What The Heck Is This? Episode 9

about X hours ago from
What The Heck Is This? Episode 9

We cover a lot of big, well-known games here at Game Informer. Thanks to these efforts, you (hopefully) know all about the next big franchise, or the highly-anticipated new game from that notable indie developer What about those random games that fly under the radar? The one among the dozens that release every day on Steam? Or that Xbox One game with the weird title? This new video series is an attempt to highlight those games – for better or worse.

We see these type of games all of the time. The game that we look at and say, "What the heck is that?" This is our chance to play them and decide, on the spot, if we want to keep playing them, or move on to to something different.

For episode nine we play a multiplayer hide and seek game called Witch It and try not to get our feelings hurt as we pursue a career in art with Passpartout: The Starving Artist.

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (June 8, 2017)

about X hours ago from
Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (June 8, 2017)

Just like with the return of Gohan to prominence in recent episodes of Dragonball Super, Blog Herding makes a return to form and then some. While I know that some of you have no idea what that last sentence means, let's just say we have a super awesome edition of Blog Herding this week, thanks to all of G.I.'s wonderful bloggers.

Community Blogs For May 26 – June 7:

What Makes Success? StarterPack mulls over the reasons why a game is successful. It doesn't merely ponder why a certain game is a hit, but really looks at historical anecdotes about gaming in general and whether or not success can be gauged. Success, after all, means different things to different people.

E3 Bingo: 2017 Edition

about X hours ago from
E3 Bingo: 2017 Edition

The announcements and surprises will be flying during E3, and at the end of the week, gamers are the big winners. But what if you don't like that "greater good" stuff and would rather declare an individual victory? Well, then you can turn E3 into a game with this year's E3 Bingo.

Click here to play the 2017 version!

By following the link above, you'll be taken to a randomized Bingo card full of reveals and moments that we could potentially see on the show floor. Follow along with the press conferences, check the boxes as they occur, and see if you're a winner. You don't actually get anything for winning, except the pride of a job well done (due to random chance).

Friday The 13th: Seven Small Tweaks With Big Benefits

about X hours ago from
Friday The 13th: Seven Small Tweaks With Big Benefits

Friday the 13th has been out for little over a week now, and while we're enjoying the tense cat-and-mouse action, a host of technical and design issues sour the experience. While players would always love more game content and improved net code, those kind of major additions/changes could take weeks or even months to create and implement. Instead, I've compiled a "bang for your buck" list full of small and easy tweaks that would greatly improve the player experience.

#1: Make Jason The HostFar and away, the biggest problem facing console players is Friday the 13th's lack of dedicated servers, coupled with the lack of host migration. As it stands, a player is chosen randomly to act as host, and if that player leaves during the match (say, after being unceremoniously murdered by Jason in the opening minutes), everyone else is abruptly kicked out to the title screen.

Massive — The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Is A Look Back And A Step Forward

about X hours ago from
Massive — The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Is A Look Back And A Step Forward

Massively multiplayer online games are sprawling beasts that grow, improve, and change direction over time. Because of their scope and longevity, approaching them from a traditional review standpoint isn’t often the best fit. Enter Massive, our approach to analyzing and evaluating massively multiplayer online games.

After a lukewarm launch on PC, The Elder Scrolls Online’s first giant chapter update to the game has arrived. There’s a fun new class, a ton of new areas to explore, and small-scale player-vs-player for those looking to sink their swords and spells into other players.  While it's not being called an expansion exactly, all of those elements are in play - you just don't have to already be at the endgame to enjoy the vast majority of the new content.

While the new content and playspace is great, and a perfect place to begin your adventures (putting the other newbie zones that put players off to boring and laborious starts to shame), much of the enjoyment gleaned from my return to Morrowind wasn’t from the big changes or additions found in the new expansion-scale offering, but rather the significant tweaks and alterations that the game itself has experienced over its long run.

Get Ready For Our Portal Game Club Discussion

about X hours ago from
Get Ready For Our Portal Game Club Discussion

With the next rapid-fire entry in our ongoing GI Game Club series, we're taking a look back at 2007's Portal. Not Portal 2, just the original Portal. Several Game Informer editors are going to play through the game and talk about it in exhaustive detail on the next episode of The Game Informer Show podcast airing on June 7th. We're looking for your input. This is a great opportunity to go beyond the "Portal is brilliant" over-simplification and really dig into the how and why of the tiniest details on what makes the first Portal special. Please send in your focused and specific thoughts on what details stand out to you about Portal to podcast@gameinformer.com. Let's all find something new to say about this game.

Portal is cheap on Steam, available on the PS3 and Xbox 360 in the Orange Box, and backwards compatible with the Xbox One.

To get caught up on previous GI Game Clubs, click through the links to hear us discuss the following games in exhaustive detail: Final Fantasy VIIUncharted 4: A Thief's EndDeus Ex: Human RevolutionBioShockPokémon Sun and Moon, and Mass Effect Andromeda.

The Massive E3 2017 Games List

about X hours ago from
The Massive E3 2017 Games List

The future of video games unfolds at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, an annualized event taking place between June 13-15 in Los Angeles, CA. Most developers and publishers introduce new games and experiences at the show. We're expecting to see dozens of announcements, and plenty of surprises this year, along with new looks at games we've already seen. Below is a list of games that we know are in development and have a shot at being on E3's show floor. 

The list is organized alphabetically by publisher, and lists the known platforms for reach release. We will continue adding games as they are announced during the show, and will also provide links to the latest news and impressions for many of the titles on display.

1C CompanyAncestors (Xbox One, PC)
Blackhole: Complete Edition (Xbox One)
Fall of Light (PC)
Haimrik (PC)
Pengame (Xbox One, PC)
Quantum Replica (Xbox One, PC)
Unknown Fate (PS4, Xbox One, PC)
The Watchmaker (PS4, Xbox One)

34BigThings
Redout (Switch)

The Sports Desk – The FIFA 18 Wishlist

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – The FIFA 18 Wishlist

FIFA 17 introduced The Journey story mode, and it was a good first step – adding another alluring mode to a series already chock full of them. On the eve of EA Play, when EA is expected to announce more details about FIFA 18 (see the game's first look below), it's a good time to air my wishlist for the title and the franchise as a whole.

While I certainly don't expect all of these things to transpire, I think it's a good way to check in on the series and provide a standard of sorts against what may be announced.

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Super Replay The Whole Thing

about X hours ago from
Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Super Replay The Whole Thing

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.