Here’s Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends’ New Character

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Here’s Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends’ New Character

Today, Apex Legends launches its first season and battle pass, as well as its first new playable Legend. Octane is an adrenaline-pumped athlete with mechanical legs and mad speed whose agility can be beneficial to your squad for more than a few reasons. He'll cost you 12,000 Legends Tokens or 750 Apex Coins to unlock.

Swift Mend (Passive) While not taking damage, Octane restores health over time.

Stim (Tactical)
Move 30% faster for 6 seconds. Costs health to use. Reduction to speed as the seconds go on.

Everything You Need To Know About System Shock

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Everything You Need To Know About System Shock

This feature was originally published online in December 2015.

Otherside Entertainment, currently developing the Kickstarted Underworld Ascendant, has revealed that they're developing a new entry in the System Shock series, the last of which was released in the tail end of 1999. Here's why that's a big deal.

Back in 1994 gaming was in a very different place. Game demos were passed around on floppy disks. Doom and Civilization ruled the world. Windows 95 wasn't even a thing yet. Looking Glass Technologies, which housed innovators like Warren Spector (Deux Ex), Doug Church (Thief) and Harvey Smith (Dishonored), was known for the revolutionary role-playing series Ultima and wanted to create an immersive simulation that wasn't fantasy-based. They opted for science fiction, and System Shock, a first-person adventure game that cast players as a hacker going up against an artificial intelligence known as SHODAN hell-bent on destroying Earth, was born.

This is How System Shock Came Back From The Dead

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This is How System Shock Came Back From The Dead

Otherside Entertainment just revealed a new look at System Shock 3 at this year's GDC. However, it's actually another company called Nightdive that's responsible for bringing the franchise back from the grave. Here's how they did it.  This feature originally appeared in issue 281 of Game Informer.

In 1994, a Cambridge-based developer named Looking Glass Technologies released System Shock, perhaps one of the most influential games of its time. The game combined first-person shooter with role-playing systems, encouraging the player to proceed with caution through a space station’s dangerous corridors and think carefully about their every move. In 1999, Looking Glass released a sequel shortly before closing its doors; Irrational Games, which worked on System Shock 2, carried on the design of the series with the critically acclaimed BioShock. Now nearly 13 years later, a Kickstarter for a remake of the original System Shock has raked in over a million dollars, and a third game in the series is being developed by a team made up largely of developers who worked on the original.

The roads behind the series’ sudden resurgence lead back to Nightdive Studios, a small and dedicated team that has, up until this point, dealt solely with acquiring older games, like Turok and The 7th Guest, and making them playable on modern PCs.

Skater XL Riding The Sometimes Rough Pre-Release Hype

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Skater XL Riding The Sometimes Rough Pre-Release Hype

I wasn’t sure what to expect when Skater XL hit Steam Early Access on PC late last year, but I was very impressed with the small gameplay slice I played at the time. Fast forward three months later and the game is in the same place it was back then. Well, it is and it isn't.

While the title hasn’t received a significant update yet, the game has blossomed nevertheless thanks to the dedication of modders who’ve added transition ramps, new levels, and more (check out the game's sub-reddit). This has put Skater XL in an uneasy position: Expectations are high because fans see the potential, but their craving for more content is making them restless.

Skater XL isn’t exactly the same as it was when I last played it last year (below is the New Gameplay Today episode we recorded at the time). Small updates have produced notable improvements in areas such as fixing some janky animations, making the board’s wheels move, smoothing transition landings, adding graphical touches, and more.

Skater XL Riding The Sometimes Rough Pre-Release Hype

about X hours ago from
Skater XL Riding The Sometimes Rough Pre-Release Hype

I wasn’t sure what to expect when Skater XL hit Steam Early Access on PC late last year, but I was impressed with the small gameplay slice I played at the time. Fast forward three months later and the game is in the same place it was back then. Well, it is and it isn't.

While the title hasn’t received a significant update yet, it has blossomed nevertheless thanks to the dedication of modders who’ve added transition ramps, new levels, and more (check out the game's sub-reddit). This has put Skater XL in an uneasy position: Expectations are high because fans see the potential, but their craving for more content is making them restless.

Skater XL isn’t exactly the same as it was when I last played it last year (below is the New Gameplay Today episode we recorded at the time). Small updates have produced notable improvements in areas such as fixing some janky animations, making the board’s wheels move, smoothing transition landings, adding graphical touches, and more.

The Wonderfully Weird Fiction Of Control

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The Wonderfully Weird Fiction Of Control

Control is set in an ever-shifting environment rife with mysteries, which makes it a fascinating backdrop for a story. Storytelling is far from a new beast for Remedy, who have dabbled in intertwining different mediums like TV into interactive tales. During our cover story trip, the team went in-depth with us about how they are approaching story this time by breaking the fourth wall, building a David Lynch-style world with questions that don’t always have answers, and finding new ways to explore transmedia approaches while also taking “reasonable steps back” in comparison to Quantum Break. 

Remedy considers Control to be part of the New Weird genre, a take on science fiction and fantasy that contradicts conventions, putting emphasis on the bizarre. According to narrative designer Brooke Maggs, the team took inspiration from Jeff VanderMeer’s novel Annihilation, as well as Mr. Robot, Inception, and Legion. Maggs explains that voiceover narration for protagonist Jesse plays a big role in Control, just like it did in Max Payne, but things are a bit different this time.

The Wonderfully Weird Fiction Of Control

about X hours ago from
The Wonderfully Weird Fiction Of Control

Control is set in an ever-shifting environment rife with mysteries, which makes it a fascinating backdrop for a story. Storytelling is far from a new beast for Remedy, who have dabbled in intertwining different mediums like TV into interactive tales. During our cover story trip, the team went in-depth with us about how they are approaching story this time by breaking the fourth wall, building a David Lynch-style world with questions that don’t always have answers, and finding new ways to explore transmedia approaches while also taking “reasonable steps back” in comparison to Quantum Break. 

Remedy considers Control to be part of the New Weird genre, a take on science fiction and fantasy that contradicts conventions, putting emphasis on the bizarre. According to narrative designer Brooke Maggs, the team took inspiration from Jeff VanderMeer’s novel Annihilation, as well as Mr. Robot, Inception, and Legion. Maggs explains that voiceover narration for protagonist Jesse plays a big role in Control, just like it did in Max Payne, but things are a bit different this time.

Pokémon Go Isn't Why The Detective Pikachu Movie Was Greenlit, But It Helped

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Pokémon Go Isn't Why The Detective Pikachu Movie Was Greenlit, But It Helped

In April 2018, we visited the set of the Pokémon Detective Pikachu movie and spoke with the producer, Cale Boyter, about what factors lead to live-action Pokémon movie finally coming into existence. The film was announced near the height of Pokémon Go's popularity, so the obvious assumption was that its popularity was what made Hollywood finally see the Pokémon property as a viable franchise worth adapting.

"It’s so funny because everyone assumes that Pokémon Go happened and that’s when we wanted the rights to Pokémon, but we’ve been in talks and trying to get to Pokémon for over five years now," Boyter says. "It was wonderful. It was a great coincidence that Pokémon Go happened, and it just so happened that that’s when we were finally figuring out the rights, but really it was driven by we love Pokémon and tempering the live action world was just this huge opportunity that had never happened."

Pokémon Go Isn't Why The Detective Pikachu Movie Was Greenlit, But It Helped

about X hours ago from
Pokémon Go Isn't Why The Detective Pikachu Movie Was Greenlit, But It Helped

In April 2018, we visited the set of the Pokémon Detective Pikachu movie and spoke with the producer, Cale Boyter, about what factors lead to live-action Pokémon movie finally coming into existence. The film was announced near the height of Pokémon Go's popularity, so the obvious assumption was that its popularity was what made Hollywood finally see the Pokémon property as a viable franchise worth adapting.

"It’s so funny because everyone assumes that Pokémon Go happened and that’s when we wanted the rights to Pokémon, but we’ve been in talks and trying to get to Pokémon for over five years now," Boyter says. "It was wonderful. It was a great coincidence that Pokémon Go happened, and it just so happened that that’s when we were finally figuring out the rights, but really it was driven by we love Pokémon and tempering the live action world was just this huge opportunity that had never happened."

Detective Pikachu's Cast And Director Share Their History With Pokémon

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Detective Pikachu's Cast And Director Share Their History With Pokémon

In April of 2018, after the announcement of the Pokémon Detective Pikachu movie, but before any trailers or visuals from the movie appeared online, we visited the set of the film in London and spoke with the film makers about their personal histories with Pokémon.

Rob Letterman has a history with animation and directed Goosebumps in 2015 and is the director for Pokémon Detective Pikachu. We asked him if he was familiar with Pokémon before taking the job.

Justice Smith is best know for his roles in The Get Down and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. In Pokémon Detective Pikachu, he plays protagonist Tim Goodman who partners with Pikachu to solve a mystery surrounding his father's murder.