Test Chamber – RIGS Mechanized Combat League For PlayStation VR

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – RIGS Mechanized Combat League For PlayStation VR

RIGS Mechanized COmbat League is one of PlayStation VR's more interesting competitive multiplayer experiences.

It's a game with mechs (or rigs in this case) and guns, but it has more in common with Rocket League than something like Armored Core. In it, you compete three versus three in arenas aiming to score points in a fictional sports league that recognizes the importance and value of giant bipedal robots.

We haven't given the game its proper review yet, but we've already spent a lot of time with it. You can find some of our early impressions here.

Seven Creative Approaches To Difficulty That Make Games Better

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Normal difficulty steals all the glory. It makes sense that most developers would tune their base difficulty for the average player, because that’s the mode that the majority of their audience is going to see. The Hard and I Hate Myself difficulties just don’t get the same amount of attention from players (which is explored further in Ben Reeves' article on difficulty). Few games go beyond the call of turning the enemies into bullet sponges and halving the player’s health bar. But the most creative games rise above that standard and develop harder modes that benefit the package as a whole. Here are a few games that nailed their alternative difficulties and were better for it.

Test Chamber – Exploring Here They Lie's Dark VR Underground

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Exploring Here They Lie's Dark VR Underground

With the PlayStation VR launching this week, buyers are going to be looking for what games they should pick up with their fancy new headset (along with motion sickness medicine). As I wrote in my review, Here They Lie should definitely be on your radar if you're planning to pick one up.

A lot of Here They Lie's appeal comes from its visuals, so Elise Favis and I decided to show off why this game's worlds speak volumes at a glance, whether or not the game has jump scares, and what it's like to get freaked out VR. You can watch Elise play as I guide her toward the blood, the lights, and the monsters of Here They Lie below.

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RPG Grind Time – RPGs Shouldn’t Feel Like Work

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Life can be a grind. You get up, go to work, take care of your household, and find some moments for yourself in between. When we play games, we often play them as a reprieve from the essential responsibilities of our everyday lives. Games are inherently fun, and they should engage us in some way. Otherwise, they’re no better than just another duty in our lives. 

I’ve always been drawn to RPGs because I feel like they offer this intimate experience that you just can’t get with many genres. They combine storytelling and epic battles, while offering a layer of strategy for me to ponder and obsess over, whether it’s in how to build my character or what my next move should be in battle. However, one place I see the RPG genre struggle with is its ability to engage players for the long haul. This is no secret as I just discussed in my last column how I felt social systems were helping dissipate some of this because they give players a way to feel more connected with the experience. While it was important to celebrate that achievement, it also got me thinking about where RPGs often get it wrong – and it’s when they feel like work. Too many times I hear people say they couldn’t stomach grinding anymore, forcing them to give up on the game altogether. 

Don't Forget To Bring A Buddy – A Look At South Park: Fractured But Whole’s Allies

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Don't Forget To Bring A Buddy – A Look At South Park: Fractured But Whole’s Allies

Buddies are an important part of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. They are your combat party, they move the story along as you do your silent protagonist thing, and they help you explore the environment. Buddies were also an important part of The Stick of Truth, but Ubisoft San Francisco is working to expand their roles for the sequel in a number of ways. “We wanted to get more of the buddies voices and their powers in there,“ says senior producer Jason Schroeder.

The simplest way that the buddy's role is being increased is in sheer numbers. This time around, there are 12 buddies, as opposed to Stick’s six. We don’t know the full list of buddies yet, but we do know Scott Malkinson as Captain Diabetes, Kyle as The Human Kite, Stan as Toolshed, Cartman as The Coon, Craig as Super Craig, Tweak as Wonder Tweak, and Jimmy as Fast Pass will all be buddies in the game. We’ve seen other heroes in assorted cutscenes, but these are ones we know will appear in your party, help you fight and navigate the environment, and be defined as buddies.

Our Early Rigs Mechanized Combat League Impressions For PlayStation VR

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Rigs has been a center point of PlayStation VR’s lineup of games and its marketing for a few reasons: It’s a PlayStation VR exclusive, it comes from the creators of Killzone (and the upcoming Horizon Zero Dawn), and it represents an online multiplayer experience that would feel different outside of virtual reality. It has the potential to be the new platform’s premiere multiplayer game, and even though we haven’t had a chance to play the game online (which we feel is necessary to our review), we wanted to share some impressions.

Rigs is a member of the growing sub-genre of sports video games that have an unreal slant. It stands alongside games like Rocket League and Videoball by feeling more like a competitive sport than a shooter, despite the presence of exploding mobile mechs (called rigs, here) with guns. You play as a rookie pilot in the Rigs sports league, which pits an assortment of bipedal rigs with a range of differing abilities against one another through a number of different game types.

Test Chamber – Trespassing Into A Stranger's Home In Hello Neighbor

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Test Chamber – Trespassing Into A Stranger's Home In Hello Neighbor

Hello Neighbor is an upcoming stealth horror game from Dynamic Pixels, where you're tasked with the strange objective of breaking into your neighbor's home. Your ominous neighbor is hiding a dark secret which remains locked up in his basement, and it's up to you to solve the mystery.

Jeff Cork, Suriel Vazquez, and I had a chance to play an early pre-alpha demo for the game. Keep in mind that because this is an early build of an unreleased title, there are several glitches and bugs, but we were amused nonetheless by this unique concept. Watch us use radios to break windows and flee from tomatoes being thrown at us, as we continue to creep into a man's home uninvited.

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Test Chamber – Celebrating Halloween In Overwatch

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Overwatch's latest patch is available today on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, and includes a variety of Halloween fare ranging from voice lines and skins to a brand new brawl, a co-op PVE experience that pits players against Dr. Junkenstein and his army of zomnic terrors.

Players must protect the castle gates and use teamwork in something similar to a horde/defense mode format while taking on special zomnics and bosses.

Join Daniel Tack, Jeff Cork, and Wade Wojcik as they square off against the zomnic tides in this episode of Test Chamber!

How Sonic 3 Became Two Separate Games

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How Sonic 3 Became Two Separate Games

When Sega was in the hardware business, its stable of developers enjoyed luxuries like having an intimate familiarity with the hardware and only developing for one console. In addition, during Sega's tenure as a platform holder, developers could petition for hardware changes to assist development. 

"When Sega stopped making hardware, things really changed in development," says Sonic Team head Takashi Iizuka. "For everyone in Sega making software, we were pretty used to and found a lot of upside in being able to be on our own hardware. If we had requests for our software, we went to our hardware team and said, 'Look, I'm making a game like this, I need this to happen. Make it happen.'"

In the late 1990s, developers approached Sega's hardware team about adding a second screen to the controllers that allowed for minigames on the go. The result was the Visual Memory Unit for the Sega Dreamcast. However, this wasn't the first time developers approached the hardware team for support.