9 Video Game Plot Twists Hidden In Plain Sight

about X hours ago from
9 Video Game Plot Twists Hidden In Plain Sight

Spoilers are an issue with trailers and pre-release promotion today, but rarely are they used to enhance the experience. Usually, trailers give away the final shot, cameos and plot twists. On top of that, games coverage is so comprehensive that very little is left to the imagination by the time a title comes out. On the opposite end of the spectrum, spoilers can be hidden right under your nose via clever box art and smart storytelling. There are times when the promotional material—such as trailers, posters, and box art—contain the biggest spoilers, with you never knowing until you have context. Below are some of the games that had major spoilers and plot points that were under our nose the whole time.

Warning: Spoilers for all the following games!

Developers Weigh In On Octopath Traveler's Partial Spoken Dialogue

about X hours ago from
Developers Weigh In On Octopath Traveler's Partial Spoken Dialogue

I'm currently on a role-playing game kick. My time is divided between Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom, which I'm approximately 60 hours into, and Octopath Traveler, which I just began a day ago. The two games couldn't be more different in tone, story, or gameplay, but I'm finding both are jarring for the same odd reason: only a portion of their stories feature spoken dialogue. I know this isn't a new thing that is happening in games. RPGs in particular have been offering a mix of spoken dialogue and written text for decades, but Octopath Traveler's handling of it is oddly irritating.

Bouncing from a long sequence with spoken dialogue to city exploration without any isn't the problem. That actually works fine. A clean transition is made. Most RPGs figure out the best points to use it or not. Octopath Traveler's problem is that won't shut up when the quiet sequences arrive. In these moments, characters offer just one or two words (and maybe even a grunt) instead of saying their lines. The back and forth between people talking ends up being unintentionally comedic given how little their are verbalizing.

Developers Weigh In On Octopath Traveler's Partial Spoken Dialogue

about X hours ago from
Developers Weigh In On Octopath Traveler's Partial Spoken Dialogue

I'm currently on a role-playing game kick. My time is divided between Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom, which I'm approximately 60 hours into, and Octopath Traveler, which I just began a day ago. The two games couldn't be more different in tone, story, or gameplay, but I'm finding both are jarring for the same odd reason: only a portion of their stories feature spoken dialogue. I know this isn't a new thing that is happening in games. RPGs in particular have been offering a mix of spoken dialogue and written text for decades, but Octopath Traveler's handling of it is oddly irritating.

Bouncing from a long sequence with spoken dialogue to city exploration without any isn't the problem. That actually works fine. A clean transition is made. Most RPGs figure out the best points to use it or not. Octopath Traveler's problem is that won't shut up when the quiet sequences arrive. In these moments, characters offer just one or two words (and maybe even a grunt) instead of saying their lines. The back and forth between people talking ends up being unintentionally comedic given how little their are verbalizing.

The Latest On Skateboarding Sensation Session

about X hours ago from
The Latest On Skateboarding Sensation Session

Montreal's Crea-ture Studios grabbed the world's attention with their skateboarding game Session at E3 when Microsoft showcased the title during their press conference. Session is coming to the Xbox One and PC, and will be in Steam Early Access and the Xbox Game Preview program in late 2018, with the first version of the title in 2019.

I met with some of the dev team at E3, and asked them about some additional game details since we covered it late last year.

Since we last saw the game, a mid-spin catch mechanic has been added, which is just the start of how the game is going to continue to evolve until it hits Early Access and beyond. At that time Crea-ture says it wants the game to be "almost perfect" despite being an Early Access title. Having said that, it doesn't intend for the feature set to be locked at that time per se, but it will continue to add bits and work on what's currently there. One of the examples of this is the game's skater customization feature, which has already grown. There are plans to allow you to change the tightness of your trucks, board concave and width, and more.

The Latest On Skateboarding Sensation Session

about X hours ago from
The Latest On Skateboarding Sensation Session

Montreal's Crea-ture Studios grabbed the world's attention with their skateboarding game Session at E3 when Microsoft showcased the title during their press conference. Session is coming to the Xbox One and PC, and will be in Steam Early Access and the Xbox Game Preview program in late 2018, with the first version of the title in 2019.

I met with some of the dev team at E3, and asked them about some additional game details since we covered it late last year.

Since we last saw the game, a mid-spin catch mechanic has been added, which is just the start of how the game is going to continue to evolve until it hits Early Access and beyond. At that time Crea-ture says it wants the game to be "almost perfect" despite being an Early Access title. Having said that, it doesn't intend for the feature set to be locked at that time per se, but it will continue to add bits and work on what's currently there. One of the examples of this is the game's skater customization feature, which has already grown. There are plans to allow you to change the tightness of your trucks, board concave and width, and more.

Fortnite's Motion Controls On Switch Are Finicky, But Not Impossible To Use

about X hours ago from
Fortnite's Motion Controls On Switch Are Finicky, But Not Impossible To Use

During E3 in June, Fortnite released on Switch, and it's a solid port. After spending time with it, however, I wondered how it would play with the aid (or hindrance, depending who you ask) of motion controls.

Realistically I don’t know if I would use it, or if it would help my aim, but I would like to try Fortnite with motion controls. I would want them to function a bit like Breath of the Wild where they would only turn on when you aim down sights. Okay, bye!

On July 12, Fortnite made it clear it was also curious about motion controls and updated the Switch version of the game to include them, so I decided to try them out.

Fortnite's Motion Controls On Switch Are Finicky, But Not Impossible To Use

about X hours ago from
Fortnite's Motion Controls On Switch Are Finicky, But Not Impossible To Use

During E3 in June, Fortnite released on Switch, and it's a solid port. After spending time with it, however, I wondered how it would play with the aid (or hindrance, depending who you ask) of motion controls.

Realistically I don’t know if I would use it, or if it would help my aim, but I would like to try Fortnite with motion controls. I would want them to function a bit like Breath of the Wild where they would only turn on when you aim down sights. Okay, bye!

On July 12, Fortnite made it clear it was also curious about motion controls and updated the Switch version of the game to include them, so I decided to try them out.

I Want An Akira Video Game

about X hours ago from
I Want An Akira Video Game

30 years ago today, the film adaptation of the manga, Akira, released in theaters in Japan. The legacy of both the film and the manga are important and far-reaching, both in the broader science-fiction landscape, and the cultural acceptance of anime across the world. You can see its influence in video games, but direct adaptations of the property are non-existent in North America and disappointing in Japan. I wrote this feature back in December 2012, but my desire for a video game based in Neo-Tokyo are as strong as ever on the film's 30th anniversary.

Akira (Amiga/CD32, 1994)

One of my favorite movies and comics of all time is Akira. I got my anime feet wet with Dragon Ball Z when I was young, but Akira was the first time I realized of what the medium was capable. After watching the movie dozens of times, I pursued the comics, and then watched the movie a dozen more times. Neo-Tokyo is one of my favorite fictional worlds, and the abrasive dynamic between friends Tetsuo and Kaneda has always fascinated me. I don’t know if it would work in a video game, but I would love to see somebody try.

I Want An Akira Video Game

about X hours ago from
I Want An Akira Video Game

30 years ago today, the film adaptation of the manga, Akira, released in theaters in Japan. The legacy of both the film and the manga are important and far-reaching, both in the broader science-fiction landscape, and the cultural acceptance of anime across the world. You can see its influence in video games, but direct adaptations of the property are non-existent in North America and disappointing in Japan. I wrote this feature back in December 2012, but my desire for a video game based in Neo-Tokyo are as strong as ever on the film's 30th anniversary.

Akira (Amiga/CD32, 1994)

One of my favorite movies and comics of all time is Akira. I got my anime feet wet with Dragon Ball Z when I was young, but Akira was the first time I realized of what the medium was capable. After watching the movie dozens of times, I pursued the comics, and then watched the movie a dozen more times. Neo-Tokyo is one of my favorite fictional worlds, and the abrasive dynamic between friends Tetsuo and Kaneda has always fascinated me. I don’t know if it would work in a video game, but I would love to see somebody try.

Beat The Heat With Gaming's Best Versions Of Hell

about X hours ago from
Beat The Heat With Gaming's Best Versions Of Hell

In the summer, we do things that cool us off. That’s just conventional wisdom. We jump in lakes and lay in front of fans and eat gazpacho. Suggest hot chocolate in July and people scoff. But what if we’ve been going about it all wrong? What if the solution is leaning in to the heat, diving into even hotter activities to show the summer we’re not scared? What if doubling down on heat is the ultimate life hack?

Welcome to hell – at least, the video game version. Games are all about escaping to impossible places, like the beautiful mountains of Skyrim, or the creepy caves of Brinstar, or in a surprising amount of cases, the bowels of Hell itself.

Just like video game designers, I understand the appeal of hell. Sure it’s a life of extremes, but at least there’s no faffing around with the banality of everyday life. There’s probably less, “Oh it’s Tuesday again, do I have rice or quinoa tonight?” in hell. Plus, it’s a dry heat.