Fractured But Whole's Developers Share Their Favorite Episodes Of South Park

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Ubisoft San Francisco is currently steeped in all things South Park, and as a result they've been watching the show – a lot. While at the studio for our cover story, we gathered up their favorite episodes.

Nicholas Bonardi – lead audio designer“I went through all of them recently when I was looking for more TV content. I really like the Mitch Connor stuff. The first Mitch Connor episodes are so great. Another one that sticks out in my head, 'F*** you whale! F*** you dolphin!'"

Scott Crisostomo – manager, game design“The one where Butters builds a town in the junkyard. That one and the Imaginationland episodes. Those are pretty good.”

Tune Into Our Titanfall 2 Campaign Stream Tomorrow

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Tune Into Our Titanfall 2 Campaign Stream Tomorrow

Titanfall 2 is set to be released on Friday. We dug the game a lot (check out our review here) and we're going to be streaming a good deal of the campaign tomorrow from 4-6 PM Central Time. 

Be sure to tune in and ask questions in the chat channel. I'll be at the controls and, having played the campaign multiple times, will probably be able to answer whatever questions you have.

See you then!

Dark Souls III's Ashes Of Ariandel DLC Is A Meaningless Addition

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Dark Souls III's Ashes Of Ariandel DLC Is A Meaningless Addition

One of Dark Souls III’s defining traits was acting as a sort of abridged version of the series. When you aren’t literally revisiting areas from previous games (like the trek through a new part of Anor Londo), you wander around facsimiles of them. These familiar encounters are retooled enough to play with your expectations, such as when the Jailers in the Irithyll dungeon (that resemble Demon’s Souls Mind Flayers) slowly reduce your maximum health instead of trying to kill you instantly with a powerful magic combo. At its best, Dark Souls III makes you nostalgic in the present, eliciting memories of the series’ best moments while offering some closure for longtime fans. By comparison, the Ashes of Ariandel DLC leaves me feeling empty and wondering why I came to it in the first place.

Ashes of Ariandel features a rather large snow-capped area with parallels to the first Dark Souls’ Painted World of Ariamis, two boss encounters, a variety of new weapons, a few new armor sets, and a handful of spells. The DLC is meant to be a late or post-game excursion (a message left on the ground by the developer advises you not to venture into the area until you beat Lothric Castle). But on its own, it doesn’t offer a compelling reason to return to a game that already had a satisfying conclusion. 

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Four Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Four Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

In the first episode we explore the city a little bit, make a friend with a fellow capsule toy collector, and get all our stuff stolen. There's also a lady who forgot to finish getting dressed who really likes her motorcycle. In episode two, we make some progress by giving a hungry guy who loves naps some money, and getting a job that's almost as cool as being a forklift driver. We punch a tree in episode three. In episode four we break a rock with our hand because a homeless porcupine asked us to.

Stay tuned for more episodes at some point, and leave us lots of comments! We'll probably read yours on the next episode.

The Many Game Easter Eggs Of Black Mirror’s “Playtest”

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The Many Game Easter Eggs Of Black Mirror’s “Playtest”

If you’re in the mood for a bleak exploration of the ways technology can lead to dystopia, look no further than Black Mirror. The show has transitioned to become a Netflix Original for its third season, and those newly crafted episodes have recently hit the popular streaming service. 

While most of Black Mirror’s episodes explore some aspect of technology as seen through the lens of a potential dark future, the second episode of season three should be of particular interest to the gaming public. “Playtest” is filled with carefully placed nods to the world of gaming; viewers with a background in games are likely to catch a bunch of subtle cues the show’s creators have thrown in. 

Here are some of the scenes, references, and details that made us smile as we made our way through the episode.

What To Expect From Skyrim Special Edition And Mods, From An Expert

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What To Expect From Skyrim Special Edition And Mods, From An Expert

When Bethesda announced the current-gen special edition Skyrim, it lit a fire underneath me. After jealously looking at screencaps of mods for the PC version of the game for years, I was going to dive into that scene myself. My new gaming machine could handle it, so the only thing holding me back was my complete ignorance of how it all worked. Fortunately, I stumbled onto a fantastic resource: Dirty Weasel Media’s extensive step-by-step video tutorials covering how to do it all in exhaustive detail. Cal’s YouTube channel is loaded with helpful tips and overviews of some of the biggest mods around, as well as alternative choices for people who want to stray from the path a little bit.    

Ask South Park's Developers Questions For An Upcoming Podcast

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Ask South Park's Developers Questions For An Upcoming Podcast

We hope you've been enjoying our month of exclusive features covering Ubisoft San Francisco's South Park: The Fractured But Whole. We've asked the developers of the game a lot of questions about the upcoming RPG, but we want to give the community a chance to have their burning questions answered as well. In an upcoming episode of The Game Informer Show, we'll be speaking with senior producer Jason Schroeder and director of design Paul Cross so please leave a comment below if you want to ask about the game's story, gameplay, or what it's like to work with South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker.

Ask us your best question in the comments below and subscribe to Game Informer's podcast to get ready for the upcoming episode!

To learn more about South Park: The Fractured But Whole, click on the banner below and stay up-to-date on our constantly updating hub of exclusive content.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Is No Man's Sky The Most Disappointing Game Of The Year?

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Science-Fiction Weekly – Is No Man's Sky The Most Disappointing Game Of The Year?

As 2016 winds to a close, and the bickering over what game should be awarded as the year’s best heats up, it's time to reflect on the events that shaped our favorite entertainment medium over the last 365 days – from gamers taking their first steps in virtual reality to a small studio in Guildford, England creating a digital universe filled with over 18 quintillion planets. My initial thoughts on 2016 are a little worrisome – nothing really stood out as a sea-change moment other than Pokémon Go getting people to go outside to throw balls at monsters. It has been a quiet year, dominated by sequels and great indie titles. VR hasn't moved the needle like we thought it would.

One of the loudest talking points is No Man’s Sky. Never before have I seen a game hit with such a swing of enthusiasm between announcement and release. Within the span of a day, it shifted from the most-anticipated game of the year to potentially the most disappointing and controversial.

Test Chamber – Why World Of Final Fantasy Is A Love Letter To Fans

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The Final Fantasy series tries to evolve and stay modern with each new installment, but World of Final Fantasy intentionally focuses on the past. By collecting iconic characters and monsters and using a traditional turn-based battle system, anyone with fond memories of this franchise should find something to enjoy here. 

Join Final Fantasy fanatics Joe Juba and Kim Wallace as they take a tour through the major beats of World of Final Fantasy, looking at classic creatures and talking about how the old-school battle system holds up. If you've played previous Final Fantasy games, you're bound to recognize a few faces.

Warning: We used a late-game save file for this video. It doesn't spoil any key story points, but it does reveal some monsters and abilities that you only get near the end. Proceed at your own risk!

Test Chamber – See Why Civilization VI Lives Up To The Legacy

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Test Chamber – See Why Civilization VI Lives Up To The Legacy

Civilization has been around for a long time. Okay, yes, that's obvious. But I mean Sid Meier's historical strategy game series that began in 1991. The latest entry, Civilization VI, stays true to the franchise's roots but makes some important tweaks to the established formula that make it an interesting game in its own right.

If you've never played a Civilization game, they can be daunting at first. There's a lot to take in, from military management and exploration, to founding religions and establishing culture. However, once you've got the basics down it's very easy to find that you've spent several hours after planning on only playing one more turn.

Watch Ben Reeves, Dan Tack, and I search for bananas and horses in the first few rounds of the brand new Civilization VI.