, perhaps one of the most influential games of its time. The game combined first-person shooter with role-playing systems, encouraging the player to proceed with caution through a space station’s dangerous corridors and think carefully about their every move. In 1999, Looking Glass released a sequel shortly before closing its doors; Irrational Games, which worked on System Shock 2, carried on the design of the series with the critically acclaimed BioShock. Now nearly 13 years later, a Kickstarter for a remake of the original System Shock has raked in over a million dollars, and a third game in the series is being developed by a team made up largely of developers who worked on the original.

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 24 Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 24 Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

What The Heck Is This? Episode 2

about X hours ago from
 What The Heck Is This? Episode 2

We cover a lot of big, well-known games here at Game Informer. Thanks to these efforts, you (hopefully) know all about the next big franchise, or the highly-anticipated new game from that notable indie developer, but what about those random games that fly under the radar? The one among the hundreds that release every week on Steam? Or that Xbox One game with the weird title? This new video series is an attempt to highlight those games – for better or worse.

Andrew Reiner and I see these type of games all of the time. The game that we look at and say, "What the heck is that?" This is our chance to play them and decide, on the spot, if we want to keep playing them, or move on to to something different. To watch our first episode of What The Heck Is This? head here.

For episode two, we take a look at an Xbox One game called Air Guitar Warrior for Kinect from developer Virtual Air Guitar Company. It's basically R-Type, but with Kinect-controlled air guitar shooting. For our second game we took a very scientific approach. We looked at Steam's recent release list and picked whatever looked the most absurd, which is how we landed on Xbird from developer Alexey Glinskiy.