Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

Since it was announced over two years ago at E3 2016, Death Stranding has been an intriguing conversation piece. Every industry event provides another opportunity for Sony and Kojima Productions to showcase the game, and each cryptic trailer sends gamers into a frenzy as they try to find and decipher clues about the content. That approach may energize fans when a game is revealed, but we are too far beyond that with Death Stranding. The mystery isn’t interesting anymore; the lack of information is frustrating, and enough is enough. The next time I see Death Stranding, I want a clear picture of what players actually do in the game, and how.

Before I go any further, let me clarify that my complaint has nothing to do with my perception of Death Stranding’s quality. In fact, I love director Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear series, so I already know I’m going to play this one. Because of that, I still want to be surprised; I’m not looking for huge story spoilers, or a deep dive into every weapon or enemy type. All I want is something – anything – concrete to be excited about. I want to know about gameplay, systems, goals, and progression. Just enough so that I can imagine what a session with Death Stranding might be like – but we haven’t crossed that threshold yet.

Replay – Bushido Blade 2

about X hours ago from
Replay – Bushido Blade 2

Bushido Blade was the second game we ever played on Replay back in 2010, so a look at the sequel is long overdue. Join Reiner, Cork, Tack and me for a series of one-shot samurai duels. Even twenty years later, Bushido Blade remains a unique entry in fighting game history. Unless you count Divekick.

Replay – Bushido Blade 2

about X hours ago from
Replay – Bushido Blade 2

Bushido Blade was the second game we ever played on Replay back in 2010, so a look at the sequel is long overdue. Join Reiner, Cork, Tack and me for a series of one-shot samurai duels. Even twenty years later, Bushido Blade remains a unique entry in fighting game history. Unless you count Divekick.

Classic GI: I Have No Mouth, And I Must Scream

about X hours ago from
Classic GI: I Have No Mouth, And I Must Scream

Science-fiction author Harlan Ellison recently passed away, leaving a legacy of work that includes classic episodes of Star Trek and the Outer Limits as well as a dizzying array of novels and short stories. His short story "I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream" was adapted into a PC adventure game in the early 1990s, which maintained the source material's grim view of humanity. Here's our behind-the-scenes look at the game's development, which first appeared in issue #225 of Game Informer.

While some younger readers might find it hard to believe, our culture’s interest in post-apocalyptic settings didn’t originate with the Fallout series. Harlan Ellison’s 1967 short story “I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream,” is an early landmark, offering readers an unimaginably bleak look at humanity’s future, with five desperate souls enduring the constant torture of a deranged AI. Despite its sparse characterization and lack of a traditional narrative, it was adapted into a computer game of the same name in 1995. Here’s the story of how Ellison and a pair of designers transformed the story into one of the most disturbing point-and-click adventure games of all time.

Diving Deeper Into Kingdom Hearts III And Cyberpunk 2077

about X hours ago from
Diving Deeper Into Kingdom Hearts III And Cyberpunk 2077

Two of my most anticipated games for the near future are Cyberpunk 2077 and Kingdom Hearts III. These games could not be more different than one another – and that’s part of why I love this genre. We have such a variety of experiences always at our disposal with unique worlds to get lost in, and it’s always interesting to see the genre evolve in different ways through Western and Japanese design. To say the last month has been busy is an understatement, but it’s a good kind of busy. I finally played Kingdom Hearts III for the first time (it’s real!) and then CD Projekt Red unveiled of Cyberpunk 2077 in grand fashion with a 50-minute live demonstration

Diving Deeper Into Kingdom Hearts III And Cyberpunk 2077

about X hours ago from
Diving Deeper Into Kingdom Hearts III And Cyberpunk 2077

Two of my most anticipated games for the near future are Cyberpunk 2077 and Kingdom Hearts III. These games could not be more different than one another – and that’s part of why I love this genre. We have such a variety of experiences always at our disposal with unique worlds to get lost in, and it’s always interesting to see the genre evolve in different ways through Western and Japanese design. To say the last month has been busy is an understatement, but it’s a good kind of busy. I finally played Kingdom Hearts III for the first time (it’s real!) and then CD Projekt Red unveiled of Cyberpunk 2077 in grand fashion with a 50-minute live demonstration

The Best Call Of Duty Campaign Moments That Black Ops 4 Won't Have

about X hours ago from
The Best Call Of Duty Campaign Moments That Black Ops 4 Won't Have

Let’s just admit it: Call of Duty campaigns are dumb. They are explosion fueled treks across the world under the guise of a military thriller. Despite their stupidity, I love them. The games are melodramatic, tense, well-paced, and a blast to rip through in an afternoon. You drive, fly, stab, strangle, punch, and generally murder your way through every culture and people you can shake a stick at. You probably even take that stick and shake it so hard somebody dies. The drama is always at its peak, and men are always screaming. At one point, you even pull a knife out of your own chest and throw it in someone’s eye (you couldn’t pay me to make this up). When you kill really good, all your bros slap you on the back or say cool stuff like “tango down” and “confirmed kill” to let you know what a good job you are doing at being a soldier-man. Plus, your codename is always some dumb thing like “Shampoo” or “Toilet Bowl Cleaner.” This is what Call of Duty is best at, letting you go H.A.M. in a place you couldn’t otherwise afford to visit.

We found out recently that Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 does not have a campaign, a first for the series. So, let us look back while the warmth of nostalgia keeps our ice-cold hearts from totally freezing and see the best of what past Call of Duty campaigns have to offer.

The Best Call Of Duty Campaign Moments That Black Ops 4 Won't Have

about X hours ago from
The Best Call Of Duty Campaign Moments That Black Ops 4 Won't Have

Let’s just admit it: Call of Duty campaigns are dumb. They are explosion fueled treks across the world under the guise of a military thriller. Despite their stupidity, I love them. The games are melodramatic, tense, well-paced, and a blast to rip through in an afternoon. You drive, fly, stab, strangle, punch, and generally murder your way through every culture and people you can shake a stick at. You probably even take that stick and shake it so hard somebody dies. The drama is always at its peak, and men are always screaming. At one point, you even pull a knife out of your own chest and throw it in someone’s eye (you couldn’t pay me to make this up). When you kill really good, all your bros slap you on the back or say cool stuff like “tango down” and “confirmed kill” to let you know what a good job you are doing at being a soldier-man. Plus, your codename is always some dumb thing like “Shampoo” or “Toilet Bowl Cleaner.” This is what Call of Duty is best at, letting you go H.A.M. in a place you couldn’t otherwise afford to visit.

We found out recently that Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 does not have a campaign, a first for the series. So, let us look back while the warmth of nostalgia keeps our ice-cold hearts from totally freezing and see the best of what past Call of Duty campaigns have to offer.

BioWare Wants To Make Small, Experimental Games

about X hours ago from
BioWare Wants To Make Small, Experimental Games

Our latest cover story is about Anthem, and that game is currently BioWare's primary focus. However, the studio is also considering projects beyond Anthem's release. While visiting the studio in Edmonton, we spoke with BioWare's general manager Casey Hudson and executive producer Mark Darrah about the team's desire to release smaller, more experimental games that are "true to the corest parts of our core". 

Watch the video below to learn more about how the team is inspired by short filmes and games like Rockstar's Table Tennis.

Click on the banner below to enter our hub filled with exclusive features covering Anthem. 

BioWare Wants To Make Small, Experimental Games

about X hours ago from
BioWare Wants To Make Small, Experimental Games

Our latest cover story is about Anthem, and that game is currently BioWare's primary focus. However, the studio is also considering projects beyond Anthem's release. While visiting the studio in Edmonton, we spoke with BioWare's general manager Casey Hudson and executive producer Mark Darrah about the team's desire to release smaller, more experimental games that are "true to the corest parts of our core". 

Watch the video below to learn more about how the team is inspired by short filmes and games like Rockstar's Table Tennis.

Click on the banner below to enter our hub filled with exclusive features covering Anthem.