What We Want From Red Dead Redemption 2

about X hours ago from
What We Want From Red Dead Redemption 2

Following a couple of teases this week, Rockstar Games finally revealed Red Dead Redemption 2 earlier today. The follow-up to one of last generation's most beloved titles is set to hit in fall 2017, and while we don't know much, Rockstar did give several hints on the direction of its next massive game. The first description given by Rockstar is "an epic tale of life in America's unforgiving heartland." Rockstar goes on to talk about how it also plans to use that setting to deliver "a brand new online multiplayer experience."

According to Sam Houser, founder of Rockstar Games, the team wants to continue to push its vision for "interactive entertainment in a truly living world" that "builds upon everything [they've] learned making games." As the creators of some of the most lauded games of all time (including the best-selling game ever in Grand Theft Auto V), that is a lofty goal. We may not know what Rockstar wants to do with the next entry in the Red Dead series, but we have some ideas of what we'd like from Red Dead Redemption 2. Check out our wishlist below and let us know in the comments what you want from Rockstar's upcoming western.

More Masterful StorytellingJavy Gwaltney

Test Chamber – Going Back To Gotham In Batman: Return To Arkham

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Going Back To Gotham In Batman: Return To Arkham

Batman: Return to Arkham is the remastered bundle of Batman: Arkham Asylum and Batman: Arkham City. In this episode of Test Chamber, Andrew Reiner, Brian Shea, and I reminisce over how great Batman: Arkham Asylum was, along with all agreeing that Arkham City was the slightly better game. Outside of noticeably sprucing up the visuals, both games are exactly the same, which is not a bad thing.

Batman: Return to Arkham is available now for the PS4 and Xbox One. For Andrew Reiner's thoughts on the original release of Batman: Arkham Asylum, check out his review here and for his final verdict on the last-generation version Batman: Arkham City, check out the review here.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

The Sports Desk – Glitches, Every NBA 2K17 Shoe & Football Manager 2017

about X hours ago from

As much as we love the sports games we play, that doesn't mean we can't have some fun at their expense from time to time. So this week I've included a few examples of when the good times go bad, or at least humorous.

The YouTube videos below are just a few examples of the funny glitches that gamers have found, and while they certainly show some crazy things happening, I don't know which platforms these posters are on or even if they've since been patched out of the games. It's just a lighthearted look, and surely some amusing fodder for this year's Glitchy awards...

Kicker Ices the Game – Madden NFL 17

Why Ubisoft Trusted The Rocksmith Team With South Park

about X hours ago from
Why Ubisoft Trusted The Rocksmith Team With South Park

Fans of Obsidian's South Park: The Stick of Truth might have been surprised to hear that the television show's next RPG is being made by Ubisoft San Francisco, the developers behind the music-rhythm game Rocksmith. While visiting the studio for our November cover story on South Park: The Fractured But Whole, we spoke with senior producer Jason Schroeder and director of design Paul Cross about how the team went from third-party consultants on Ubisoft-published games to tackling an ambitious RPG alongside Matt Stone and Trey Parker.

Watch the video below to learn more about the studio behind the new game and what the future holds for potential future South Park games.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Replay – The Silver Case

about X hours ago from
Replay – The Silver Case

On Replay, we usually take a look at games that were released years ago. This week, we're doing something a bit different: although The Silver Case was released in Japan in 1999, it's only now become available in English via a PC, HD remaster.

The Silver Case was the first game developed by Grasshopper Manufacture, the studio lead by eccentric and legendary game designer Suda Goichi. Like most of Suda's work, it's incredibly weird, both thematically and mechanically. You kind of have to meet it on its own terms and roll with some of its weirder aspects.

That's why Andrew Reiner, Kyle Hiliard, Jeff Cork, and I decided to do the exact opposite: laugh at all the dialogue and make up voices for all the characters in this visual novel. You can watch us do that in the video below.

Test Chamber – An Early Look At Jackbox Party Pack 3's Best Games

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – An Early Look At Jackbox Party Pack 3's Best Games

Sure, there are a lot of games out there that let players express themselves. But how many let you compete with friends over the best fart joke? Next Tuesday, Jackbox Games (the creators of You Don't Know Jack) are releasing their third party game bundle entitled Jackbox Party Pack 3. Featuring four new party games and a sequel to the beloved Quiplash, Jackbox Party Pack 3 is designed for you and a group of friends to use your phone to compete in trivia or just some general absurdity. On this episode of Test Chamber, Jeff Corkj and I are joined by Jackbox Games' Arnie Niekamp and Ryan DiGiorgi to walk through some of the new games in the bundle this year.

Watch the video below to watch us compete in a deadly Trivia Murder Party, Guesspionage, and the ol' classic Quiplash.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Three Hours

about X hours ago from
Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Three Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

In the first episode we explore the city a little bit, make a friend with a fellow capsule toy collector, and get all our stuff stolen. There's also a lady who forgot to finish getting dressed who really likes her motorcycle. In episode two, we make some progress by giving a hungry guy who loves naps some money, and getting a job that's almost as cool as being a forklift driver. We punch a tree in episode three.

Stay tuned for more episodes at some point, and leave us lots of comments! We'll probably read yours on the next episode.

Five Great Games About The Great War

about X hours ago from

If EA and DICE have learned anything over the last fourteen years, it’s how to cut a great trailer. The Battlefield 1 reveal at E3 made everyone watching sit up and take notice. It’s a pulse-pounding, swashbuckling, violent montage of biplanes, horses, tanks, and soldiers in gas masks, all realized in a vibrant color palette that could hardly be further from the teal and orange that’s saturated the last two entries in the series.

But what really turned heads was the decision to set the hit military shooter in World War 1. There have been precious few games to use “The Great War” as a backdrop, and it’s not a conflict that’s very well-understood in general. Particularly since Saving Private Ryan, movie-goers and gamers alike have had boatloads of modern-day material on the Second World War to pore over and play through.

You have to dig a bit deeper to find games that help put World War 1 in context. That’s partly because it’s a difficult war to portray in a way that makes sense in games. The causes and factions involved were complex and numerous, and with the dawn of industrialized warfare came many false starts and some of the most horrible carnage humanity has ever seen. Beginning in July, 1914 and lasting to November 11, 1918, estimates put the war’s death toll at about 11 million soldiers and 7 million civilians.