The Public Tells Us Why Pokémon Go Is A Hit

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In cities across the globe, you can't walk down the street without seeing a stranger trying to track down a Pokémon. But do people actually enjoy it? And what happens when we put their Pokémon knowledge to the test? Senior Editor Ben Reeves dares to find out.

For more intense guerrilla journalism, check out our other man-on-the-street videos about the Xbox One versus the PlayStation 4 or who develops Call of Duty.

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Exploring The Best Video Game Soundtracks On Vinyl

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A great game can be made even better with a standout soundtrack, and most audiophiles agree vinyl is the best way to experience the music you love. The medium has gone through a bit of a resurgence in popularity over the past few years, and some incredible packages have been put together to bring some of the best video game soundtracks of all time to your turntable. Here are a few of our favorites.

If these releases get you thinking about starting your own video game vinyl collection, you're in luck. We have partnered with Iam8Bit to give away a number of records, including signed versions of the Uncharted: Nathan Drake Collection, FTL, Guild Wars 2, and Dustforce soundtracks. To be eligible to win one of these records, leave a comment below telling us all about your favorite video game soundtrack!

Rocket LeagueThis recently announced release is a great collection for fans of the insanely popular sports game. The limited edition first run of 1,000 copies features records with artwork of various tires and wheels available in game. A pre-order of the triple LP package grants you a digital copy of the full soundtrack immediately, featuring a variety of artists.

Changing The Script: A List Of Hacks And Attacks In Games

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Changing The Script: A List Of Hacks And Attacks In Games

Like athletes turning to performance drugs to gain an edge, gamers have long been hacking and exploiting games to win. Today, a Pokémon Go player became the first player to reach the level cap, later revealing this feat was accomplished using a bot. Almost every Call of Duty and Battlefield game have had problems with hackers (or simply players using hacks or exploits passed around or found online) using aimbots and other methods to cheat. Overwatch is the latest victim. Sometimes hacks can be used to discover pieces of games that the developer never meant us to see. Other times people can alter the game to harm players or the services provided.

The list below is a wide exploration of the different attacks, hacks, and tweaks people have used to change or affect games. Not all of them are bad, mind you. A hack was even used in a clever way for a marriage proposal.

The Virtual Life: Why We Need Games Like Kentucky Route Zero

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The Virtual Life: Why We Need Games Like Kentucky Route Zero

Explaining Kentucky Route Zero (KRZ) to someone who hasn't played it is a surprisingly difficult task. At first glance, KRZ looks like a typical narrative-focused adventure game. There are pretty backgrounds. You click objects a lot. The characters are on a journey; sometimes they talk to each other. However, things get a bit odder and more wondrous the deeper you dig into this interactive tale.

Test Chamber – Challenging The Arena In The Elder Scrolls: Legends Beta

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Bethesda's The Elder Scrolls: Legends is still in a beta state, but we decided to hone our Khajiit senses and slink into the action before full release.

Featuring a single-player campaign, traditional player-vs-player duels, and both single and multiplayer "arena" options where players form the best deck they can with random selections of cards, the digital collectible card game is already boasting a good variety of activities.

Lane mechanics and the "prophecy" ability add some interesting foibles to the mix while players who are familiar with card games will be able to dive right in without much difficulty. There's a lot more to it, so check out some arena battling with Dan Tack, Ben Reeves, and Wade Wojcik as they explore The Elder Scrolls: Legends (Beta!) in this episode of Test Chamber!

Test Chamber – We Threw Away Our Joy Pills To Play We Happy Few

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Test Chamber – We Threw Away Our Joy Pills To Play We Happy Few

We Happy Few received an early access release today, so we decided to take the unfinished game for a spin and see if it makes us want to take joy pills.

Jeff Cork and I show off a little bit of the prologue that was shown off at E3, but then jump right into the action. For many, the game is likely not what they will expect. The game's opening implies a narrative-driven experience in a strange world recalling games like BioShock, but it's actually a survival game with roguelike and procedural level generation. For some of our early impressions, and a glance at the gameplay, check out the video below.

For our E3 impressions of the game, head here.

Where’s My Sequel? – Marvel Ultimate Alliance

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The original Marvel Ultimate Alliance games returned to modern-day gaming platforms today, and it got us thinking about the broader franchise and its significant potential. In Where’s My Sequel, we take a look at franchises that deserve to be ongoing, and Marvel’s engaging action and role-playing hybrid is primed for a reappearance.

Marvel Ultimate Alliance was itself an evolution from the successful X-Men Legends games, an action/RPG that starred the familiar team of mutant super heroes. Those earlier projects tapped the isometric action vibe of games like Diablo and Baldur’s Gate: Dark Alliance, but looked to comics and superpowers instead of D&D and magic for inspiration. Comic fans, in particular, loved all the nods to the broader fiction, which saw interactions with popular characters and visits to iconic locations.

The 2006 release of Marvel Ultimate Alliance, from developer Raven Software, upped the ante on both presentation and the intensity of the action, with more sophisticated and detailed environments and power effects, and battles that felt fast and intense, thanks to some additional enemy variety.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Trek Beyond Review, Han Solo Trilogy

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Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Trek Beyond Review, Han Solo Trilogy

In one of Star Trek Beyond's rare, quieter moments, captain James T. Kirk turns to first officer Spock and says, "We make a good team." Spock pauses for a second, before calmly replying, "I believe we do." This brief exchange, which is meant to show genuine bonding between two crew members who have developed a friendship in near cataclysmic times, is awkward to the point that it doesn't feel right, a prevailing sentiment echoed throughout most of the film. Actors Chris Pine (Kirk) and Zachary Quinto (Spock) didn't butcher this scene; the unease is intentional, as we learn both characters are holding secrets from the other. Director Justin Lin and writer Simon Pegg, who also plays chief engineer Scotty, handles the character ensemble well, juggling classic personality traits Trek fans have come to expect with new wrinkles that make each character more interesting and worth following. However, the time allotted with each character is rarely satisfactory, truncated into short snippets that are often lost amid the loud and overly long action sequences – some are exciting and suspenseful, while others are goofy to the point of almost smacking of parody.

The Virtual Life: Why We Need Games Like Kentucky Route Zero

about X hours ago from

Explaining Kentucky Route Zero (KRZ) to someone who hasn't played it is a surprisingly difficult task. At first glance, KRZ looks like a typical narrative-focused adventure game. There are pretty backgrounds. You click objects a lot. The characters are on a journey; sometimes they talk to each other. However, things get a bit odder and more wondrous the deeper you dig into this interactive tale.

Five Video Game Franchises That Lost Their Way

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When do you let go of a series and stop having faith? Nearly every franchise has its duds, but at some point bad entries aren't an anomaly anymore, they're a trend. When fans are frequently getting burned, it's reasonable they'd start questioning their loyalty, even if they long for the glory days of yore. Here are five long-running series that are no longer providing fans much reason to stick around except for blind faith that next time things will be different.

Tony HawkWhere it went wrong: Tony Hawk Ride (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii)

PlayStation gamers were introduced to Tony Hawk's Pro Skater way back in 1999, and the whole experience was magical. Not only were the movements and tricks silky-smooth for the time, but the punk-oriented soundtrack featuring bands like Primus and Dead Kennedys was top-of-the-line. Activision took the success of THPS and ran with it; developer Neversoft created one of the best games of the era in Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2. As time went on, the series' quality gradually declined, though Tony Hawk's Project 8 did introduce some interesting new mechanics. Soon afterward, developer Robomodo was handed the reins to the series. That's when it face-planted.