How 10 Years Of Passion And Failed Pitches Led To Ubisoft's For Honor

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How 10 Years Of Passion And Failed Pitches Led To Ubisoft's For Honor

For Honor's creative director Jason VandenBerghe is a passionate guy. In this interview that originally aired on The Game Informer Show podcast, Ben Hanson speaks with VandenBerghe about the drive and vision it takes to bring a kernel of an idea about the emotions of combat through the process of becoming a AAA game developed by Ubisoft Montreal. VandenBerghe discusses why he loves intimate combat in games like Bushido Blade, how you inspire a development team, and why some of the character systems in For Honor might resemble Rainbow 6 Siege.

The game is now in open beta, and you can play it for free, or you can learn more of our thoughts on For Honor and see the game in action in this video of Matt Miller and Javy Gwaltney playing the closed beta. If you enjoy this interview, we recommend that you subscribe and listen to The Game Informer Show on iTunes or Google Play for more like it in the future!

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Side Quest Syndrome: Designing The Road Less Travelled

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Side Quest Syndrome: Designing The Road Less Travelled

 Editor's Note: The following article first appeared in Game Informer Australia Issue #85 and is written by David Milner. You can follow him on Twitter here.

Winning the loyalty of the Normandy’s crew as it prepares for a desperate suicide mission. Performing an exorcism on a wretched soul no longer fit to rule over a wild Skellige province. Discovering a tortured, talking tree in a hidden oasis – a placethat shouldn’t exist but somehow does – amongst the irradiated wastes of Washington D.C.

A good side quest can come to define a video game, giving life to its world, telling tales more intriguing and nuanced than any lying along the critical path.

Exclusive The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Screen Gallery

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Exclusive The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Screen Gallery

Every time Nintendo releases a new Zelda game, it's a big deal, and Link's next adventure is the biggest entry in the series to date. For our March cover story, we had the opportunity to play through more of the game than anyone else outside of Nintendo and speak with Zelda's guardians, Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma. However, since pictures are worth a thousand words, here are a few exclusive Breath of the Wild screens, along with some details you may have missed from our cover reveal.
Click on each image to expand their size.


If you're not careful, Link can get struck by lightning. During a storm, Link will want to unequip his metal weapons and items.


Some of the random enemies that populate the world pose a significant challenge to Link during combat. Thankfully, if Link can take down these imposing foes, he’ll be able to use their most powerful weapons against them

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (February 9, 2017)

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Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (February 9, 2017)

We had a good number of excellent blogs this week, but don't take my word for it. Scroll down to see what community members were writing about!

Community Blogs For February 2 – February 8:

Everything Wrong with Titanfall 2 When I read StarterPack's headline I wasn't sure what the bad parts of Titanfall 2 would be. It has one of the best campaign's I've played in recent memory – and one of the best levels in any game, period. I disagree with our blogger, but he makes his points and I'm willing to mull them over.

Opinion – Resident Evil 7 Is Best Played In VR

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Opinion – Resident Evil 7 Is Best Played In VR

I peer through an open doorway, glancing left and right in fear that Jack Baker, a shovel-wielding maniac, is nearby. Hearing footsteps approaching, I hold my breath. Jack taunts me in the distance, repeating, “Here, piggy piggy…” as he searches for me. He spots me before I can make a run for it. Raising his shovel in a tight grip, I wince while anticipating the pain as he violently swings his weapon at my knees.

But the pain never comes. 

I’m swearing repeatedly under my breath, while my girlfriend laughs beside me. I take off the PSVR headset and return to the real world, feeling as though I was just somewhere else entirely.

The Virtual Life – The Rare, Heartwarming Kindness Of Yakuza 0’s Men

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The Virtual Life – The Rare, Heartwarming Kindness Of Yakuza 0’s Men

Yakuza 0 is among the weirdest, most fascinating games I’ve ever played. I’m still working my way through the open-world, crime-drama-driven brawler but unlike most games of its ilk, I’m not rushing through it. Instead, I’m taking my time because the game – split between two protagonists in two different cities – has countless side quests that are actually worth doing. Not because they necessarily mete out valuable rewards but instead because they have certain twists that make the kind of chores we’ve come to expect from RPGs interesting, and they also seem founded in genuine kindness, a rarity for games that take up the AAA space.

Okay, yes, Yakuza 0 is a crime drama starring two dudes, Kiryu and Majima, who work in the Japanese crime underworld. They’re not exactly model citizens, with Majima even mulling over killing an innocent woman at one point to get back into the Yakuza’s good graces again. However, there’s a general theme of empathy that runs across nearly all the side quests you can do in Osaka and Tokyo that reveals a different side of these men. They’re actually kind, sympathetic guys who live by a code of honor and seek to embrace it at all times, even if it puts them in a position that challenges stereotypical notions of masculinity.

10 Modern Text Adventures You Should Check Out

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10 Modern Text Adventures You Should Check Out

I love text adventures. I’m probably the biggest dork at GI when it comes them, seeing as I used to have a column about them over at Playboy and even wrote a couple myself. It’s been fascinating to watch the genre bounce back after laying dormant for many years, thanks to the rise of digital distribution, basic programs like Twine, and growing mobile games market.

If you’re curious about the genre but have never dived in, this guide will serve as a pretty good starting point, with 10 great recent text adventures that are definitely worth your time.

80 Days80 Days is an interactive, steampunky take on Jules Vernes’ classic novel Around The World In 80 Days. The game is massive and its branching paths give it a lot of replay value, as two adventures will hardly ever be the same. Though the game is available on mobile and PC, I recommend playing the mobile version when you’re on the go for a more thematically immersive experience.

51 Questions And Answers About The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild

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51 Questions And Answers About The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild

Despite The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild being weeks away from a release, we still have a lot of questions about Link's next adventure. The answers that we couldn't fit in our extensive March cover story on the game were saved for this rapid-fire video interview with The Legend of Zelda's creator Shigeru Miyamoto and series producer Eiji Aonuma. Game Informer's Ben Reeves sat down with these legendary Nintendo developers to pick their brain about Breath of the Wild's gameplay, Zelda lore, and much more. If you enjoy this feature, remember we have plenty more videos (including new gameplay) and interviews rolling out throughout the month in our hub of exclusive content on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

Watch the video interview below to learn more than you ever imagined about Miyamoto, Tingle, and New Donk City.

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Science-Fiction Weekly – The TV Shows You Should Watch, Divide, Guardians Of The Galaxy

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Science-Fiction Weekly – The TV Shows You Should Watch, Divide, Guardians Of The Galaxy

Friends often ask me if they should watch Doctor Who. I believe it's one of the most heartfelt, whimsical, and interesting shows on television today, but I can't in good conscience recommend it to most of the people I know. Why? I don't see an easy entry point. I don't think you need to go back the series' inception in 1963 – even I can't get into those episodes – but to understand what makes this show great, you have to start with the 2005 season, starring Christopher Eccleston as the ninth Doctor. He's the least charismatic of the recent Doctors, but the events that unfold around him carry on into future seasons. To put it a better way, you want to watch the Russell T. Davies era of Doctor Who. He's the showrunner, writer, and director who gave this series new legs. Watching over a decade worth of Doctor Who to "get it" is overkill, and something few people will do, but that's the completionish approach.