Ranking Every Type In Pokémon From Worst To Best

about X hours ago from
Ranking Every Type In Pokémon From Worst To Best

One of the most crucial parts of learning Pokémon is understanding types. Like fighting game matchups, some Pokémon completely trounce others, and knowing which pocket monster to sic on your enemies at the right time can be the difference between becoming a Pokémon champion and losing to that cocky rival of yours.

But not all types are created equal. Although Pokémon games are usually balanced enough to make sure all types have their uses, Game Freak will never fix the issue where some Pokémon types are just cooler than others. 

We’ve ranked every type of Pokémon from least cool to coolest. If you’re using this list to gauge how cool your current Sun & Moon party is, take the average ranking of every type your Pokémon is, divide it by four, then stop using this list as a way to measure how cool your Pokémon party is.

Replay – The Jaguar Disaster

about X hours ago from
Replay – The Jaguar Disaster

Released two years before the PlayStation, Atari's Jaguar console had a lot going for it: A cool name, Atari brand recognition, and technical superiority. It was rendering 64-bit graphics three years before the Nintendo 64. Its games, however, left a lot to be desired.

It had some quality software, like Aliens vs. Predator, good ports of Doom and Wolfenstein, and Iron Soldier (which we take a look at in the episode), but for the most part its library was underwhelming. Today on Replay, with our bellies thoroughly filled with turkey, Andrew Reiner, Dan Tack, Brian Shea, and I look at the games that brought the system down, whether it be poor Mortal Kombat impersonators, an awful Kart Racer, or an incredibly difficult Bruce Lee game.

For more broad looks at failed consoles, check out our TurboGrafx-16 and Philips CD-i.

Replay – The Jaguar Disaster

about X hours ago from
Replay – The Jaguar Disaster

Released two years before the PlayStation, Atari's Jaguar console had a lot going for it: A cool name, Atari brand recognition, and technical superiority. It was rendering 64-bit graphics three years before the Nintendo 64. Its games, however, left a lot to be desired.

It had some quality software, like Aliens vs. Predator, good ports of Doom and Wolfenstein, and Iron Soldier (which we take a look at in the episode), but for the most part its library was underwhelming. Today on Replay, with our bellies thoroughly filled with turkey, Andrew Reiner, Dan Tack, Brian Shea, and I look at the games that brought the system down, whether it be poor Mortal Kombat impersonators, an awful Kart Racer, or an incredibly difficult Bruce Lee game.

For more broad looks at failed consoles, check out our TurboGrafx-16 and Philips CD-i.

Letting Players Tell The Story: Simulation Games As Narrative Machines

about X hours ago from
Letting Players Tell The Story: Simulation Games As Narrative Machines

The settlement began with what can only be described as cautious optimism. The dwarfs made quick progress building their new mountain home during the first year despite the herds of vicious elephants outside. They found an underground stream that allowed them to irrigate indoor farms and began work on some rudimentary fortifications. But there were warning signs for what was to come. Worryingly, the name of the site they had chosen for their new settlement was Boatmurdered.

Letting Players Tell The Story: Simulation Games As Narrative Machines

about X hours ago from
Letting Players Tell The Story: Simulation Games As Narrative Machines

The settlement began with what can only be described as cautious optimism. The dwarfs made quick progress building their new mountain home during the first year despite the herds of vicious elephants outside. They found an underground stream that allowed them to irrigate indoor farms and began work on some rudimentary fortifications. But there were warning signs for what was to come. Worryingly, the name of the site they had chosen for their new settlement was Boatmurdered.

Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

about X hours ago from
Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

There's been no shortage of great games to play in 2016, some of which introduced or improved on some even greater ideas. Here are five awesome ideas from 2016 that make me excited for the future of gaming.

#5: No Man's Sky's Procedurally Generated WorldsDon't throw your rotten tomatoes at me just yet! I totally get that No Man's Sky failed to live up to many gamers' expectations, and that Hello Games' ongoing lack of updates or even basic communication with its player base is a huge disappointment. However, No Man's Sky's core premise – exploring a procedurally generated universe full of massive, procedurally generated planets – is still pretty damn awesome, and unlike anything I've ever experienced in a video game.

Stepping out onto a new planet that no one has ever seen before is a huge thrill, and being free to travel for hours in any direction on a planet's surface makes me feel more like an intergalactic explorer than any Mass Effect and Halo game ever has before. I'd love to see more sci-fi titles incorporate procedurally generated worlds into their gameplay – albeit with more variety, activities, and player progression. Oh yeah, and co-op multiplayer. Thanks!

Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

about X hours ago from
Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

There's been no shortage of great games to play in 2016, some of which introduced or improved on some even greater ideas. Here are five awesome ideas from 2016 that make me excited for the future of gaming.

#5: No Man's Sky's Procedurally Generated WorldsDon't throw your rotten tomatoes at me just yet! I totally get that No Man's Sky failed to live up to many gamers' expectations, and that Hello Games' ongoing lack of updates or even basic communication with its player base is a huge disappointment. However, No Man's Sky's core premise – exploring a procedurally generated universe full of massive, procedurally generated planets – is still pretty damn awesome, and unlike anything I've ever experienced in a video game.

Stepping out onto a new planet that no one has ever seen before is a huge thrill, and being free to travel for hours in any direction on a planet's surface makes me feel more like an intergalactic explorer than any Mass Effect and Halo game ever has before. I'd love to see more sci-fi titles incorporate procedurally generated worlds into their gameplay – albeit with more variety, activities, and player progression. Oh yeah, and co-op multiplayer. Thanks!

Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

about X hours ago from
Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

During our month of Mass Effect Andromeda coverage, we've already gotten 101 answers from the team (and even done an AMA ourselves), but we know that Mass Effect fans always have more questions. Well, here's your chance to ask them!

On an upcoming episode of the GI Show, we're going to sit down with BioWare and ask questions submitted by you, the community.  So leave a comment below to ask anything you want to know about Mass Effect Andromeda.  Gameplay, characters, story, multiplayer – let us know what you're curious about, and we'll do our best to get answers.

Ask us your best question in the comments below and subscribe to Game Informer's podcast to get ready for the upcoming episode!