Comparing The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim PS3 To Special Edition On PS4

about X hours ago from
Comparing The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim PS3 To Special Edition On PS4

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition has been out in the wild for a few days now, giving us a chance to experience its snowy fantasy world all over again – but how improved is the game?

One way to try and answer this question is to literally place two versions of the game side by side. We played through the first 25 minutes of the game on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4, trying to sync them up to the best of our ability. The framerate is definitely improved, but as the video shows, the visuals were pretty dang good on the previous generation of consoles. There is definitely some improvement there, but it's maybe not as drastic as we hoped it might be.

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How To Earn Your Flying License In Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2

about X hours ago from
How To Earn Your Flying License In Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2

Earning your flying license in Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 is no t a complicated or hidden process, but it is something many will be curious about when they start the game.

When you first start Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2, its hub area Conton City is open, but only to the locations you can reach by foot. You can fast-travel where you need to go, but seeing others fly around without a care in the world leads to jealousy quickly.

In the game's opening animated introduction, it warns you about the dangers of flying around in Conton City, alerting you that a flying license is necessary. To get one, you must play through the story and defeat Frieza and his brother Cooler. Once you do that, you are free to fly wherever you please, and can even unlock locations that were previously unreachable. I was about level 30 when I obtained my flying license, and I never looked back.

How To Earn Your Flying License In Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2

about X hours ago from
How To Earn Your Flying License In Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2

Earning your flying license in Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 is no t a complicated or hidden process, but it is something many will be curious about when they start the game.

When you first start Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2, its hub area Conton City is open, but only to the locations you can reach by foot. You can fast-travel where you need to go, but seeing others fly around without a care in the world leads to jealousy quickly.

In the game's opening animated introduction, it warns you about the dangers of flying around in Conton City, alerting you that a flying license is necessary. To get one, you must play through the story and defeat Freeza and his brother Cooler. Once you do that, you are free to fly wherever you please, and can even unlock locations that were previously unreachable. I was about level 30 when I obtained my flying license, and I never looked back.

Opinion – Unfriendly Controls Can Make Horror Games Better

about X hours ago from

It’s a familiar experience: you start up a new game, and something feels weird. Actions aren’t happening at the right time or the right speed. Something’s off with the way your character turns. The controls just feel bad.

"Bad controls" usually mean we’re not getting feedback that matches what we’re seeing or doing. Games have developed an established control language over the years, which most gamers have already internalized. Spacebar means jump, the right trigger means shoot. When a game doesn’t follow these unwritten rules, it’s jarring and difficult to readapt.

Dark Souls felt bizarre and unfriendly in my hands when I first picked it up, and my initial steps through that game were all the more frightening because of how alien the control scheme was. I inched my way forward, in part because I quickly learned that Dark Souls enjoys hiding enemies behind blind corners, but mostly because I wasn’t sure I’d react properly when I got attacked.

Opinion – Unfriendly Controls Can Make Horror Games Better

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Unfriendly Controls Can Make Horror Games Better

It’s a familiar experience: you start up a new game, and something feels weird. Actions aren’t happening at the right time or the right speed. Something’s off with the way your character turns. The controls just feel bad.

"Bad controls" usually mean we’re not getting feedback that matches what we’re seeing or doing. Games have developed an established control language over the years, which most gamers have already internalized. Spacebar means jump, the right trigger means shoot. When a game doesn’t follow these unwritten rules, it’s jarring and difficult to readapt.

Dark Souls felt bizarre and unfriendly in my hands when I first picked it up, and my initial steps through that game were all the more frightening because of how alien the control scheme was. I inched my way forward, in part because I quickly learned that Dark Souls enjoys hiding enemies behind blind corners, but mostly because I wasn’t sure I’d react properly when I got attacked.

Place Of Residing Evil: Looking Back At Capcom’s Original Survival Horror

about X hours ago from
Place Of Residing Evil: Looking Back At Capcom’s Original Survival Horror

Tokuro Fujiwara didn’t play video games; he didn’t even know that Konami was a game developer when he walked into the studio to apply for a product planner job he’d heard about through a college recruiter. However, Fujiwara excelled at game development. After breaking into the industry at Konami, Fujiwara moved over to Capcom, where he created Ghosts ‘n Goblins and Bionic Commando before working on other 8-bit classics such as Strider, DuckTales, and Mega Man 2.

Fujiwara’s most significant contribution to the gaming industry, however, might be an often-overlooked RPG for Nintendo’s first console that never officially released outside Japan. Entitled Sweet Home, Fujiwara’s project sounds like a game bound for obscurity; it was an adaptation of a low-budget Japanese horror film that served as an early experiment in video game horror. In spite of all this, Sweet Home became a cult hit and went on to inspire the Resident Evil franchise as well as the entire survival horror genre.

Place Of Residing Evil: Looking Back At Capcom’s Original Survival Horror

about X hours ago from
Place Of Residing Evil: Looking Back At Capcom’s Original Survival Horror

Tokuro Fujiwara didn’t play video games; he didn’t even know that Konami was a game developer when he walked into the studio to apply for a product planner job he’d heard about through a college recruiter. However, Fujiwara excelled at game development. After breaking into the industry at Konami, Fujiwara moved over to Capcom, where he created Ghosts ‘n Goblins and Bionic Commando before working on other 8-bit classics such as Strider, DuckTales, and Mega Man 2.

Fujiwara’s most significant contribution to the gaming industry, however, might be an often-overlooked RPG for Nintendo’s first console that never officially released outside Japan. Entitled Sweet Home, Fujiwara’s project sounds like a game bound for obscurity; it was an adaptation of a low-budget Japanese horror film that served as an early experiment in video game horror. In spite of all this, Sweet Home became a cult hit and went on to inspire the Resident Evil franchise as well as the entire survival horror genre.

Top Of The Table – The Best Games For Halloween

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – The Best Games For Halloween

Maybe trick-or-treating isn’t your thing, but you still want to do something fun with friends to celebrate the spookiest time of the year. Might I suggest a dedicated Halloween board game night? A few candles and a spooky background soundtrack can get you well on your way, but the most important ingredient is the right game. I’m here to help, with eight of my favorite games for a Halloween gaming get-together. 

Top Of The Table – The Best Games For Halloween

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – The Best Games For Halloween

Maybe trick-or-treating isn’t your thing, but you still want to do something fun with friends to celebrate the spookiest time of the year. Might I suggest a dedicated Halloween board game night? A few candles and a spooky background soundtrack can get you well on your way, but the most important ingredient is the right game. I’m here to help, with eight of my favorite games for a Halloween gaming get-together. 

Here They Lie’s Creative Director Talks Horror, Influences, And Working On Spec Ops: The Line

about X hours ago from

Cory Davis and horror go way back. Since he was a child, he’s been fascinated with the way horror can elicit emotions other genres can’t. “Horror’s a place where you can have a big influence and impact on the emotions that someone is feeling.” After being surprised by how well Davis’ most recent game, Here They Lie, managed to use the realm of VR to craft a powerful horror experience, I caught up with Davis to talk about his history with the genre, working on different kinds of horror, and some of the difficulties of creating a horror game in VR.

Of Dodgeball And F.E.A.R.In his younger years, Davis immersed himself in the works of H.P. Lovecraft and Stanley Kubrick, obsessing over their freakish monsters and unreal, twisted locations. But even at that early stage, Davis understood Lovecraft’s best scares had little to do with physical monsters; the philosophical questions those stories posed consistently inspired his creativity. “That’s where I always went when I wanted to have an experience and question something in my life. Horror was always the place that I went to.”