Replay – Dragon Ball Z: Sagas

about X hours ago from
Replay – Dragon Ball Z: Sagas

When it comes to video games adaptations, Dragon Ball Z has found a pretty comfortable spot in the fighting genre. In 2005, however, it gave the action-adventure genre a shot.

Dragon Ball Z: Sagas follows the familiar Dragon Ball Z storyline, but blows out the fights to feature more combatants and larger levels. When Sagas released, our own Joe Juba gave it a huge thumb down with a score of 5 out of 10. Sagas is not widely loved, but is one of the few Dragon Ball Z console games that is not a straightforward fighter.

Andrew Reiner, Joe Juba, self-proclaimed "D-Head" Jeff Cork, and I take a look at Sagas, show you how to almost get a lot of Xbox 360 Achievements with little effort, and dive into a comparable Dragon Ball Z game on Game Boy Advance. We should probably play more Dragon Ball games in the future (Jeff Cork is such a huge fan, after all) so let us know which ones we need to check out in the comments section below!

Join Our Game Club For Pokémon Sun And Moon

about X hours ago from
Join Our Game Club For Pokémon Sun And Moon

This year on Game Informer's weekly podcast, we debuted a new feature called GI Game Club where we play through specific games and talk about them in exquisite detail alongside our wonderful community. Next up we're talking about Game Freak's Pokémon Sun and Moon. The game is released on the Nintendo 3DS on November 18th, the first chapter of the two-part Game Club will air on The Game Informer Show on December 1st.

If you'd like to join in on the fun, please play the game and stop after you finish the fourth trial on the second island. Then send your poignant thoughts to podcast@gameinformer.com. We're looking forward to reading your emails on the podcast, so send in your thoughts on the game's story, new Pokémon to catch, Alola region, and the gameplay changes from previous installments. Whatever you'd like! The strange/funny/small notes are always welcome!

Feel free to subscribe to The GI Show on iTunes or Google Play, and if you're curious about what we've covered in the past, you can click through to watch our discussions for Final Fantasy VIIUncharted 4: A Thief's End, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and the original BioShock.

Top Of The Table – Junk Art

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Junk Art

After a side trek into the world of horror with Mansions of Madness and a collection of Halloween-appropriate games, this week I’m here to recommend a brilliant new game about creativity, engineering know-how, and a steady hand. Junk Art is colorful and simple to pick up for experienced tabletop gamers who want a break from more in-depth strategy games, but it’s also an ideal family game, or even a fun option for a night in with your partner. 

Junk Art keeps its thematic concept very straightforward. You’re an aspiring artist on a world tour, building up crazy constructions of odd shapes and color, all with the goal of amassing fans and delighting those who visit your installations. Your chosen medium is junk – flower pots, balls, pipes, and platforms – and every piece must fit meticulously with its fellows to create a towering testament to your genius.

The game’s big visual lure is its varied, multi-colored pieces. These vibrant wooden pieces seem ill-suited for construction, but the more you play, the more you find intriguing ways for the different pieces to fit together. The pieces are smartly crafted, smoothly tooled, and excellently balanced, so it comes down to your own choice of placement and light touch to ensure that your tower grows on each turn. 

Top Of The Table – Junk Art

about X hours ago from

After a side trek into the world of horror with Mansions of Madness and a collection of Halloween-appropriate games, this week I’m here to recommend a brilliant new game about creativity, engineering know-how, and a steady hand. Junk Art is colorful and simple to pick up for experienced tabletop gamers who want a break from more in-depth strategy games, but it’s also an ideal family game, or even a fun option for a night in with your partner. 

Junk Art keeps its thematic concept very straightforward. You’re an aspiring artist on a world tour, building up crazy constructions of odd shapes and color, all with the goal of amassing fans and delighting those who visit your installations. Your chosen medium is junk – flower pots, balls, pipes, and platforms – and every piece must fit meticulously with its fellows to create a towering testament to your genius.

The game’s big visual lure is its varied, multi-colored pieces. These vibrant wooden pieces seem ill-suited for construction, but the more you play, the more you find intriguing ways for the different pieces to fit together. The pieces are smartly crafted, smoothly tooled, and excellently balanced, so it comes down to your own choice of placement and light touch to ensure that your tower grows on each turn. 

Revealing BioWare's New Vision For Mass Effect Andromeda

about X hours ago from
Revealing BioWare's New Vision For Mass Effect Andromeda

If you've been following our month of exclusive coverage to coincide with our new cover story on BioWare's Mass Effect Andromeda, you've heard 101 questions and answers about the game, learned more about new companions, and watched our exclusive impressions after seeing hours and hours of gameplay. With this feature, we wanted to take a deeper dive into the new team's vision for the next generation of Mass Effect. We sat down with Mass Effect Andromeda's creative director Mac Walters to talk about the pressure the new team in Montreal feels to live up to the trilogy, how they plan on satisfying the needs of the giant fanbase, and what Walters is personally excited about adding to the sci-fi universe.

Check out the exclusive video interview below to learn more from Walters about what the team has in store for fans of Mass Effect.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Revealing BioWare's New Vision For Mass Effect Andromeda

about X hours ago from
Revealing BioWare's New Vision For Mass Effect Andromeda

If you've been following our month of exclusive coverage to coincide with our new cover story on BioWare's Mass Effect Andromeda, you've heard 101 questions and answers about the game, learned more about new companions, and watched our exclusive impressions after seeing hours and hours of gameplay. With this feature, we wanted to take a deeper dive into the new team's vision for the next generation of Mass Effect. We sat down with Mass Effect Andromeda's creative director Mac Walters to talk about the pressure the new team in Montreal feels to live up to the trilogy, how they plan on satisfying the needs of the giant fanbase, and what Walters is personally excited about adding to the sci-fi universe.

Check out the exclusive video interview below to learn more from Walters about what the team has in store for fans of Mass Effect.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Where Credit Is Due – Video Game Credits That Innovate

about X hours ago from
Where Credit Is Due – Video Game Credits That Innovate

You just conquered the last boss or finished off a trilogy. Besides your initial excitement and maybe an achievement or trophy, what is left? Most likely a plain, black screen scrolling through the names of hundreds of talented people. A standard credit scroll makes sense for movies, but it doesn’t make as much sense in video games. As games mature and embrace what makes them unique, credits need to evolve to reflect the interactivity that makes them special (while still giving proper recognition to creators). Here are lessons that the industry needs to learn about end-game credits from games that got it right.

Make The Credits An Extension Of The Game

Awesome Non-Interactive CreditsMadWorld extends its humor to its credits by allowing its announcers – comedian Greg Proops and voice actor John DiMaggio – to riff on the development team as the main character drives down a highway decorated in billboards of developer names.

Where Credit Is Due – Video Game Credits That Innovate

about X hours ago from
Where Credit Is Due – Video Game Credits That Innovate

You just conquered the last boss or finished off a trilogy. Besides your initial excitement and maybe an achievement or trophy, what is left? Most likely a plain, black screen scrolling through the names of hundreds of talented people. A standard credit scroll makes sense for movies, but it doesn’t make as much sense in video games. As games mature and embrace what makes them unique, credits need to evolve to reflect the interactivity that makes them special (while still giving proper recognition to creators). Here are lessons that the industry needs to learn about end-game credits from games that got it right.

Make The Credits An Extension Of The Game

Awesome Non-Interactive CreditsMadWorld extends its humor to its credits by allowing its announcers – comedian Greg Proops and voice actor John DiMaggio – to riff on the development team as the main character drives down a highway decorated in billboards of developer names.