Life Of An Exotic: The Return Of Destiny’s First Weapon

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Life Of An Exotic: The Return Of Destiny’s First Weapon

With Destiny’s newest expansion, Rise of Iron, Bungie is giving fans a shot of nostalgia in the form of an automatic rifle. The Khvostov was the first weapon players picked up when they started playing Destiny almost two years ago, and that classic rifle will soon return with a significant power boost as one of Destiny’s newest exotic weapons. We sat down with Bungie’s art director Shiek Wang and lead designer Ryan Paradis as they explained the Khvostov’s trajectory back into relevance.

An Exotic Two Years In The MakingBungie didn’t think much of the Khvostov when they originally created it. It was the first weapon players used, so it served a purpose in helping provide players with a positive early experience, but it was quickly followed by a thousand more powerful weapons with a host of more useful perks.

“I think it was very much like, ‘Hey, we need an old weapon that speaks to European design language, pick this reference, use it, make it look broken.’ And then we moved on to designing other things,” says art director Shiek Wang.

Test Chamber – Slinging Spells In Shadowverse

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Test Chamber – Slinging Spells In Shadowverse

Players have a ton of options competing for their digital trading card game time these days, one of which is the mobile offering Shadowverse.

While many of the mechanics are easy to pick up and play right from other popular DCGs like Hearthstone, each class in Shadowverse comes with unique rules that facilitate completely different playstyles.

The evolve ability also adds some depth to timing and finesse to the game. Join Daniel Tack and Wade Wojcik as they see if they can master the mechanics of two different classes in a few quick brawls in this episode of Test Chamber!

Test Chamber – Making Moves In Mobius Final Fantasy

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Test Chamber – Making Moves In Mobius Final Fantasy

The love of all things Tonberry and Ifrit has seemingly no saturation point as yet another Final Fantasy mobile title arrives in North American markets, Mobius Final Fantasy.

While it's been around overseas for some time, now everyone can get in on the fun of changing job classes, collecting classic monsters, and bashing through battle after battle.

Join Daniel Tack and Joe Juba for a quick peek at the latest title to carry on the legacy of the classic RPG franchise in this episode of Test Chamber!

Blog Herding - The Best Blogs Of The Community (August 4, 2016)

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Blog Herding - The Best Blogs Of The Community (August 4, 2016)

We took a week off, but that only means Blog Herding has returned like a Saiyan on the brink of death: stronger, faster, and more powerful than you could ever imagine.

Community Blogs For July 21 - August 3:

The Philosophical Implications of Pokémon Go's Success Instead of pondering why the world is the way it is, Marco Polo gets philosophical on the latest Pokémon craze and what it all means. It's a long read, but stick with it and you'll be rewarded.   

Test Chamber – Kicking ASCII In Roguelike Brutal

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Test Chamber – Kicking ASCII In Roguelike Brutal

Brutal is coming to PlayStation 4 next week and it's a distinct callback to classic ASCII dungeon crawlers with a modern twist, so we decided to take a look.

Brian Shea and I find out if the game lives up to its namesake by making our down into the text, collecting letters, passing the 'J', making potions, and beating up bad guys.

Brutal releases August 9 on PlayStation 4. For our review of the game, head here.

Five Games That Find Drama In Realism

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Five Games That Find Drama In Realism

Life is boring. At least, compared to video games it is. But there’s a certain allure to the mundanity of life, and a romanticism found in meaningful conversations. There’s comfort in the quieter moments where we find ourselves in-between responsibilities. You may find tension in the silent moments after a loss, a darker intention behind a conversation that once seemed innocent, and a weight in making a choice.

As it often does, art imitates life, and a few games have dipped their toes in these themes. Mechanics are stripped away to be replaced by mundanity, quietness, or an evening that starts well and ends horribly. Here are a few of those games and what makes them special.

Freshman YearMoving to a new city isn’t easy. For young Nina, it was a nightmare. A student and new resident to New York, your time with Nina in Freshman Year starts innocently enough: you answer texts from a friend about going out while choosing what Nina is going to wear. You have no reason to expect the night holds anything but good times, except for the ominous warning that rests under the window of the browser game: “Please be aware that this game depicts scenarios that may be distressing to people who have experienced abuse.”

We Take A Look Inside The Quirky Worlds And Exciting Heists Of Blendo Games

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We Take A Look Inside The Quirky Worlds And Exciting Heists Of Blendo Games

Last week, indie developer Blendo Games released Quadrilateral Cowboy, a hacking-based puzzle adventure long in development, and I kind of fell in love with it. Quadrilateral Cowboy isn't Blendo Games' first title, however. The developer has been releasing strange, often narrative-focused games since 2008. We decided to run through several of the most notable games in Blendo's catalog and talk to the man behind the studio, Brendon Chung, about the influences that helped create the unique aesthetic shared across these games.

Gravity Bone (2008)

Though Gravity Bone isn't Blendo's first game, it's the first to use what would become the trademark aesthetic also featured in Thirty Flights of Loving and Quadrilateral Cowboy – people presented as blocky caricatures instead of photorealistic models and a thematic fascination with manuals and espionage. The short game follows the adventures of a spy completing a series of objectives, like delivering a poisoned drink to a target at a party, before the spy eventually killed by a mysterious woman. It's an interactive story that's told in a surreal matter with smash cuts and no intelligible dialogue. When I asked Chung about the motif of manuals that shows up in all three of his narrative games, he talked about taking apart machines and putting them back together when he was a child:

Discussing The Strange And Alluring Kentucky Route Zero Act IV

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Discussing The Strange And Alluring Kentucky Route Zero Act IV

Cardboard Computer’s haunting new episode of Kentucky Route Zero released recently. The point-and-click episodic adventure’s first act came out back in 2013, and the studio has slowly but progressively released new episodes year to year. What began as a story following the older trucker Conway, who wished to find the highway known as Route Zero to complete a delivery, has become less about the destination and more about the journey. Set in rural Kentucky, we now see Conway and his fellow drifter confidants hitching a ride on a boat as they continue their quest to deliver a parcel for the antique shop he works for. Editor Javy Gwaltney and I sat down to chat about our thoughts on Kentucky Route Zero and what’s special about this newest act.

Warning: there are spoilers ahead!

Elise: Javy, you told me that you recently wrapped up the latest act of Kentucky Route Zero. I adore this weird and haunting game, and was pleased with how the recent act turned out. So, what were your impressions? Did it meet your expectations after such a long wait?

Here Are The 40+ Announced Monsters From Pokémon Sun And Moon

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Here Are The 40+ Announced Monsters From Pokémon Sun And Moon

Pokémon Sun and Moon isn't coming until November, but Nintendo and The Pokémon Company haven't been huddled away in secrecy leading up to the game's release. Fans have been getting a steady stream of reveals for the new creatures, some of which have already become favorites. We've compiled the announced Pokémon in one handy spot, which we'll continue to update as new ones are revealed to the world.

Pokémon Sun and Moon is coming to the 3DS on November 18.

Alolan Exeggutor

RPG Grind Time – Three Upcoming RPGs You Should Have On Your Radar

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RPG Grind Time – Three Upcoming RPGs You Should Have On Your Radar

Every time I turn around, it feels like an RPG I need to make time for is on the horizon. At times this can be overwhelming, especially considering the time commitment, but I wouldn't have it any other way. The only way the genre gets better is for developers - big and small - to try new things; the more variety we have, the more opportunities there are to draw new players into the genre and help it prosper. One of my goals with this column has been to talk about a wide array of games. That means touching on everything from the triple-A juggernauts to the smaller gems you might not know much about. Today's column focuses on the latter – three upcoming games that as an RPG fan you should have on your radar. These titles are coming out in the very near future, and they also have one more thing in common – they're all sticking with the tried-and-true turn-based battle system and doing interesting things with it.

Earthlock: Festival of Magic (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Wii U, PC) Release: September 1 (PC, Xbox One) (PS4, Wii U TBD)