Science-Fiction Weekly – Kong: Skull Island, Y: The Last Man, The Last Of Us, Terminator

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Kong: Skull Island, Y: The Last Man, The Last Of Us, Terminator

One of my favorite holidays is just a few days away. No, I'm not talking about the wonderfully gluttonous Thanksgiving. I love shopping, and there's no better day to do that than on Black Friday. I don't wake up at the crack of dawn to track down "door buster" bargains; I'm more in the market for dirt cheap Blu-Ray movies and television shows. The crowds and lines have never been that bad in my neck of the woods, and I've never run into shortages on items I want to pick up. For the first time this year, I haven't looked in advance at ads to see what I may want to purchase. I'm going in blind, and my excitement levels are through the roof. I know this is a random aside for my Science-Fiction Weekly column, but it could be a primer for next week's discussion if I happen to pick up a few science-fiction movies or shows. It's also a nice reminder that Thanksgiving and Black Friday are imminent. Get your food, and don't buy a lot of stuff for the chance of getting it cheaper this weekend.

Test Chamber - Don't Overlook Dragon Ball Fusions

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber - Don't Overlook Dragon Ball Fusions

Dragon Ball Fusions is out today for 3DS, moved up from its original December 13 release date, but what is it?

Turns out it's an RPG with turn-based tactics gameplay that allows you to fuse certain familiar Dragon Ball Z characters together (like the two pictured above) to create never-before-seen combinations. It's a strange entry in the library of Dragon Ball Z video games, and Ben Hanson and I talk about our experience with the game so far while showing off its combat and absurd story. We also show off its weird photo fusing feature, where you and a friend can fuse to create the ultimate (or worst) hero.

If you want to hear more about Dragon Ball Fusions, tune into the Game Informer Show podcast (subscribe here!) later this week to hear Hanson and I chat about it and its comparisons to this year's other Dragon Ball Z game, Xenoverse 2.

Getting To Know The Tempest: Mass Effect's New Normandy

about X hours ago from
Getting To Know The Tempest: Mass Effect's New Normandy

When you’re exploring the far reaches of space, it helps to have a home away from home. In the Mass Effect series, your ship serves a variety of purposes. It can be a military base, where you plot your next tactical move; it can be a clubhouse, where you hang out with companions and get to know them better; and it can be a command center, where you make decisions about your character’s progression.

In the Mass Effect trilogy, players had the Normandy, which became almost as iconic as Commander Shepard. In Mass Effect Andromeda, you have the Tempest, a ship that functions like the Normandy in some ways, but also stands out with its own distinguishing features and innovations. Since players will spend a lot of time aboard this vessel exploring its corridors and interacting with its crew, we’re taking a closer look at what you can expect from the Tempest and how it helps in your mission to find a new home in Andromeda.

Areas of Interest During our trip to BioWare’s Montreal studio, we got a limited virtual tour of the Tempest. The team wasn’t ready to show off every corner of the ship, but we saw some of the major areas, like the bridge, the galley, the garage, and the Pathfinder’s quarters. You can seamlessly travel between these locations, with no loading screens or painfully slow elevators to hold you back.

The Sports Desk – The Positives & Problems Of VR Sports Games

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – The Positives & Problems Of VR Sports Games

Virtual reality promises more immersion, but is it right for sports games? I recently dabbled with some of the sports titles out there in VR on the Oculus Rift, PlayStation VR, and HTC Vive (I didn't play them all, FYI) figuring out what works and what doesn't in the medium.

The biggest challenge for VR is reducing the possibility of users getting sick. This normally occurs when you give them the freedom of head/camera movement like in any normal first-person title. In my experience, those that worked best were those that restricted players movement to a set area. I'm actually a person that can suffer from motion sickness in FPS titles as they approach a solid 60 frames per second, and in instances like The Golf Club VR (above and in Early Access), Project Cars, Driveclub, and Dirt Rally (the later three conveniently seating the player in a cockpit) I more or less felt fine.

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Seven Hours

about X hours ago from
Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Seven Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

Replay – The Terminator Spectacular

about X hours ago from

This week on Replay, we look at four Terminator games of varying quality for the Super Nintendo with Capcom's Tim Turi.

We play games covering the first two Terminator films, and our first features a robot police officer who rose to prominence around the same time as James Cameron's time-hopping android from Austria.

Alongside Tim, you can look forward to (or dread) commentary from Andrew Reiner, Jeff Cork, and myself.

Funny To A Point – Three Cheers For Escapism!

about X hours ago from
Funny To A Point – Three Cheers For Escapism!

This week's column invites you to forget your cares by celebrating how games invite you to forget your cares. It's turtles all the way down from here.

Even if you weren't alive in the '90s, you're probably aware of the post-Doom scrutiny video games fell under, as parents and politicians alike blamed our digital hobby for everything that was wrong with those darned kids (then again, if you really weren't alive in the '90s, those darned kids probably are your parents). The truth is, video games have always been an easy scapegoat for the Jack Thompsons of the world; most of the people complaining about video games in the '80s and '90s didn't really even understand how computers worked – the interactive, animated games they ran might as well have been evil voodoo spirits invading their tiny living picture boxes.

Mass Effect Andromeda's New Approach To Romance

about X hours ago from
Mass Effect Andromeda's New Approach To Romance

Romance is one of the most popular elements of the Mass Effect series, and deciding which relationship to pursue is the most difficult choice for some players to make. After all, who wants to be lonely in space? And who wants to spend their time on the wrong partner?

BioWare has let us cozy up to various party members through the years, and each have their own memorable moments. The best part of exploring romantic arcs is that characters often reveal different sides of themselves, such as Jack allowing you to see her emotional side to her, and Garrus showing he's not always calm and collected when it comes to matters of the heart. For Mass Effect Andromeda, BioWare wants to make romances more natural and realistic, featuring different levels of intimacy. While the team isn't ready to talk about these love connections in detail, we did uncover some basic info by chatting with creative director Mac Walters.

Moving Forward From The Trilogy

Test Chamber – The Changes In Pokémon Sun & Moon

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – The Changes In Pokémon Sun & Moon

Pokémon Sun & Moon is out today, and it brings some surprising changes to the series.

Join Wade Wojcik, intern/Pokémon superfan Kevin Slackie, and I to see some of the changes that make Sun & Moon feel different than previous Pokémon games, even if it does retain the series' core mechanics.

For our review of Pokémon Sun & Moon, head here.