How Pro Gamers Deal With Peaking And Life After eSports

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How Pro Gamers Deal With Peaking And Life After eSports

In this month’s issue of Game Informer we dove into the world of eSports, detailing how players, teams, and sponsors work with each other to make sure people who excel at games like Street Fighter, Halo, and more can make a living off their skills. Here at Gameinformer.com, we’re also taking a look at some of the periphery aspects of eSports vital to understanding the world of competitive gaming.

Every professional eSports athlete must deal with one unstoppable enemy: time. As people age, their reaction times deteriorate, making it harder to move with the speed and precision often necessary to win stressful matches. Although many eSports athletes can compete into their 30s, the question remains: is being a professional eSports athlete a viable long-term career?

Peak PerformanceStudies on the peak age for reaction times (one of the most important parts of playing a game like Street Fighter, Dota 2, or Halo) often place the number at around 24, with ages before and after showing some decline. The common assertion, then, is that as players begin to age out of this ideal range of reaction times, they won’t be able to keep up with faster, more reactionary competitors. Take, for example, the ages of last year’s League of Legends World Champions, SK Telecom 1:

Seven Games That Explore Different Types Of Love

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Seven Games That Explore Different Types Of Love

We all know the drill: Valentine’s Day is when you do something special for your loved one or celebrate being single with chocolate, friends… and video games. 

But love isn’t always about young starry-eyed couples giving each other gifts. In fact, Aristotle, Plato, and other philosophers identified multiple kinds of love that we experience throughout our lives. This year, put away your dating sims and spend Valentine’s Day playing games from a variety of genres that explore different kinds of love as defined by the Ancient Greeks.

Storge – parental loveWhat is it? The love parents feel for their children is the theme of many tales. A special connection ensures that a parent will protect their offspring from harm no matter the cost. However, sometimes this affection can grow between strangers, making it even more inspiring. 

The Sports Desk – 48 MLB The Show 17 Details: Gameplay, Graphics, Diamond Dynasty & More

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The Sports Desk – 48 MLB The Show 17 Details: Gameplay, Graphics, Diamond Dynasty & More

MLB The Show 17 comes out on PS4 in a little over a month, and we're just starting to dig into some of the new gameplay offerings and myriad details for the year. We talked with game designer Ramone Russell about a few of the things we can expect from the game, including Diamond Dynasty, smarter A.I. (as well as more less-than-perfect-but-realistic), new ball physics, the importance of animations, and more.

New Ball Physics/Hit Types

Diamond Dynasty

New Gameplay And Impressions For The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild

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New Gameplay And Impressions For The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild

With our extensive March cover story, we're taking a close look at The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. After playing the game for more time than anybody outside of Nintendo, Game Informer's Kyle Hilliard and Ben Reeves sat down in our studio to share their thoughts. The new gameplay shown in this video feature was captured by Nintendo and is from the Switch version. To hear even more of our impressions and new details on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, check out the latest episode of The Game Informer Show podcast.

Watch the video below to see more of the next Zelda in action and learn why it presented such a challenge.

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Sniper Elite 4's Most Graphic Slow Motion And X-Ray Kills

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Sniper Elite 4's Most Graphic Slow Motion And X-Ray Kills

Sniper Elite 4 is all about lining up the perfect shot and taking out your enemy with precision and efficiency. When you do it right, the game often slows down and zooms in on the target, showing just what damage you're doing to them. It's a moment that never ceases to excite, so I wanted to share some of the most brutal takedowns I accomplished while playing through the campaign.

I witnessed a ton of gruesome slow motion and x-ray kills throughout the campaign. Check out my best shots and melee kills in Sniper Elite 4 in the video below. Just be warned that the kills depicted are graphic and one sequence contains minor spoilers for an early mission. For more on Sniper Elite 4, check out our review.

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Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

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Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

When I decided to turn the 12.31 Super Replay into an annual event, I knew the focus needed to be on bad games. People enjoyed watching us suffer; that was the hook that stood out. We used Overblood as the foundation for the type of game we were looking for each year. Blue Stinger, Illbleed, And Martian Gothic were all games that delivered a similar stench. They were perfect selections for the annual Super Replay.

When Tim Turi left Game Informer to work at Capcom, I realized this Super Replay event wouldn't be the same without him. He played through all of these bad games, and, well, I don't think it would have been fair to continue on without him. Out of respect to Tim, we are moving away from the survival-horror angle, and are falling back on my original pitch: it needs to be a bad game period.

As it turns out, there are many different flavors of terrible video games, and I think we found another example in Sonic the Hedgehog that is every bit as enjoyable, campy, and unbearably bad as the original Overblood. The game is simply titled Sonic the Hedgehog, but it's often referred to as Sonic '06. It's developed by Sonic Team for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, and is another failed attempt to give the blue speedster new life.

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 16 Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 16 Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

Evil Geniuses CEO Peter Dager On Playing For, Building, And Managing An eSports Team

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Evil Geniuses CEO Peter Dager On Playing For, Building, And Managing An eSports Team

In this month’s issue of Game Informer we dove into the world of eSports, detailing how players, teams, and sponsors work with each other to make sure people who excel at games like Street Fighter, Halo, and more can make a living off their skills. Here at Gameinformer.com, we’re also taking a look at some of the periphery aspects of eSports vital to understanding the world of competitive gaming.

Peter “ppd” Dager is one eSports’ most recent success stories. What began as a few excursions in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and Heroes of Newerth tournaments eventually became something more when, in 2014, he signed up with Evil Geniuses’ Dota 2 squad. While on the team he helped elevate the North American Dota scene and scored a million-dollar paycheck when he won Dota 2’s The International tournament in 2015. Since then, he’s gone from captain of his team to CEO of his company, trading competitive glory for a quieter (but busier) lifestyle.

We recently caught up with Dager and talked to him about his early career, what it takes to pick the right lineup in a game like Dota 2, and why he made the transition from player to executive.

Replay – Grand Theft Auto IV

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Replay – Grand Theft Auto IV

Grand Theft Auto IV and all of its story-based expansions are now available on Xbox One through backwards compatibility. If you haven't played through this open-world classic yet, this episode of Replay gives you a nice primer of what to expect. We dedicate the entire episode to looking at Grand Theft Auto IV's opening moments, showing how protagonist Niko Bellic's first days in America unfold. This brief look also shows off the dynamic life found in Liberty City. We may also enter a code or two to show just how crazy the action can get.

Our discussion ranges from ranking the top three Grand Theft Auto titles, to discussing where we would like to see the series go next. Feel free to share your insight into both of these topics in the comments section below. Thanks again for watching, and we'll see you again in another episode in seven short days.

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Funny To A Point – Living In The Age Of Spoilerphobia

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Funny To A Point – Living In The Age Of Spoilerphobia

Political strife. Worldwide chaos. Fictional plot twists. If that last one scares you the most, then spoiler: You've got problems. Luckily, you're not alone.

Few things get gamers more worked up than a potential spoiler*, and I don't think you have to be a paranoid nutjob to understand why (you may still be one, but you don't have to be one). Like other entertainment mediums, modern video games go to great lengths to tell intricate and nuanced stories, and most gamers want to experience those narratives firsthand, the way their authors intended. Finding out a key piece of information early can ruin the impact of a big reveal, or leave you guarded against characters and events that you suspect might be affected by it. Instead of being immersed in the story and characters, you become keenly aware of its structure – that unwanted bit of omnipotence transforms you from a player in the thick of the action to a detached observer. It's like knowing who the murderer is in a whodunit, while all the other characters get to gleefully suspect and accuse one another as they unravel the mystery (it's the butler, FYI. It's always the butler). It's like understanding the secret to a magician's trick – the rabbit was up his sleeve the whole time! It's not magic; it's just sleight of hand.