Replay – Silent Hill 3

about X hours ago from
Replay – Silent Hill 3

Hide the children and the weak of heart! Silent Hill 3 may take place in an amusement park filled with pleasant things like a pink bunny mascot, but a closer look at it reveals blood on its mouth! Oh, the horror! In this episode of Replay, we explore this location, battle a bunch of dogs and dinosaurs, and learn more about ourselves along the way. This game holds up surprisingly well, and currently sits near the top of our list as a game we wouldn't mind Super Replaying in the future. If you second this motion, let us know in the comments section below.

Also, this is the final episode of Replay: Season 4! You are probably confused why we create seasons, and may think we're just making things up as we go. We use seasons as a way to review our work and determine where the show should go next. At the end of Season 3, we took a month-long break to create a new direction for the show. We won't be taking a break leading into Replay: Season 5. We'll be back next week with a slightly different look back at the games of yesteryear. And for those asking, the God Hand Super Replay is right around the corner. Buckle up. It's going to be a wild one.

Replay – Silent Hill 3

about X hours ago from
Replay – Silent Hill 3

Hide the children and the weak of heart! Silent Hill 3 may take place in an amusement park filled with pleasant things like a pink bunny mascot, but a closer look at it reveals blood on its mouth! Oh, the horror! In this episode of Replay, we explore this location, battle a bunch of dogs and dinosaurs, and learn more about ourselves along the way. This game holds up surprisingly well, and currently sits near the top of our list as a game we wouldn't mind Super Replaying in the future. If you second this motion, let us know in the comments section below.

Also, this is the final episode of Replay: Season 4! You are probably confused why we create seasons, and may think we're just making things up as we go. We use seasons as a way to review our work and determine where the show should go next. At the end of Season 3, we took a month-long break to create a new direction for the show. We won't be taking a break leading into Replay: Season 5. We'll be back next week with a slightly different look back at the games of yesteryear. And for those asking, the God Hand Super Replay is right around the corner. Buckle up. It's going to be a wild one.

UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

about X hours ago from
UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

As the heavyweight champion of the UFC, part-time firefighter paramedic, and expectant father, Stipe Miocic certainly keeps busy. However, even as he’s gearing up to defend his belt against light heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier in one of the biggest fights in UFC history, Miocic unwinds by playing and streaming games like Fortnite.

Miocic got introduced to Fortnite through friend and fellow UFC fighter Gian Villante and a Call of Duty group he plays regularly with. “We used to play Call of Duty together, then we went over to Fortnite, and now we’re going back to Call of Duty again,” he says. “We just kind of go back and forth.”

Fortnite has made headlines with athletes in the past, but often for the wrong reasons. In May, Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price had to cut himself off from playing Fortnite at the ballpark due to it affecting his performance and causing him to miss a start due to carpal tunnel syndrome.

UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

about X hours ago from
UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

As the heavyweight champion of the UFC, part-time firefighter paramedic, and expectant father, Stipe Miocic certainly keeps busy. However, even as he’s gearing up to defend his belt against light heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier in one of the biggest fights in UFC history, Miocic unwinds by playing and streaming games like Fortnite.

Miocic got introduced to Fortnite through friend and fellow UFC fighter Gian Villante and a Call of Duty group he plays regularly with. “We used to play Call of Duty together, then we went over to Fortnite, and now we’re going back to Call of Duty again,” he says. “We just kind of go back and forth.”

Fortnite has made headlines with athletes in the past, but often for the wrong reasons. In May, Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price had to cut himself off from playing Fortnite at the ballpark due to it affecting his performance and causing him to miss a start due to carpal tunnel syndrome.

10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

about X hours ago from
10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

Video games serve up all sorts of fantastical adventures, from battling giant monsters to dungeon delving for untold riches to sexing up aliens instead of saving the galaxy. However, video games can also make mundane activities entertaining – way more than their stupid real-life counterparts.

My recent misadventures in Houser Flipper once again reminded me of a strange and unsettling phenomenon – I sometimes spend countless hours doing the virtual simulations of activities that I try to avoid at all costs in real life. How messed up is that? And what does it say about our society and our modern lives? Would we feel happier and more fulfilled if we broke free from these cheap digital emulations and instead focused on the real activities that inspired them in the first place? If you’re seeking answers to those profound questions, go bug Javy – I’m just the guy who points out the dumb similarities.

Without further ado, here are 10 real-life activities I only enjoy in video games:

10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

about X hours ago from
10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

Video games serve up all sorts of fantastical adventures, from battling giant monsters to dungeon delving for untold riches to sexing up aliens instead of saving the galaxy. However, video games can also make mundane activities entertaining – way more than their stupid real-life counterparts.

My recent misadventures in Houser Flipper once again reminded me of a strange and unsettling phenomenon – I sometimes spend countless hours doing the virtual simulations of activities that I try to avoid at all costs in real life. How messed up is that? And what does it say about our society and our modern lives? Would we feel happier and more fulfilled if we broke free from these cheap digital emulations and instead focused on the real activities that inspired them in the first place? If you’re seeking answers to those profound questions, go bug Javy – I’m just the guy who points out the dumb similarities.

Without further ado, here are 10 real-life activities I only enjoy in video games:

The Life Exotic: Cerberus +1 Brings The Power Of Contra’s Spread Gun To Destiny 2: Forsaken

about X hours ago from
The Life Exotic: Cerberus +1 Brings The Power Of Contra’s Spread Gun To Destiny 2: Forsaken

“Because three heads are good, but four is better.” —Jeza “Jeopardy” Verlayn

Destiny’s exotic weapons sport some extravagant looks. The sleek, Egyptian adornments and sun-shaped reticle of Vigilance Wing, the monstrous frame, pulsing conductors, and electrified bullet trails of Legend of Acrius – these weapons are as much about fashion as they are about function. Sometimes, though, the best bet is to just tie four different barrels on a gun, slap a mysterious power source onto it, and hope it works.

Cerberus +1 looks like what would happen if you tried to squeeze all the ballpoints of a four-color pen through the tip at once, broke the thing, and kept writing anyway. It’s a patchwork weapon built out of the barrels, stocks, sights, and various remnants from other auto rifles, and fans should be able to spot some familiar parts. “There’s some Origin Story in there, some of it is Khvostov-inspired, there’s a bunch of various guns,” says Greg Peng, Bungie’s senior sandbox designer.

The Life Exotic: Cerberus +1 Brings The Power Of Contra’s Spread Gun To Destiny 2: Forsaken

about X hours ago from
The Life Exotic: Cerberus +1 Brings The Power Of Contra’s Spread Gun To Destiny 2: Forsaken

“Because three heads are good, but four is better.” —Jeza “Jeopardy” Verlayn

Destiny’s exotic weapons sport some extravagant looks. The sleek, Egyptian adornments and sun-shaped reticle of Vigilance Wing, the monstrous frame, pulsing conductors, and electrified bullet trails of Legend of Acrius – these weapons are as much about fashion as they are about function. Sometimes, though, the best bet is to just tie four different barrels on a gun, slap a mysterious power source onto it, and hope it works.

Cerberus +1 looks like what would happen if you tried to squeeze all the ballpoints of a four-color pen through the tip at once, broke the thing, and kept writing anyway. It’s a patchwork weapon built out of the barrels, stocks, sights, and various remnants from other auto rifles, and fans should be able to spot some familiar parts. “There’s some Origin Story in there, some of it is Khvostov-inspired, there’s a bunch of various guns,” says Greg Peng, Bungie’s senior sandbox designer.

Resident Evil 2’s Producers On New Areas And Scarier Zombies

about X hours ago from
Resident Evil 2’s Producers On New Areas And Scarier Zombies

Capcom announced the remake to Resident Evil 2 three years ago, but the publisher debuted the game for the first time at this year’s E3, and title made a big splash. At the show, we sat down with producers Yoshiaki Hirabayashi and Tsuyoshi Kanda to talk about how the original Resident Evil remake served as an example for this project, why Capcom is moving away from a shooter focus with the series, and how this might be the scariest Resident Evil game to date.

What was the plan to get Resident Evil 2 remade? Hirabayashi: The reason is really just that fans have always asked for this. There have been a long number of years with a very high demand for a remake of Resident Evil 2. Finally three years ago, the timing was right. We got it all signed off and I couldn't wait to tell everyone, so we made this unofficial soft-launch video where it was like, “We're gonna do it, don't worry.”

Resident Evil 2’s Producers On New Areas And Scarier Zombies

about X hours ago from
Resident Evil 2’s Producers On New Areas And Scarier Zombies

Capcom announced the remake to Resident Evil 2 three years ago, but the publisher debuted the game for the first time at this year’s E3, and title made a big splash. At the show, we sat down with producers Yoshiaki Hirabayashi and Tsuyoshi Kanda to talk about how the original Resident Evil remake served as an example for this project, why Capcom is moving away from a shooter focus with the series, and how this might be the scariest Resident Evil game to date.

What was the plan to get Resident Evil 2 remade? Hirabayashi: The reason is really just that fans have always asked for this. There have been a long number of years with a very high demand for a remake of Resident Evil 2. Finally three years ago, the timing was right. We got it all signed off and I couldn't wait to tell everyone, so we made this unofficial soft-launch video where it was like, “We're gonna do it, don't worry.”