RPG Grind Time – My Conflicted Feelings About The Final Fantasy XV Delay

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RPG Grind Time – My Conflicted Feelings About The Final Fantasy XV Delay

The longer something remains out of reach, do you start to lose interest? I've never been more conflicted about a game than I am about Final Fantasy XV. It's put us on quite the journey, especially since the Final Fantasy XIII Versus days. If you're keeping track, it's been now over a decade that the project has lingered in our minds, every so often popping up and tantalizing us with how great it could be, while also making us skeptical about the actual experience. The past E3 presentation at Microsoft's press conference had some technological hiccups, which didn't instill any confidence, but at least it played better on the E3 show floor. At this point, I feel like I've been on a constant loop of excitement and disappointment with this game, which might be why I've been tackling myriad feelings over the recent delay.

How H.P. Lovecraft’s Horror Crafted A Subgenre Of Video Games

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How H.P. Lovecraft’s Horror Crafted A Subgenre Of Video Games

While Howard Phillips Lovecraft was alive, his work was relatively unknown. It wasn’t until after his death that readers came to admire the rich, self-contained universe of cosmic horror he had created. Inspired by his home town of Providence, Rhode Island, his short stories were typically set near the sea, and introduced readers to eldritch abominations like Cthulhu.

The recurring narrative of Lovecraft’s work was twisted, with each story building on the world he previously established. His writing often felt like a journalistic account of characters investigating the unknown, faced with unspeakable terror. The creations of H.P. Lovecraft’s mind fundamentally changed an entire genre of fiction, and his influence remains a strong presence in the world of horror games.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Saying Goodbye To An Old Friend

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A vibrant star in a galaxy far, far away has gone dark. Kenny Baker, the British actor who brought R2-D2 to life on the silver screen, passed away last Saturday at the age of 81.

For all of the Star Wars fans out there, take a moment to remember Baker. Although we rarely saw his face, he was a hell of an actor, skillfully giving a loving, adventurous spirit to one of Star Wars' most iconic characters. George Lucas, the creator of Star Wars who worked with Baker on six films, offered his condolences on Star Wars' official website: “A talented vaudevillian who could always make everybody laugh, Kenny was truly the heart and soul of R2-D2 and will be missed by all his fans and everyone who knew him.”

Baker was also a part of Time Bandits, one of my favorite movies from my childhood. I was such a big fan of his character, that I named my first band after his character, Fidgit. If you haven't seen the film, I highly recommend you make time for it. It's a wonderful time-traveling adventure from Terry Gilliam that'll make your heart race, rise, and sink. I don't know how many times I've seen it, but it's one of those films I never get sick of, and is unique anything else out there.

The Ups And Downs Of Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV

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The Final Fantasy series was instrumental in making gorgeous cutscenes an integral part of the gaming landscape. With its tradition of amazing cinematic sequences, the series’ move into animated film seemed like a natural transition. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within hit theaters in 2001, and Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children released in 2005 – but the projects faced different problems that kept them from being wholeheartedly embraced by the Final Fantasy community. With Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV, Square Enix takes another shot at bringing its flagship franchise into the movie world.

I watched the English version of Kingsglaive, and while the team clearly learned lessons from the past, the film still has some elements that miss the mark. These are the highlights and the low points of this feature-length exploration of Final Fantasy XV’s universe.

Test Chamber – Titanfall 2's Bounty Hunt Mode In Action

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Titanfall 2 is just a few months away and we recently got the chance to go play a multiplayer mode that's new to the series called Bounty Hunt.

In Bounty Hunt, players score money for killing both players and AI grunts that are sent out in waves. Between waves, players rush to banks situated around the map to deposit cash. Whichever team hits the cash threshold first or has the most money by the end of the match wins.

Join us in this quick look at a match in action as fellow editor and first-person shooter enthusiast Matthew Bertz and I talk about what we think of Titanfall 2 so far. You can watch the video here:

Revealing Supremacy: Exclusive Gameplay Of Destiny's New PvP Mode

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With our month of coverage on Bungie's Destiny: Rise of Iron, we've shown you plenty of gameplay from the campaign and PvE content but now we want to show off the new crucible mode Supremacy. While visiting the studio we were able to capture several rounds of the new mode played by Bungie's senior multiplayer designer Leif Johansen. Supremacy tasks Guardians with scoring points by picking up "crests" that fall after a player is killed. Players can also pick up crests dropped by their fallen teammates, robbing the enemy team of potential points. It's a core concept that should be familiar to players who have ever enjoyed a match of Call of Duty's Kill Confirmed.

Check out the video below to see Supremacy in action on three of Destiny: Rise of Iron's new maps, and don't miss today's other big Destiny news: Bungie just announced the existence of private matches

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Everything You Need To Know About Destiny’s Private Matches

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Everything You Need To Know About Destiny’s Private Matches

We’ve been spending this month rolling out details about Destiny: Rise of Iron, the latest expansion for Bungie’s shared world online shooter. When our magazine cover story published a few weeks back, there was one major piece of content we couldn’t yet confirm, but we promised we’d have the full story later in the month. That time is now, and we can verify that one of the fan community’s most requested features is finally making its way into the game – private matches.

We spoke with the PvP team about the new feature, and we also captured some video in which Crucible design lead, Lars Bakken, walked us through what people can expect out of the new feature. Check out the video with Bakken below, and scroll further down for Game Informer’s own summation of additional info we gleaned through our conversations with the Bungie team. 

And don’t miss today’s other big PvP feature, where we show off video of the new Supremacy game mode in action.

Where is Final Fantasy XV?

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Many gamers are looking ahead to the next generation for exciting games, but for one of Square Enix’s most anticipated upcoming titles, we have to look backward. Final Fantasy Versus XIII was unveiled in 2006, but remained seldom-seen and mysterious until it reappeared as Final Fantasy XV. Even then, concrete answers about the game’s status are rare, so we’ve assembled this timeline of its progress, major appearances, and related comments from original director Tetsuya Nomura, current director Hajime Tabata, producer Yoshinori Kitase, and brand director Shinji Hashimoto.

Update 8/15/16: New entries added to reflect the continued developments, as well as the game's delay to November 29, 2016.

May 2006 At E3, Final Fantasy Versus XIII is announced as part of Fabula Nova Crystalis, as is Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy Agito XIII. Along with Final Fantasy XIII, it is revealed as a PS3 exclusive. 

The Sports Desk – Behind The Wheel Of Motorsport Manager

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In racing games we're all used to bombing down the straights and hanging on for the turns, but that's not the only way to experience the thrills of the track. This week I highlight Sega's Motorsport Manager by developer Playsport Games. Similar to the acclaimed Football Manager series (check this out for a flavor), Motorsport Manager puts you in control of a racing team and tasks you with the action in numerous areas. Recently I played a preview build of the September title and came away impressed. 

You start by choosing which of three racing tiers you want to start in (Europe, Asia, World Motorsport) of various difficulty, and from there you also pick a team. Naturally the expectations are different for each, but you can be hired and fired in mid-season, so there's nothing wrong in bouncing around to find the right fit for your abilities and ambitions.