Test Chamber – Super Mario Run's Hardest Level

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Test Chamber – Super Mario Run's Hardest Level

Super Mario Run only has 24 levels, but if you find each level's 15 bonus coins, you can up the number of levels from 24 to 27.

Of those three additional levels, the final bonus level is easily the most difficult. It's filled to the brim with buzz saws, only has two mushrooms, and no enemies, surprisingly. You can check out a playthrough of the level below.

For our review of Super Run, head here. For a video detailing the highs and lows of the game, head here.

The 10 Worst Best Games Of 2016

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The 10 Worst Best Games Of 2016

The end of 2016 is upon us, and that means it’s time for everyone to lavish praise on the best games of the last 12 months. But what if the gaming industry is 100% garbage and doesn’t produce anything worth playing? Unfortunately, 2016 was another such year, with gamers being fed iterative shooters and blatant cash-grabs devoid of innovation.

Luckily, you have me to tell it like it is. Don’t believe all of the effusive praise about how this was a great year for gaming; all of the most successful and popular games were terrible, and I’m prepared to tell you why.

10. The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – Blood and Wine The Witcher 3 was one of the biggest games of 2015, but everyone agreed on its one major flaw: It was too short. This expansion pack fixes that by adding more of the same stuff you did before, but Frenchier. Conclude Geralt’s epic adventures by making wine, playing cards, and hunting Le Monstérs. The new releases of 2016 must have been truly awful if people sought refuge in a barely disguised regurgitation of last year’s biggest, boringest title.

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 10 Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 10 Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

The Five Reactions You Can Have To Multiplayer Game Patches

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The Five Reactions You Can Have To Multiplayer Game Patches

While many of us are busy over the holidays plugging away at our backlog of single-player games we didn’t make time for in the last few months, others are no doubt returning to multiplayer games they’ve put on the backburner. But, if you’ve been away from popular character-based multiplayer titles for a while, you’ll probably notice a few changes. In competitive shooters like Titanfall, Battlefield, or Call of Duty, you may be saddened at the decrease in power to a gun or tool, but having your character changed means something more personal.

Now, calm down. The changes aren’t as big as they seem. This is still the game you love, and it will continue being that game for years to come, hopefully. That said, it’s understandable to have some emotions when a game you’ve treated as an Old Faithful is suddenly different. It can be scary to comb through patch notes and have a swarm of different, conflicting feelings about the +5% increase in motion animation ascension. 

But don’t worry! I’ve developed a quick guide to how to feel about things. After mining various forums, threads, and social media reactions to when big patches to multiplayer games dropped, I’ve assembled the five only acceptable ways you should feel about what’s happened to your favorite game.

Meet The Man Who Put Mario And Zelda On The Philips CD-i

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Meet The Man Who Put Mario And Zelda On The Philips CD-i

This feature originally appeared in issue 282 of Game Informer magazine.

In 1991, a company known in the United States predominantly for manufacturing light bulbs entered the cutthroat world of video games with the Philips CD-i. The fledgling console was expected to compete directly with the Sega Genesis and Super Nintendo.

The details of how it all came about are vague, but Nintendo partnered with Philips with the intent of making a CD-ROM add-on for the Super Nintendo after an initial partnership with Sony with the same goal went sour. Nintendo signed a contract with Philips that gave the Japanese company rights to all of the CD games that would release for the add-on in exchange for Philips obtaining the rights to use some of Nintendo’s characters, specifically those from the Mario and Zelda franchises. The add-on never came to be, but the contract led to Philips releasing one Mario game and three Zelda games on its CD-i console. It was one of the rare occasions where these characters appeared on a non-Nintendo system.

The Virtual Life – Fathers, Video Games, And The Long Road To Legacy

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The Virtual Life – Fathers, Video Games, And The Long Road To Legacy

What is there to say about my father and I? Lots, I suppose. Son of a war veteran, he spent a lot of his time being shuffled around the country as military brat, never staying in one place for too long. In the '80s, he was in Florida, trying to break the high scores on all the arcade machines. My parents met when my mother disconnected the Ms. Pac-Man cabinet so he would stop playing and give the kids behind him a turn.

I exist because of Ms. Pac-Man. What a thing.

We’re both men with ridiculous names. He’s Javy Rudolph Gwaltney the Third. I’m The Fourth. I often find myself telling strangers and new acquaintances that there won’t be a Fifth. I come from a line of men who have fought in wars, who developed chess software, who provided for the people they loved. My father wanted to settle down in a small town and build a stationary life for his family.

Arkane Knowledge: Five Reasons Dishonored Fans Will Love Prey

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Arkane Knowledge: Five Reasons Dishonored Fans Will Love Prey

Arkane Studios is a big fan of Looking Glass Studios. “I don’t think it’s a secret that with Dishonored we started with Thief in mind, and with Prey we started with System Shock in mind,” says creative director and president of Arkane Studios Raphael Colantonio. “You can call us fanboys of those games if you want.”

Like Looking Glass Studios’ classics, both the Dishonored series and Prey share a philosophy that allows players to find creative solutions to gameplay challenges. And while Prey is far more than “Dishonored in space,” here are five reasons why fans of Arkane’s other big first-person series will want to keep their eye on Prey.

Reason One: Actual ConsequencesThose who played Dishonored quickly realized their actions had consequences. Dishonored players who ruthlessly left dead bodies in their wake only added to the city's disease-ridden streets, which ultimately created more rat swarms and plague victims, which in turn fostered a deadlier environment to navigate later in the game. On the other hand, some missions were easier to complete when you could just chop off your target's head. Fans can expect Prey to adapt similarly to their playstyle.

The Most Badass Lines From Video Game Characters In 2016

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The Most Badass Lines From Video Game Characters In 2016

2016 was a great year for games, wasn’t it? Nearly every genre – shooters, sports, puzzlers, everything – had standout entries. The writing for a lot of these games wasn’t half bad either. At GI, we really enjoy one-liners. Both those that are delectably cheesy and the legitimately badass ones that cut you to the core. From testy rebukes to threats and gentle mocking, here are our favorite lines from 2016’s video game characters.

Mafia IIIMafia III goes to great lengths to show why protagonist Lincoln Clay is filled with all-encompassing fury and hunger for revenge. For all its flaws, the game still ended up having a well-written story headed by characters you could care about. And man, Lincoln can wield words just as well as he can shotguns and knives. Here are some of his best: 

“Family isn’t who you’re born with, it’s who you die for.” 

Why Overwatch Doesn't Need A Story Mode

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Why Overwatch Doesn't Need A Story Mode

“All right, listen up!” says the echoing voice of Soldier 76, Overwatch’s anointed dad character. As part of the intro to the new seasonal mode, “Mei’s Snowball Offensive,” the camera pans over a view of the Ecopoint: Antarctica map, as if this were an action film. ”We brought you here because you represent the best, strongest, most effective warriors we...” The camera swoops down to a shot of Mei, copping a coy smile and hiding a snowball. With a chuckle, she launches it at the screen. “You can’t be serious,” a resigned Solider 76 says. His heart-pounding action flick has been ruined.

The intro’s a little long for something players are supposed to watch every time they want to play a match of Mei’s Snowball Offensive, but it works. It’s cheeky in just the right way, like a comedy skit, and it injects some personality into the mode.