5 Important Improvements For NASCAR Heat 4

about X hours ago from
5 Important Improvements For NASCAR Heat 4

Although there isn’t a particular, hyped new feature for NASCAR Heat 4, that doesn’t mean the game isn’t changing in some fundamental ways. In fact, developer Monster Games has made a host of improvements for this iteration of the series that should be evident right from the start. Several of these upgrades are born out of a single feature: more gameplay control via sliders. Whether you directly use these or not, even behind the scenes they are part of how NASCAR Heat 4 is working to be better than its predecessor.

In my hands-on time with the game, one of the things that was immediately noticeable was the fact that the rest of the A.I. cars took multiple race lines around the track when possible. This is a change from past iterations, and it opens up different strategies and outcomes. For the players themselves, the long-term advantages of using a different line throughout the race may necessitate tweaking your car’s setup to get maximum results.

Schools In Video Games We’d Love (Or Hate) To Attend

about X hours ago from
Schools In Video Games We’d Love (Or Hate) To Attend

High school and college can be difficult, but we always have video games to keep our brains in shape. Whether you want to learn magic, the Force, or the good-old “three R’s” (despite the fact that only “Reading” starts with an R), there are myriad schools where the price of admission is the tag on the game box.

Why it would be awesome: Pokémon schools are sprinkled throughout the mainline Pokémon games, but it only takes around 10 minutes, if that, to see everything they have to offer. In Pokémon Ranger: Shadows of Almia, however, you spend the first hour or two training to be one of the titular Pokémon Rangers, making friends and learning the game’s mechanics from your teachers, many of whom you continue to encounter throughout the rest of the game. Getting to spend your school days befriending Pokémon and training to be a Pokémon Ranger would be any kid’s dream!

Schools In Video Games We’d Love (Or Hate) To Attend

about X hours ago from
Schools In Video Games We’d Love (Or Hate) To Attend

High school and college can be difficult, but we always have video games to keep our brains in shape. Whether you want to learn magic, the Force, or the good-old “three R’s” (despite the fact that only “Reading” starts with an R), there are myriad schools where the price of admission is the tag on the game box.

Why it would be awesome: Pokémon schools are sprinkled throughout the mainline Pokémon games, but it only takes around 10 minutes, if that, to see everything they have to offer. In Pokémon Ranger: Shadows of Almia, however, you spend the first hour or two training to be one of the titular Pokémon Rangers, making friends and learning the game’s mechanics from your teachers, many of whom you continue to encounter throughout the rest of the game. Getting to spend your school days befriending Pokémon and training to be a Pokémon Ranger would be any kid’s dream!

Replay – Spyro: A Hero's Tail

about X hours ago from
Replay – Spyro: A Hero's Tail

Spyro the Dragon is a beloved character who has far too many skeletons in his closet. Following Insomniac Games' brilliant trilogy of games, the purple dragon fell on dark times, bouncing from one development house to the next, none capable of delivering the magic fans have come to expect. Spyro: A Hero's Tail is one of those failed ventures. It looks like Spyro and plays like Spyro, but the heart and soul of the adventure is missing. The flow isn't right.

A Hero's Tail is Spyro's fifth console game and was developed by Eurocom Entertainment. It released for PlayStation 2, Xbox, and GameCube on November 9, 2004. We take a look at the opening moments of the game, and then transition to another game that holds our interest more for our Roulette segment.

Enjoy the show, and we'll see you again in seven days!

Replay – Spyro: A Hero's Tail

about X hours ago from
Replay – Spyro: A Hero's Tail

Spyro the Dragon is a beloved character who has far too many skeletons in his closet. Following Insomniac Games' brilliant trilogy of games, the purple dragon fell on dark times, bouncing from one development house to the next, none capable of delivering the magic fans have come to expect. Spyro: A Hero's Tail is one of those failed ventures. It looks like Spyro and plays like Spyro, but the heart and soul of the adventure is missing. The flow isn't right.

A Hero's Tail is Spyro's fifth console game and was developed by Eurocom Entertainment. It released for PlayStation 2, Xbox, and GameCube on November 9, 2004. We take a look at the opening moments of the game, and then transition to another game that holds our interest more for our Roulette segment.

Enjoy the show, and we'll see you again in seven days!

Why I Like Dragon Quest Builders 2 So Dang Much: An Investigation

about X hours ago from
Why I Like Dragon Quest Builders 2 So Dang Much: An Investigation

Staying on top of games is especially hard in 2019. The pace of new releases and the ballooning length of triple-A titles has turned my pile of shame into a turbo-powered treadmill I can’t possibly keep up with. Even as we speak type/read, I’ve got Deacon St. John (srsly that name tho) waiting patiently in the freaker apocalypse for me to come back. I can’t imagine all the delightfully stupid creations Dreams offers now, and I haven’t even started Judgment, which promises to suck up at least 30 hours of my time on Mahjong alone! With all of these massive games to play and even more to come, I can’t possibly justify dinking around in a goofy little game like Dragon Quest Builders 2. Yet here we are.

I’ve never quite been able to identify why some games make me want to wrap myself up in them like a warm fuzzy blanket while forsaking all professional and familial responsibilities. Quality alone isn’t an accurate indicator; there are plenty of great games that I nevertheless fall off of and have a hard time going back to. Just ask Kassandra – if you can find whatever Greek island I marooned her on. Being outstanding also doesn’t guarantee I’ll think about them incessantly – I may have platinumed Spider-Man in a week, but I haven’t given the nerdy web-head a spare thought since then.

Why I Like Dragon Quest Builders 2 So Dang Much: An Investigation

about X hours ago from
Why I Like Dragon Quest Builders 2 So Dang Much: An Investigation

Staying on top of games is especially hard in 2019. The pace of new releases and the ballooning length of triple-A titles has turned my pile of shame into a turbo-powered treadmill I can’t possibly keep up with. Even as we speak type/read, I’ve got Deacon St. John (srsly that name tho) waiting patiently in the freaker apocalypse for me to come back. I can’t imagine all the delightfully stupid creations Dreams offers now, and I haven’t even started Judgment, which promises to suck up at least 30 hours of my time on Mahjong alone! With all of these massive games to play and even more to come, I can’t possibly justify dinking around in a goofy little game like Dragon Quest Builders 2. Yet here we are.

I’ve never quite been able to identify why some games make me want to wrap myself up in them like a warm fuzzy blanket while forsaking all professional and familial responsibilities. Quality alone isn’t an accurate indicator; there are plenty of great games that I nevertheless fall off of and have a hard time going back to. Just ask Kassandra – if you can find whatever Greek island I marooned her on. Being outstanding also doesn’t guarantee I’ll think about them incessantly – I may have platinumed Spider-Man in a week, but I haven’t given the nerdy web-head a spare thought since then.

What To Expect From Wolfenstein: Youngblood On Switch

about X hours ago from
What To Expect From Wolfenstein: Youngblood On Switch

Wolfenstein: Youngblood is now officially out on PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC. All in all, Youngblood is a pretty great time (our review is here). We played the PC version of the game for review, but I also got my dirty, Nazi-clobberin' mitts on the Switch version to see how it compares. If you've been considering playing Youngblood on Switch and are curious about the possible benefits and drawbacks of this version in particular,  you've come to the right place.

I've spent three hours with the Switch version and have dabbled in pretty much every activity and the biggest spaces in both single-player and multiplayer, so while I can't speak to the whole experience, I can provide a general sense what to expect if you decide to go with the Switch version.

As was the case with Panic Button's port of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Youngblood's gameplay is just as satisfying on the Switch as it is on the other versions. Sure, the framerate is capped at 30, but as someone who played through the game at 60 FPS on a PC, the action doesn't feel too altered. It's still just as fun to mow down Nazis, and I noticed no slowdown whatsoever on Switch, even when embroiled in massive battles with impressive particle effects firing off in every direction. You don't have to worry about this version struggling in terms of performance.

What To Expect From Wolfenstein: Youngblood On Switch

about X hours ago from
What To Expect From Wolfenstein: Youngblood On Switch

Wolfenstein: Youngblood is now officially out on PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC. All in all, Youngblood is a pretty great time (our review is here). We played the PC version of the game for review, but I also got my dirty, Nazi-clobberin' mitts on the Switch version to see how it compares. If you've been considering playing Youngblood on Switch and are curious about the possible benefits and drawbacks of this version in particular,  you've come to the right place.

I've spent three hours with the Switch version and have dabbled in pretty much every activity and the biggest spaces in both single-player and multiplayer, so while I can't speak to the whole experience, I can provide a general sense what to expect if you decide to go with the Switch version.

As was the case with Panic Button's port of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Youngblood's gameplay is just as satisfying on the Switch as it is on the other versions. Sure, the framerate is capped at 30, but as someone who played through the game at 60 FPS on a PC, the action doesn't feel too altered. It's still just as fun to mow down Nazis, and I noticed no slowdown whatsoever on Switch, even when embroiled in massive battles with impressive particle effects firing off in every direction. You don't have to worry about this version struggling in terms of performance.

10 Tips To Lead Your Heroes To Victory In Fire Emblem: Three Houses

about X hours ago from
10 Tips To Lead Your Heroes To Victory In Fire Emblem: Three Houses

With big branching paths and plenty of systems to explore, Fire Emblem: Three Houses is a massive game. As a professor, you’ll need to prepare your students for success on and off the battlefield, especially as conflict heats up and things inch toward war. After reviewing the game and logging time well into my second playthrough, I’ve become a well of knowledge in how to best use your time and what you need to keep in mind to put your best foot forward. Here are some tips to make the big journey less daunting.

Here’s what it really comes down to: You will be spending a lot of time with the members of your selected house, especially the leader. Keep this in mind as you make your selection. There is no right or wrong choice, but the game is heavily focused on the members of your house. You can recruit and get to know characters from other houses, but it takes a little more work as you must impress them with your skill level as a professor. From what I’ve experienced, all the houses seem pretty balanced, with their share of interesting characters and challenges you need to help them overcome to grow.