Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

about X hours ago from
Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

There's been no shortage of great games to play in 2016, some of which introduced or improved on some even greater ideas. Here are five awesome ideas from 2016 that make me excited for the future of gaming.

#5: No Man's Sky's Procedurally Generated WorldsDon't throw your rotten tomatoes at me just yet! I totally get that No Man's Sky failed to live up to many gamers' expectations, and that Hello Games' ongoing lack of updates or even basic communication with its player base is a huge disappointment. However, No Man's Sky's core premise – exploring a procedurally generated universe full of massive, procedurally generated planets – is still pretty damn awesome, and unlike anything I've ever experienced in a video game.

Stepping out onto a new planet that no one has ever seen before is a huge thrill, and being free to travel for hours in any direction on a planet's surface makes me feel more like an intergalactic explorer than any Mass Effect and Halo game ever has before. I'd love to see more sci-fi titles incorporate procedurally generated worlds into their gameplay – albeit with more variety, activities, and player progression. Oh yeah, and co-op multiplayer. Thanks!

Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

about X hours ago from
Five Awesome Ideas From 2016

There's been no shortage of great games to play in 2016, some of which introduced or improved on some even greater ideas. Here are five awesome ideas from 2016 that make me excited for the future of gaming.

#5: No Man's Sky's Procedurally Generated WorldsDon't throw your rotten tomatoes at me just yet! I totally get that No Man's Sky failed to live up to many gamers' expectations, and that Hello Games' ongoing lack of updates or even basic communication with its player base is a huge disappointment. However, No Man's Sky's core premise – exploring a procedurally generated universe full of massive, procedurally generated planets – is still pretty damn awesome, and unlike anything I've ever experienced in a video game.

Stepping out onto a new planet that no one has ever seen before is a huge thrill, and being free to travel for hours in any direction on a planet's surface makes me feel more like an intergalactic explorer than any Mass Effect and Halo game ever has before. I'd love to see more sci-fi titles incorporate procedurally generated worlds into their gameplay – albeit with more variety, activities, and player progression. Oh yeah, and co-op multiplayer. Thanks!

Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

about X hours ago from
Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

During our month of Mass Effect Andromeda coverage, we've already gotten 101 answers from the team (and even done an AMA ourselves), but we know that Mass Effect fans always have more questions. Well, here's your chance to ask them!

On an upcoming episode of the GI Show, we're going to sit down with BioWare and ask questions submitted by you, the community.  So leave a comment below to ask anything you want to know about Mass Effect Andromeda.  Gameplay, characters, story, multiplayer – let us know what you're curious about, and we'll do our best to get answers.

Ask us your best question in the comments below and subscribe to Game Informer's podcast to get ready for the upcoming episode!

Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

about X hours ago from
Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

During our month of Mass Effect Andromeda coverage, we've already gotten 101 answers from the team (and even done an AMA ourselves), but we know that Mass Effect fans always have more questions. Well, here's your chance to ask them!

On an upcoming episode of the GI Show, we're going to sit down with BioWare and ask questions submitted by you, the community.  So leave a comment below to ask anything you want to know about Mass Effect Andromeda.  Gameplay, characters, story, multiplayer – let us know what you're curious about, and we'll do our best to get answers.

Ask us your best question in the comments below and subscribe to Game Informer's podcast to get ready for the upcoming episode!

Top 50 Challenge 2016 – Quantum Break

about X hours ago from
Top 50 Challenge 2016 – Quantum Break

Brian Shea has challenged me to play Quantum Break to see if I think it can make our annual list of the top 50 games of the year. In his championing of the game, he mentioned how he liked its novel fusion of gaming and television storytelling, how great protagonist Jack Joye’s time-manipulating powers felt, and the way your choices affected both the game and live action show.

I’m with Brian on how novel the game is. Splitting the story up into game and live-action segments works on a few different levels. For one, it lets the story focus on characters other than Jack without having to justify some sort of gameplay conceit or puzzle. You get to see moments you wouldn’t normally see in a game, such as the scene between Liam Burke and his wife, Emily talking about Liam’s long work hours at the job he’s hiding from her.

Top 50 Challenge 2016 – Quantum Break

about X hours ago from
Top 50 Challenge 2016 – Quantum Break

Brian Shea has challenged me to play Quantum Break to see if I think it can make our annual list of the top 50 games of the year. In his championing of the game, he mentioned how he liked its novel fusion of gaming and television storytelling, how great protagonist Jack Joye’s time-manipulating powers felt, and the way your choices affected both the game and live action show.

I’m with Brian on how novel the game is. Splitting the story up into game and live-action segments works on a few different levels. For one, it lets the story focus on characters other than Jack without having to justify some sort of gameplay conceit or puzzle. You get to see moments you wouldn’t normally see in a game, such as the scene between Liam Burke and his wife, Emily talking about Liam’s long work hours at the job he’s hiding from her.

Top Of The Table – Captain Sonar

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Captain Sonar

One of my favorite trends unfolding in the tabletop scene right now is the reimagining of what components and ideas can formulate a tabletop game. While there are plenty of awesome traditional card and board games releasing in recent months, games like Captain Sonar are stretching the boundaries of expectation. With no dice, cards, or even a traditional board, Captain Sonar manages its gripping gameplay with little more than a few dry-erase markers, some laminated sheets, and a massive screen that separates one team from the other. 

In this new game from designers Roberto Fraga and Yohan Lemonnier (and published stateside by Asmodee), players take on the role of submarine officers, floating silently through the deep on the hunt for the enemy team’s sub. Captain Sonar employs a team-based cooperative approach; up to eight players can play together, splitting off into two teams of up to four. On each team, specific roles must be fulfilled, and the gameplay is different depending on your role. 

Top Of The Table – Captain Sonar

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Captain Sonar

One of my favorite trends unfolding in the tabletop scene right now is the reimagining of what components and ideas can formulate a tabletop game. While there are plenty of awesome traditional card and board games releasing in recent months, games like Captain Sonar are stretching the boundaries of expectation. With no dice, cards, or even a traditional board, Captain Sonar manages its gripping gameplay with little more than a few dry-erase markers, some laminated sheets, and a massive screen that separates one team from the other. 

In this new game from designers Roberto Fraga and Yohan Lemonnier (and published stateside by Asmodee), players take on the role of submarine officers, floating silently through the deep on the hunt for the enemy team’s sub. Captain Sonar employs a team-based cooperative approach; up to eight players can play together, splitting off into two teams of up to four. On each team, specific roles must be fulfilled, and the gameplay is different depending on your role. 

Five Major Changes To Mass Effect’s Multiplayer (And One Big Question)

about X hours ago from
Five Major Changes To Mass Effect’s Multiplayer (And One Big Question)

The Mass Effect series is built on a single-player foundation, but Mass Effect 3 added a compelling cooperative multiplayer mode. That was a risky move for a story-driven RPG, but it paid off for BioWare, drawing in many players who normally stuck to the series’ solo campaign.

Multiplayer returns in Mass Effect Andromeda, and we got to play a few rounds when we visited BioWare’s Montreal studio. If you enjoyed Mass Effect 3’s multiplayer offering as much as we did, then you’ll probably be happy with what the team has in store with Andromeda. However, this new iteration isn’t just recycling the same mechanics. The framework is similar, but BioWare is making some key changes to make the experience deeper and more rewarding for players of all skill levels.

1. Less Hunkering One critical strategy in Mass Effect 3’s multiplayer was figuring out the most defensible points on each map, and then staying in those spots for as many waves as possible. While increasing pressure from advancing enemies certainly made combat feel dangerous, hiding behind a few crates for the majority of a match isn’t the most exciting way to approach multiplayer.

Five Major Changes To Mass Effect’s Multiplayer (And One Big Question)

about X hours ago from
Five Major Changes To Mass Effect’s Multiplayer (And One Big Question)

The Mass Effect series is built on a single-player foundation, but Mass Effect 3 added a compelling cooperative multiplayer mode. That was a risky move for a story-driven RPG, but it paid off for BioWare, drawing in many players who normally stuck to the series’ solo campaign.

Multiplayer returns in Mass Effect Andromeda, and we got to play a few rounds when we visited BioWare’s Montreal studio. If you enjoyed Mass Effect 3’s multiplayer offering as much as we did, then you’ll probably be happy with what the team has in store with Andromeda. However, this new iteration isn’t just recycling the same mechanics. The framework is similar, but BioWare is making some key changes to make the experience deeper and more rewarding for players of all skill levels.

1. Less Hunkering One critical strategy in Mass Effect 3’s multiplayer was figuring out the most defensible points on each map, and then staying in those spots for as many waves as possible. While increasing pressure from advancing enemies certainly made combat feel dangerous, hiding behind a few crates for the majority of a match isn’t the most exciting way to approach multiplayer.