New Gameplay Today – Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's New DLC

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New Gameplay Today – Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's New DLC

Last night, Nintendo released the second of two planned DLC updates for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The Champions' Ballad adds new shrines, a dungeon, and several other fun new items. It's also kind of difficult, as Suriel proves in our new episode of New Gameplay Today. Fortunately, he has the support of Kyle, Leo, and me.

Suriel shows off the opening moments of the DLC, showing how players can get a pair of items that make it easier to keep track of your equine companion. Then we jump into a shrine – after using the Champions' Ballad's new gimmick weapon, the One-Hit Obliterator. As cool as the weapon sounds, it also makes Link exceedingly vulnerable. Suriel learns this the hard way.

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Exclusive Mega Man 11 Concept Art Gallery

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Exclusive Mega Man 11 Concept Art Gallery

For Mega Man 11, Capcom is updating the Blue Bomber’s iconic design. However, the character has a 30-year history, and fans have come to expect a certain look from the Mega Man franchise. We spoke with artist Yuji Ishihara about how he gave Mega Man 11 its anime-inspired look while holding true to the series history.

On Mega Man's New Design: “We were going for more 3D look, so I felt like I should include more details to really show off that he is a robot. One of the biggest changes is the separation of the joints in the wrist and ankle. I noticed that anytime people draw fan art of Mega Man, the anatomy of drawing the hand with the entire wrist and arm was difficult. With the separation, I figured that if I’m fortunate enough to have people draw fan art of this version of Mega Man, they would have an easier time.”

New Gameplay Today – Heartstone's Kobolds And Catacombs Mode

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New Gameplay Today – Heartstone's Kobolds And Catacombs Mode

Blizzard released Hearthstone's new single-player mode Kobolds and Catacombs today, which lets players take a randomized, expanding deck on a roguelike journey. Dan Tack is a big fan of what he's played, so he took Leo Vader and me on what we thought would be a quick tour through the mode. It ended up being our longest ever episode of New Gameplay Today. Did he make it through to the end? You'll have to watch and find out.

Seriously, I'm not going to tell you whether or not he defeated the run of eight bosses, each more difficult than the last. Want to know if his selections of cards and passive abilities paid off? Seriously, I'm not going to say here. You'll have to watch the video below. Sheesh!

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Soma’s Safe Mode Proves Horror Games Can Work Without Danger

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Soma’s Safe Mode Proves Horror Games Can Work Without Danger

Horror games rely on conflict. Grotesque, bloody monsters are often front-and-center, and your relationship to them (whether it involves gunning them down with limited ammo or sneaking by them unharmed) is how horror games instill dread and fear into players. With the addition of “Safe Mode,” Soma (Amnesia: The Dark Descent developer Frictional Games’ 2015 follow-up) challenges that idea, opting to let players remove monster encounters entirely and focus on explorimg underwater station Pathos-11 at their leisure. The mode isn’t without faults, but is ultimately the way to go while also proving horror games don’t have to test players to entertain them.

Although Soma is one of my favorite games of 2015, its monsters frustrated me. Soma’s story, which raises questions about the nature of A.I., consciousness, and end-of-the-world scenarios through insightful conversations between characters, moves at a brisk pace. These conversations, their implications, and how developer Frictional Games weaves them into interactive moments not only deepen the atmosphere, but offer terrifying mental spaces for players to venture into without resorting to gore or violence. But having to crawl into vents and wait for monsters to walk by didn’t mesh with these threads, and slowed down the momentum of the plot. 

The Virtual Life – Five Relaxing Games To Play During Stressful Times

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The Virtual Life – Five Relaxing Games To Play During Stressful Times

The holidays are upon us and it's great, right? Snow. Seeing family. Exchanging gifts, if you're into that sort of thing. However, there's also a load of small-time stressors that appear during these jovial times, particularly for those of us doomed to sit in airports for long hours thanks to weather delays. Here are a handful of charming, low-key games you can play to calm the nerves.

Abzû A joyful sea exploration adventure from several people who worked on Journey, Abzû  puts you in the flippers of a diver exploring a beautiful underwater world teeming with life. A beautiful and compact adventure, Abzû  won us over, with reviewer Matthew Kato saying "Abzû is a game of mysteries and its world will move you to muse the beauty of life and our place in it. It contains moments that transcend the simple act of playing a video game by making a connection with the beings around you – a profound experience."
Platforms: PS4, Xbox One, PC
Check it out if: The sea is your thing. You love beautiful art.

Exclusive Interview With Mega Man 11's Creators

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Exclusive Interview With Mega Man 11's Creators

This week we were excited to reveal Game Informer's January cover story is on Mega Man 11. We spent two days at Capcom's headquarters in Osaka, playing the game and speaking with the game's new development team. The two lead developers on the new game are producer Kazuhiro Tsuchiya and game director Koji Oda. We sat down with Tsuchiya and Oda to figure out what Mega Man 11 means for Capcom and the team's approach to sustaining versus reinventing the series' classic gameplay.

Watch the video below to learn from Mega Man 11's lead developers what it takes to revive a classic franchise.

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Eleven Things We Learned While Playing Mega Man 11

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Eleven Things We Learned While Playing Mega Man 11

The Mega Man formula hasn’t changed much in 30 years, which is a testament to the strength of its original concept. During our trip to Capcom’s headquarters for our recent Mega Man 11 cover story, we had the chance to play through two stages of the game. Here are the 11 things we learned during our hands-on time.

1) Same Mega, new lookSince Mega Man 9 and 10 both paid homage to Mega Man’s roots with an 8-bit inspired art style, Mega Man 11 is delivering a more modern anime-inspired look.

2) Pick eight
In classic Mega Man tradition, players will get to choose which of Mega Man 11’s robot masters they will tackle first, and they can choose from all eight robot masters right out of the gate.

The Sports Desk – UFC 3 Beta Impressions

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The Sports Desk – UFC 3 Beta Impressions

EA Sports has put out a public beta test for UFC 3 (full game out February 2 for PS4 and Xbox One), giving everyone a first look at the title's new gameplay for stamina, combos, strike interruptions and more. As a first-time UFC player, I jumped into the beta and tried to make sense of it all.

Having played EA Sports' Fight Night franchise, as well as other traditional sports games from the company, I was curious how I'd adapt to the title's gameplay, which is more like a fighter than anything else. UFC 3 is in a tough spot requiring a control scheme that's more complex than Fight Night's analog-stick punching, with situational flexibility as well as accommodating the ground game and submissions.

Replay – Haunting Ground

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Replay – Haunting Ground

Capcom's storied history of survival-horror games extends far beyond Resident Evil. In 2005, Capcom released a game called Haunting Ground on PlayStation 2, which begins with the controversial scenario of waking up in an unknown place, imprisoned, and without clothes. The uncomfortable intro gives way to gameplay survival-horror fans know oh so well, fleeing for your life, and solving puzzles to open doors and reveal useful items. In this episode of Replay we check out this little-known Capcom title, which was slammed by Game Informer back in the day, scoring a 4.75 out of 10.

In our 40 minutes with the game, we may like it more now than our critics did. Of course, we are only scratching the surface of what this game offers. We didn't get to see how the dog is integrated into the gameplay design.

This episode's second segment is older and far more shocking. Thanks again for watching and all of the support for seven-plus years. We'll see you in seven days!