15 Spoiler-Free Tips To Help You Survive Ashen

about X hours ago from
15 Spoiler-Free Tips To Help You Survive Ashen

Ashen released earlier tonight and while we're still working on our review, we do have a few spoiler-free pointers to help you out during the game's opening hours. Here are 15 lessons to take to heart that will make the opening hours of the game much easier to weather.

1. If you're playing in single-player,  you have an A.I. partner. They're actually quite competent and powerful. Use them as bait during fights with tougher foes, attacking at your target's back when it's turned to you. Don't fret too much if your partner goes down, they'll revive later.

2. Prioritize side quests. They're called side quests but they're really essential to accessing the most powerful upgrades as well as the most interesting missions and characters.

Geoff Keighley Interview – Eyes On The Prize

about X hours ago from
Geoff Keighley Interview – Eyes On The Prize

Few people can say they started a career when they were still in high school, but Geoff Keighley knew what he wanted to do well before he had his driver’s license. From tester to journalist, he’s worn many hats in his long video game career, and is now the host of the Game Awards. I talked to Keighley about his lucky breaks and his continued fascination with games.
Take me back to your first video game memory. Were you hooked immediately?
My first experiences with games started when I was a kid. I remember my mother, who ran the books for my dad’s business in Toronto, always had an IBM PC in the office. When I was five years old, instead of going to piano lessons or anything like that, I went to computer classes. I went to this lady’s house where I learned to type and used programs like Reader Rabbit and Turtle Tracks. The first skill I learned was working on a computer. This was the ’80s, and computers were just starting to get into homes. I was the right age at the right time to start learning about them, and it was through the prism of education software. From there it grew to playing some of the early adventure games. I remember playing Willow from Lucasfilm and early Sierra games on an IBM PC in the family room. My brother and I would sit there and play games. We then got consoles from Sega and Nintendo.

Geoff Keighley Interview – Eyes On The Prize

about X hours ago from
Geoff Keighley Interview – Eyes On The Prize

Few people can say they started a career when they were still in high school, but Geoff Keighley knew what he wanted to do well before he had his driver’s license. From tester to journalist, he’s worn many hats in his long video game career, and is now the host of the Game Awards. I talked to Keighley about his lucky breaks and his continued fascination with games.
Take me back to your first video game memory. Were you hooked immediately?
My first experiences with games started when I was a kid. I remember my mother, who ran the books for my dad’s business in Toronto, always had an IBM PC in the office. When I was five years old, instead of going to piano lessons or anything like that, I went to computer classes. I went to this lady’s house where I learned to type and used programs like Reader Rabbit and Turtle Tracks. The first skill I learned was working on a computer. This was the ’80s, and computers were just starting to get into homes. I was the right age at the right time to start learning about them, and it was through the prism of education software. From there it grew to playing some of the early adventure games. I remember playing Willow from Lucasfilm and early Sierra games on an IBM PC in the family room. My brother and I would sit there and play games. We then got consoles from Sega and Nintendo.

You Don't Need To Play The First Rage To Understand Rage 2

about X hours ago from
You Don't Need To Play The First Rage To Understand Rage 2

One of the questions we had in our pockets when we flew to Stockholm to play Rage 2 for our cover story was whether or not you'd need to play the original game to understand the happenings of its sequel.  Set more than 20 years after the original game, id and Avalanche have endeavored to pay homage to the events of the original game while creating an adventure that's inviting to newcomers.

The simple answer is "No," you don't have to play Rage to appreciate Rage 2. Players start the game as a new protagonist named Walker (whose gender you can choose) who ventures to avenge the destruction of their home and stop the Authority. Despite the return of the original antagonists regime, Rage 2 is a self-contained story. However, Avalanche says there are tons of references and treats for those who played the original game and have fond memories of it, like the return of characters Loosum Hagar and John Marshall.

For more on Rage 2, be sure to check out our coverage hub by clicking on the banner below.

You Don't Need To Play The First Rage To Understand Rage 2

about X hours ago from
You Don't Need To Play The First Rage To Understand Rage 2

One of the questions we had in our pockets when we flew to Stockholm to play Rage 2 for our cover story was whether or not you'd need to play the original game to understand the happenings of its sequel.  Set more than 20 years after the original game, id and Avalanche have endeavored to pay homage to the events of the original game while creating an adventure that's inviting to newcomers.

The simple answer is "No," you don't have to play Rage to appreciate Rage 2. Players start the game as a new protagonist named Walker (whose gender you can choose) who ventures to avenge the destruction of their home and stop the Authority. Despite the return of the original antagonists regime, Rage 2 is a self-contained story. However, Avalanche says there are tons of references and treats for those who played the original game and have fond memories of it, like the return of characters Loosum Hagar and John Marshall.

For more on Rage 2, be sure to check out our coverage hub by clicking on the banner below.

January Cover Revealed – Rage 2

about X hours ago from
January Cover Revealed – Rage 2

The original Rage served as Id Software’s first foray into open-world games and while it was praised for fantastic visuals and engaging gunplay, few considered the game on par with the rest of Id’s classic franchises like Doom, Quake, and Wolfenstein. With Rage 2, the developer is looking to change that and create a memorable, zany shooter by teaming up with open-world experts Avalanche Studios (Just Cause). We journeyed to Avalanche Studios’ Stockholm office to explore Rage’s colorful “post-post apocalyptic” version of the Wasteland and got a taste of the wild weaponry and pulverizing powers. Here's a look at our two covers!

Our January issue dives into why we think this unexpected sequel is the most promising shooter on the horizon. As the first people outside of the developers to stomp around open world, we have exclusive impressions and information about the game’s weapons, powers, and story. Starting this week, we’ll also have exclusive online content to support our cover story including interviews, gameplay breakdowns, and more.

January Cover Revealed – Rage 2

about X hours ago from
January Cover Revealed – Rage 2

The original Rage served as Id Software’s first foray into open-world games and while it was praised for fantastic visuals and engaging gunplay, few considered the game on par with the rest of Id’s classic franchises like Doom, Quake, and Wolfenstein. With Rage 2, the developer is looking to change that and create a memorable, zany shooter by teaming up with open-world experts Avalanche Studios (Just Cause). We journeyed to Avalanche Studios’ Stockholm office to explore Rage’s colorful “post-post apocalyptic” version of the Wasteland and got a taste of the wild weaponry and pulverizing powers. Here's a look at our two covers!

Our January issue dives into why we think this unexpected sequel is the most promising shooter on the horizon. As the first people outside of the developers to stomp around the open world, we have exclusive impressions and information about the game’s weapons, powers, and story. Starting this week, we’ll also have exclusive online content to support our cover story including interviews, gameplay breakdowns, and more.

New Gameplay Today – Resident Evil 2 Remake

about X hours ago from
New Gameplay Today – Resident Evil 2 Remake

Sorry Jeff Cork isn't here, but we still love you guys and wanted to show off some great games today, so we recruited Imran Khan who just returned from a demo of Capcom's remake of Resident Evil 2. We talk about Capcom's return to the series roots, its renewed focus on puzzles, and how many headshots a zombie can take.

Imran is joined by Leo "Mud Pie" Vader and Ben "Shredder" Reeves. You know, just a bunch of boys playing games and having fun. You can also check out Imran's written impressions from the entire demo here.

Resident Evil 2 is scheduled for release on January 25 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. You have been warned.

New Gameplay Today – Resident Evil 2 Remake

about X hours ago from
New Gameplay Today – Resident Evil 2 Remake

Sorry Jeff Cork isn't here, but we still love you guys and wanted to show off some great games today, so we recruited Imran Khan who just returned from a demo of Capcom's remake of Resident Evil 2. We talk about Capcom's return to the series roots, its renewed focus on puzzles, and how many headshots a zombie can take.

Imran is joined by Leo "Mud Pie" Vader and Ben "Shredder" Reeves. You know, just a bunch of boys playing games and having fun. You can also check out Imran's written impressions from the entire demo here.

Resident Evil 2 is scheduled for release on January 25 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. You have been warned.

Tim Sweeney Answers Questions About The New Epic Games Store

about X hours ago from
Tim Sweeney Answers Questions About The New Epic Games Store

The PC game distribution business could experience a giant shakeup in the coming months and years following the news that Fortnite creator Epic Games has built its own store. This new developer-friendly model offers a dramatically more favorable revenue split than rival marketplaces like Steam, but beyond that, we still have questions about how this Epic Games Store operates. Who better to answer our questions than Epic Games founder Tim Sweeney? 

The PC marketplace already offers a lot of choice to gamers with Steam, GOG, the Microsoft store, etc. What market conditions led you to believe there is an opportunity for another storefront?

The 70% / 30% split was a breakthrough more than a decade ago with the advent of Steam, the Apple App Store, and Google Play. But today, digital software stores have grown into a $25,000,000,000+ business worldwide across all platforms, yet the economies of scale have not benefited developers. In our analysis, stores are marking up their costs 300% to 400%. We simply aim to give developers a better deal.