For Your Eyes Only: 22 Tips For Surviving In Phantom Doctrine

about X hours ago from
For Your Eyes Only: 22 Tips For Surviving In Phantom Doctrine

Phantom Doctrine released earlier this week, and while it clearly draws inspiration from Firaxis’ snappy and streamlined reboot of XCOM, running your own international spy agency is far more complicated. Phantom Doctrine is loaded with complex game systems and progression paths, most of which are as confusing as a heavily redacted government document. Luckily, you’ve got an inside man on the job. Not only did I write our review of Phantom Doctrine, I also compiled a top-secret list of tips I learned (and wished I would’ve learned sooner) while playing the game.

Here’s a smattering of tips and advice that should help you stay one step ahead of the evil Beholder agency. Just make sure you burn the list after reading it, okay? We don’t want it falling into the wrong hands…

Stay Stealthy! Combat in Phantom Doctrine is particularly punishing – once the enemy is alerted to your presence, they will continuously bring in reinforcements until your agents are killed or escape. As such, you should do everything in your power to remain in Infiltration mode. Disable security cameras, stay out of restricted areas if NPCs can see you, and don’t leave bodies all over the place. Aside from a few story missions, all of Phantom Doctrine’s missions can be completed stealthily, so stick to the shadows whenever you can.

Unboxing The 500 Million Limited Edition PlayStation 4 Pro

about X hours ago from
Unboxing The 500 Million Limited Edition PlayStation 4 Pro

Somewhere in the world, a collector is screaming in agony over a limited-edition PlayStation 4 Pro going from mint condition to used. We had to make that sacrifice to bring you images and details of a console that doesn't like being photographed given just how reflective its surface is and how easily its shell picks up fingerprints. This machine is designed with beauty in mind. You ruin it when you touch it.

This unique version of the PlayStation 4 Pro was created to celebrate Sony selling over 500 million PlayStation consoles worldwide, dating all the way back to the 1994 release of the first PlayStation in Japan. Given just how big that sell-through number is, you'd think this machine would be made out of diamonds or people's souls, but it's actually a tame (but beautiful) translucent blue. The controller, camera, vertical stand, and headset included in this box are also this color. The hard drive offers 2TB of space.

Exactly how limited is this PlayStation 4 Pro variant? Sony is only releasing 50,000 units worldwide. Each unit features a commemorative copper plate with a unique number on it, ranging from 00001-50000. Our unit is number 37109.

Unboxing The 500 Million Limited Edition PlayStation 4 Pro

about X hours ago from
Unboxing The 500 Million Limited Edition PlayStation 4 Pro

Somewhere in the world, a collector is screaming in agony over a limited-edition PlayStation 4 Pro going from mint condition to used. We had to make that sacrifice to bring you images and details of a console that doesn't like being photographed given just how reflective its surface is and how easily its shell picks up fingerprints. This machine is designed with beauty in mind. You ruin it when you touch it.

This unique version of the PlayStation 4 Pro was created to celebrate Sony selling over 500 million PlayStation consoles worldwide, dating all the way back to the 1994 release of the first PlayStation in Japan. Given just how big that sell-through number is, you'd think this machine would be made out of diamonds or people's souls, but it's actually a tame (but beautiful) translucent blue. The controller, camera, vertical stand, and headset included in this box are also this color. The hard drive offers 2TB of space.

Exactly how limited is this PlayStation 4 Pro variant? Sony is only releasing 50,000 units worldwide. Each unit features a commemorative copper plate with a unique number on it, ranging from 00001-50000. Our unit is number 37109.

Reader Discussion – What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

about X hours ago from
Reader Discussion – What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

So I've finally got around to picking up where I left off with Final Fantasy XV to try and do a mad dash finish before a certain cowboy game arrives in a couple of months. While navigating the confusing battle system and the growing pains of these sad royal fellas, I noticed one thing had changed since I played the game on release back in November 2016: the food still looks amazing.

Seriously, my dude Ignis can cook:

After that I started thinking about some of my favorite moments involving food in games, like the absurdity of devouring 20 cheese wheels in Skyrim during a boss fight or figuring out a new recipe in Breath Of The Wild. My conclusion: food in games, like real life, is good! It's really, really good!

What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

about X hours ago from
What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

So I've finally got around to picking up where I left off with Final Fantasy XV to try and do a mad dash finish before a certain cowboy game arrives in a couple of months. While navigating the confusing battle system and the growing pains of these sad royal fellas, I noticed one thing had changed since I played the game on release back in November 2016: the food still looks amazing.

Seriously, my dude Ignis can cook:

After that I started thinking about some of my favorite moments involving food in games, like the absurdity of devouring 20 cheese wheels in Skyrim during a boss fight or figuring out a new recipe in Breath Of The Wild. My conclusion: food in games, like real life, is good! It's really, really good!

What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

about X hours ago from
What's Your Favorite Food To Consume In A Game?

So I've finally got around to picking up where I left off with Final Fantasy XV to try and do a mad dash finish before a certain cowboy game arrives in a couple of months. While navigating the confusing battle system and the growing pains of these sad royal fellas, I noticed one thing had changed since I played the game on release back in November 2016: the food still looks amazing.

Seriously, my dude Ignis can cook:

After that I started thinking about some of my favorite moments involving food in games, like the absurdity of devouring 20 cheese wheels in Skyrim during a boss fight or figuring out a new recipe in Breath Of The Wild. My conclusion: food in games, like real life, is good! It's really, really good!

Replay – Diablo

about X hours ago from
Replay – Diablo

With news of Diablo III heading to Switch, we decided to look back at the game that started it all...on PlayStation. We figure this clunky console port is the best way for people to see just how old the Diablo series is. You'll quickly learn that it's super old. Like "are we looking at a wall or door?" kind of old.

Diablo originally released on PC on December 31, 1996, and many of the hallmark features we turn to this series for today were in that original version. Jeff Cork joins me for a co-op session, and we make a decent amount of progress before disaster sinks in. Turns out, Cork should not be trusted with a bow and arrow.

We also dive into a number of NES games for a variety of quick looks. Enjoy the episode, and come back for a new one in seven days!

Replay – Diablo

about X hours ago from
Replay – Diablo

With news of Diablo III heading to Switch, we decided to look back at the game that started it all...on PlayStation. We figure this clunky console port is the best way for people to see just how old the Diablo series is. You'll quickly learn that it's super old. Like "are we looking at a wall or door?" kind of old.

Diablo originally released on PC on December 31, 1996, and many of the hallmark features we turn to this series for today were in that original version. Jeff Cork joins me for a co-op session, and we make a decent amount of progress before disaster sinks in. Turns out, Cork should not be trusted with a bow and arrow.

We also dive into a number of NES games for a variety of quick looks. Enjoy the episode, and come back for a new one in seven days!

15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

about X hours ago from
15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

All throughout August, we’re updating our site with information about the game on our latest cover, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. In addition to the 14-page print feature that subscribers can read, we’ve had in-depth features on mercenaries, a look at some of the gameplay loops you can participate in, and a blast of rapid-fire questions with the game’s director. Not everything we learn during our studio visit fits neatly into a larger feature, though. Rather than leave those little tidbits in the shadows, we’ve compiled some of the most interesting nuggets and are sharing them with you.

1. You’re going to get to know the historian Herodotus over the course of your journey. “Herodotus goes along with you on the main path for a while, and then he ends up on your ship and stays with you,” says Scott Phillips, game director of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. Hold up. Who’s Herodotus again? “He is well known for recording the events of the wars and going around to different cultures so we have a better idea of who the Greeks were and how they lived and beyond,” says narrative director Melissa MacCoubrey. “He is very good at chronicling those. And then he has an entry about giant ants that mine gold.” Herodotus will even record your adventures, though it remains to be seen where they land on the spectrum between history and giant ants.  

15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

about X hours ago from
15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

All throughout August, we’re updating our site with information about the game on our latest cover, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. In addition to the 14-page print feature that subscribers can read, we’ve had in-depth features on mercenaries, a look at some of the gameplay loops you can participate in, and a blast of rapid-fire questions with the game’s director. Not everything we learn during our studio visit fits neatly into a larger feature, though. Rather than leave those little tidbits in the shadows, we’ve compiled some of the most interesting nuggets and are sharing them with you.

1. You’re going to get to know the historian Herodotus over the course of your journey. “Herodotus goes along with you on the main path for a while, and then he ends up on your ship and stays with you,” says Scott Phillips, game director of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. Hold up. Who’s Herodotus again? “He is well known for recording the events of the wars and going around to different cultures so we have a better idea of who the Greeks were and how they lived and beyond,” says narrative director Melissa MacCoubrey. “He is very good at chronicling those. And then he has an entry about giant ants that mine gold.” Herodotus will even record your adventures, though it remains to be seen where they land on the spectrum between history and giant ants.