Question Of The Month: What Would Make The Nintendo NX A Must-Buy Console?

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Question Of The Month: What Would Make The Nintendo NX A Must-Buy Console?

In issue 279, we asked readers what the Nintendo NX needs to win them over and make it a must-buy console. Now it's your turn to weigh in.

The responses we received from magazine readers outlined a laundry list of features any successful console needs, with a slightly greater focus on Nintendo's past weaknesses. First and foremost was the games themselves – including new entries in Nintendo's stable of long-running, beloved series, as well as broader third-party support. A better and more user-friendly online network was also a priority for many readers, along with backwards compatibility for games and Nintendo's popular Amiibo figurines. Another popular request? No more gimmicks for the NX's controller or the system itself – just the power of a modern-day console.

What does the Nintendo NX need to make it a must-buy console for you? Share your thoughts in the comments below, and if you're not done sounding off, check out our previous Question of the Month: What is your next must-buy game?

How Franchise Flavor Seeps Into The Elder Scrolls: Legends

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How Franchise Flavor Seeps Into The Elder Scrolls: Legends

While the Elder Scrolls: Legends is much different than a traditional role-playing game, iconic elements from the franchise manifest themselves in Bethesda’s digital card game (playable now in a no-plans-for-wipe open beta). If you are sneaking a sly Khajiit behind enemy lines as part of a pilfering plan, conjuring up terrible Daedric power, or cobbling together a Dwemer army from spare parts, many deck-building options available draw upon the rich history of the Elder Scrolls universe.

The most obvious examples of the heavy hitters from the Elder Scrolls universe are exemplified with Legendary cards. Here you find things like the massive Odahving, who bakes the opponent’s side of the board when he swoops onto the table, the eccentric Wabbajack that randomly transforms creatures, or even a dragon priest that lets you play your next card for free. Legendary cards are the clearest examples of flavor ripped right from the games, and in many cases can also carry the “unique” designation, meaning a player can only use one of each specific unique in a standard 50-card deck. 

Top Of The Table: The Games Of Gen Con 2016

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Top Of The Table: The Games Of Gen Con 2016

For tabletop enthusiasts, August is a time of celebration. That’s because Gen Con, the largest hobby games convention in North America, promises to bring a bevy of new releases, announcements, and perhaps most importantly, opportunities to get together and play games. The massive convention in Indianapolis has blossomed from its original incarnation in 1968, when it was established by D&D co-creator Gary Gygax as a wargaming get-together.

Today, tabletop gaming companies from around the world gather to show off their best. “Publishers love to launch games at Gen Con, and that is nothing new,” says Gen Con’s vice president of business development Scott Elliott. “It’s fair to say that Gen Con has been the launch pad for gaming for almost half a century. The modern games industry, digital, paper, and otherwise, is filled by people who grew up playing face-to-face games, and many of those games and game companies got their starts at Gen Con. With the increase in crossovers and ports between digital and table top gaming, Gen Con attendees see innovations that others have to wait to experience.”

Life Of An Exotic: The Return Of Destiny’s First Weapon

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Life Of An Exotic: The Return Of Destiny’s First Weapon

With Destiny’s newest expansion, Rise of Iron, Bungie is giving fans a shot of nostalgia in the form of an automatic rifle. The Khvostov was the first weapon players picked up when they started playing Destiny almost two years ago, and that classic rifle will soon return with a significant power boost as one of Destiny’s newest exotic weapons. We sat down with Bungie’s art director Shiek Wang and lead designer Ryan Paradis as they explained the Khvostov’s trajectory back into relevance.

An Exotic Two Years In The MakingBungie didn’t think much of the Khvostov when they originally created it. It was the first weapon players used, so it served a purpose in helping provide players with a positive early experience, but it was quickly followed by a thousand more powerful weapons with a host of more useful perks.

“I think it was very much like, ‘Hey, we need an old weapon that speaks to European design language, pick this reference, use it, make it look broken.’ And then we moved on to designing other things,” says art director Shiek Wang.

Test Chamber – Slinging Spells In Shadowverse

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Test Chamber – Slinging Spells In Shadowverse

Players have a ton of options competing for their digital trading card game time these days, one of which is the mobile offering Shadowverse.

While many of the mechanics are easy to pick up and play right from other popular DCGs like Hearthstone, each class in Shadowverse comes with unique rules that facilitate completely different playstyles.

The evolve ability also adds some depth to timing and finesse to the game. Join Daniel Tack and Wade Wojcik as they see if they can master the mechanics of two different classes in a few quick brawls in this episode of Test Chamber!

Test Chamber – Making Moves In Mobius Final Fantasy

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Test Chamber – Making Moves In Mobius Final Fantasy

The love of all things Tonberry and Ifrit has seemingly no saturation point as yet another Final Fantasy mobile title arrives in North American markets, Mobius Final Fantasy.

While it's been around overseas for some time, now everyone can get in on the fun of changing job classes, collecting classic monsters, and bashing through battle after battle.

Join Daniel Tack and Joe Juba for a quick peek at the latest title to carry on the legacy of the classic RPG franchise in this episode of Test Chamber!

Blog Herding - The Best Blogs Of The Community (August 4, 2016)

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Blog Herding - The Best Blogs Of The Community (August 4, 2016)

We took a week off, but that only means Blog Herding has returned like a Saiyan on the brink of death: stronger, faster, and more powerful than you could ever imagine.

Community Blogs For July 21 - August 3:

The Philosophical Implications of Pokémon Go's Success Instead of pondering why the world is the way it is, Marco Polo gets philosophical on the latest Pokémon craze and what it all means. It's a long read, but stick with it and you'll be rewarded.   

Test Chamber – Kicking ASCII In Roguelike Brutal

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Test Chamber – Kicking ASCII In Roguelike Brutal

Brutal is coming to PlayStation 4 next week and it's a distinct callback to classic ASCII dungeon crawlers with a modern twist, so we decided to take a look.

Brian Shea and I find out if the game lives up to its namesake by making our down into the text, collecting letters, passing the 'J', making potions, and beating up bad guys.

Brutal releases August 9 on PlayStation 4. For our review of the game, head here.

Five Games That Find Drama In Realism

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Five Games That Find Drama In Realism

Life is boring. At least, compared to video games it is. But there’s a certain allure to the mundanity of life, and a romanticism found in meaningful conversations. There’s comfort in the quieter moments where we find ourselves in-between responsibilities. You may find tension in the silent moments after a loss, a darker intention behind a conversation that once seemed innocent, and a weight in making a choice.

As it often does, art imitates life, and a few games have dipped their toes in these themes. Mechanics are stripped away to be replaced by mundanity, quietness, or an evening that starts well and ends horribly. Here are a few of those games and what makes them special.

Freshman YearMoving to a new city isn’t easy. For young Nina, it was a nightmare. A student and new resident to New York, your time with Nina in Freshman Year starts innocently enough: you answer texts from a friend about going out while choosing what Nina is going to wear. You have no reason to expect the night holds anything but good times, except for the ominous warning that rests under the window of the browser game: “Please be aware that this game depicts scenarios that may be distressing to people who have experienced abuse.”

We Take A Look Inside The Quirky Worlds And Exciting Heists Of Blendo Games

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We Take A Look Inside The Quirky Worlds And Exciting Heists Of Blendo Games

Last week, indie developer Blendo Games released Quadrilateral Cowboy, a hacking-based puzzle adventure long in development, and I kind of fell in love with it. Quadrilateral Cowboy isn't Blendo Games' first title, however. The developer has been releasing strange, often narrative-focused games since 2008. We decided to run through several of the most notable games in Blendo's catalog and talk to the man behind the studio, Brendon Chung, about the influences that helped create the unique aesthetic shared across these games.

Gravity Bone (2008)

Though Gravity Bone isn't Blendo's first game, it's the first to use what would become the trademark aesthetic also featured in Thirty Flights of Loving and Quadrilateral Cowboy – people presented as blocky caricatures instead of photorealistic models and a thematic fascination with manuals and espionage. The short game follows the adventures of a spy completing a series of objectives, like delivering a poisoned drink to a target at a party, before the spy eventually killed by a mysterious woman. It's an interactive story that's told in a surreal matter with smash cuts and no intelligible dialogue. When I asked Chung about the motif of manuals that shows up in all three of his narrative games, he talked about taking apart machines and putting them back together when he was a child: