We Deserve Better From Games With Breakable Weapons

about X hours ago from
We Deserve Better From Games With Breakable Weapons

CRACK! CLANG! SNAP! I cringe whenever I hear these sounds in a game with breakable weapons. Neglecting to keep an eye on a sword’s durability can lead to disaster, or at least a panicked moment of diving into a satchel to see if I have anything useful in reserve. Yes, I fully realize I am to blame when a weapon breaks in my hands – especially if the game allows me to monitor its degradation as I play. Yet even if I stay on top of the durability, I develop a strange connection to the game; I spend more time in menus, adopt a strange hoarder-like mentality, and take a conservative approach to using elite gear for fear of not having it when I really need it.

I understand why developers incorporate breakable weapons into games. If handled properly, weapon durability adds a survival element to an experience that can take us out of our comfort zones. In one conflict, I may have substantial heavily artillery that allows me to stand my ground and mow down dozens of zombies with ease. In the next encounter against a similarly sized zombie swarm, my depleted arsenal may force me to pick them off one by one with a pistol as I backpedal to safety. In these battles, I not only have to worry about ammo conservation, but also making sure my armament can hold up long enough to fire those rounds. Almost every shot counts.

We Deserve Better From Games With Breakable Weapons

about X hours ago from
We Deserve Better From Games With Breakable Weapons

CRACK! CLANG! SNAP! I cringe whenever I hear these sounds in a game with breakable weapons. Neglecting to keep an eye on a sword’s durability can lead to disaster, or at least a panicked moment of diving into a satchel to see if I have anything useful in reserve. Yes, I fully realize I am to blame when a weapon breaks in my hands – especially if the game allows me to monitor its degradation as I play. Yet even if I stay on top of the durability, I develop a strange connection to the game; I spend more time in menus, adopt a strange hoarder-like mentality, and take a conservative approach to using elite gear for fear of not having it when I really need it.

I understand why developers incorporate breakable weapons into games. If handled properly, weapon durability adds a survival element to an experience that can take us out of our comfort zones. In one conflict, I may have substantial heavily artillery that allows me to stand my ground and mow down dozens of zombies with ease. In the next encounter against a similarly sized zombie swarm, my depleted arsenal may force me to pick them off one by one with a pistol as I backpedal to safety. In these battles, I not only have to worry about ammo conservation, but also making sure my armament can hold up long enough to fire those rounds. Almost every shot counts.

iOS 13 Might Make The iPhone A Legitimate Handheld Gaming System

about X hours ago from
iOS 13 Might Make The iPhone A Legitimate Handheld Gaming System

Bluetooth controller compatibility is finally coming to iPhones this fall with iOS 13 which means you will, at long last, be able to use Xbox One and PlayStation 4 controllers with your Apple device. You can try out controller compatibility early, however, by opting into the public beta for the new operating system here. It’s a simple (and legitimate, I promise) sign-up process that basically asks you to acknowledge that this is a beta which may lead to errors and encourages you to back up your iPhone. I did this last week in an effort to try and play Sky: Children of the Light with a controller. Sky was not compatible, unfortunately, but the effort put me on a path that now leads to me to publicly encourage developers to please, please add Bluetooth controller compatibility to your iPhone games because it makes me reconsider the viability of my mobile device as a gaming device in a new way. I might be able to finally enjoy traditional gaming experiences (like shooters, platformers, and other genres that benefit from a controller) on the computer that I carry around with me in my pocket.

iOS 13 Might Make The iPhone A Legitimate Handheld Gaming System

about X hours ago from
iOS 13 Might Make The iPhone A Legitimate Handheld Gaming System

Bluetooth controller compatibility is finally coming to iPhones this fall with iOS 13 which means you will, at long last, be able to use Xbox One and PlayStation 4 controllers with your Apple device. You can try out controller compatibility early, however, by opting into the public beta for the new operating system here. It’s a simple (and legitimate, I promise) sign-up process that basically asks you to acknowledge that this is a beta which may lead to errors and encourages you to back up your iPhone. I did this last week in an effort to try and play Sky: Children of the Light with a controller. Sky was not compatible, unfortunately, but the effort put me on a path that now leads to me to publicly encourage developers to please, please add Bluetooth controller compatibility to your iPhone games because it makes me reconsider the viability of my mobile device as a gaming device in a new way. I might be able to finally enjoy traditional gaming experiences (like shooters, platformers, and other genres that benefit from a controller) on the computer that I carry around with me in my pocket.

Charting Harry Potter's Rocky Gaming History

about X hours ago from
Charting Harry Potter's Rocky Gaming History

As today is his birthday, The Boy Who Lived has now lived to the age of 39, and what better way to celebrate the magical hero’s big day than with some magical games based on his adventures?! Harry Potter games have had a tumultuous history, so let’s spin a few Time Turners and revisit its highs and lows. 

For each of the eight movies in the Harry Potter series, there has been a game adaptation of the same name. These offerings on console occasionally offer experiences with some depth. More often, however, many of them seemed to ride on the popularity of their film counterparts, expecting success based on the brand name alone. While they vary in quality, most of the games at least do a serviceable attempt at letting fans of the franchise interact with the characters and locations they’ve come to love.

Charting Harry Potter's Rocky Gaming History

about X hours ago from
Charting Harry Potter's Rocky Gaming History

As today is his birthday, The Boy Who Lived has now lived to the age of 39, and what better way to celebrate the magical hero’s big day than with some magical games based on his adventures?! Harry Potter games have had a tumultuous history, so let’s spin a few Time Turners and revisit its highs and lows. 

For each of the eight movies in the Harry Potter series, there has been a game adaptation of the same name. These offerings on console occasionally offer experiences with some depth. More often, however, many of them seemed to ride on the popularity of their film counterparts, expecting success based on the brand name alone. While they vary in quality, most of the games at least do a serviceable attempt at letting fans of the franchise interact with the characters and locations they’ve come to love.

Fire Emblem: Three Houses Builds An Army Worth Caring About

about X hours ago from
Fire Emblem: Three Houses Builds An Army Worth Caring About

Now that Fire Emblem: Three Houses has been out for almost a week, I can finally talk about it in detail with you all, which has me over the moon. My review pretty much sums up my thoughts, but here’s the short version: This game got its hooks in me and still hasn’t let go. One of the things that most impressed me about Three Houses is just how much I cared about my combatants and how much being put in the role of a professor enhances the experience. I’ve talked before about the importance of making RPGs more personal and how party bonding matters so much in a genre that has us spending so much time with characters. When an RPG does something well, it’s worth discussing, so let’s break down what Three Houses does to connect you with students to make battles take on a new level of intensity. 

Fire Emblem: Three Houses Builds An Army Worth Caring About

about X hours ago from
Fire Emblem: Three Houses Builds An Army Worth Caring About

Now that Fire Emblem: Three Houses has been out for almost a week, I can finally talk about it in detail with you all, which has me over the moon. My review pretty much sums up my thoughts, but here’s the short version: This game got its hooks in me and still hasn’t let go. One of the things that most impressed me about Three Houses is just how much I cared about my combatants and how much being put in the role of a professor enhances the experience. I’ve talked before about the importance of making RPGs more personal and how party bonding matters so much in a genre that has us spending so much time with characters. When an RPG does something well, it’s worth discussing, so let’s break down what Three Houses does to connect you with students to make battles take on a new level of intensity. 

The Top 10 Game Boy Games

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Game Boy Games

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the North American release of Nintendo's first handheld gaming device, the Game Boy. Released in 1989, the Game Boy was a successor of sorts to the hugely successful NES, but was completely handheld. To commemorate the occasion we decided to debate our 10 favorite games released for the original handheld. You could argue the Game Boy and its successor the Game Boy Color were essentially the same system, but in order to keep this list as close to the original Game Boy as possible, we decided not to include great Game Boy Color games like Pokémon Gold & Silver (which was playable on the original Game Boy, but released with the Game Boy Color logo on its spine) and Color-exclusive games like Metal Gear Solid (Metal Gear: Ghost Babel in Japan). We also skipped games that received simultaneous Game Boy/NES releases, like Dr. Mario. With those caveats in place, we hope you enjoy debating our list as much as we did!

The Top 10 Game Boy Games

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Game Boy Games

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the North American release of Nintendo's first handheld gaming device, the Game Boy. Released in 1989, the Game Boy was a successor of sorts to the hugely successful NES, but was completely handheld. To commemorate the occasion we decided to debate our 10 favorite games released for the original handheld. You could argue the Game Boy and its successor the Game Boy Color were essentially the same system, but in order to keep this list as close to the original Game Boy as possible, we decided not to include great Game Boy Color games like Pokémon Gold & Silver (which was playable on the original Game Boy, but released with the Game Boy Color logo on its spine) and Color-exclusive games like Metal Gear Solid (Metal Gear: Ghost Babel in Japan). We also skipped games that received simultaneous Game Boy/NES releases, like Dr. Mario. With those caveats in place, we hope you enjoy debating our list as much as we did!