Final Fantasy VII Remake Creators Answer Our Questions About Summons, Combat, And Dance Scenes

about X hours ago from
Final Fantasy VII Remake Creators Answer Our Questions About Summons, Combat, And Dance Scenes

From its original announcement at E3 2015 to its release last month, Final Fantasy VII Remake was the focus of intense excitement and anticipation. Though fan expectations for the project were extremely high, the team at Square Enix delivered. Final Fantasy VII Remake delighted players by delivering an RPG that paid homage to its classic roots while adding plenty of modern twists. So how did they do it? How did the team accomplish the seemingly impossible feat of satisfying old fans while bringing in new ones? And what was up with that ending? We got some answers to these questions and more from two key figures on the Final Fantasy VII Remake development team: producer Yoshinori Kitase and co-director Naoki Hamaguchi.

How did you decide which parts of the original game would get new or expanded content in the remake?

A Growing List Of The Best Fan Designs In Animal Crossing: New Horizons

about X hours ago from
A Growing List Of The Best Fan Designs In Animal Crossing: New Horizons

Most Animal Crossing players have come across in-game items that they adore. Whether it's a hat that blocks out the sun or a towering monster statue that guards your home, Nintendo has created a deep well of content for players to enjoy. And that's not all. Players can also make their own custom designs that can be shared with anyone in the world for free. The custom designs show off the player's artistic abilities, and often bring licensed content into the game, such as an Overwatch t-shirt or a painting of a certain goose.

Custom content can be added in two ways. The first is NookLink, which is a part of the Nintendo Switch Online service found on your real-world phone (which requires Switch Online subscription). NookLink allows you to scan QR codes using your phone's camera. Once a code is scanned correctly, bring up your fake phone in Animal Crossing: New Horizons and go to custom designs to find the item of note.

The second way just takes a little playing (and a Switch Online subscription). Once you unlock the Able Sisters' shop, you'll find a terminal that leads to the Custom Designs Portal. Here, you can enter a code (as seen on the images below) to download a specific item or see what a specific designer has made. You can also use this portal to upload and share your own marvelous creations.

A Growing List Of The Best Fan Designs In Animal Crossing: New Horizons

about X hours ago from
A Growing List Of The Best Fan Designs In Animal Crossing: New Horizons

Most Animal Crossing players have come across in-game items that they adore. Whether it's a hat that blocks out the sun or a towering monster statue that guards your home, Nintendo has created a deep well of content for players to enjoy. And that's not all. Players can also make their own custom designs that can be shared with anyone in the world for free. The custom designs show off the player's artistic abilities, and often bring licensed content into the game, such as an Overwatch t-shirt or a painting of a certain goose.

Custom content can be added in two ways. The first is NookLink, which is a part of the Nintendo Switch Online service found on your real-world phone (which requires Switch Online subscription). NookLink allows you to scan QR codes using your phone's camera. Once a code is scanned correctly, bring up your fake phone in Animal Crossing: New Horizons and go to custom designs to find the item of note.

The second way just takes a little playing (and a Switch Online subscription). Once you unlock the Able Sisters' shop, you'll find a terminal that leads to the Custom Designs Portal. Here, you can enter a code (as seen on the images below) to download a specific item or see what a specific designer has made. You can also use this portal to upload and share your own marvelous creations.

An Interview With Sam Lake About Alan Wake's 10-Year Anniversary And What Comes Next For Control

about X hours ago from
An Interview With Sam Lake About Alan Wake's 10-Year Anniversary And What Comes Next For Control

Sam Lake is the writer behind most of Remedy Entertainment's story driven adventures. Not only did he pen the words that brought Max Payne to life, he's also the face of the character. Lake then helped create the stories for Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Control. He's one of video games' great storytellers, giving us a wide variety of experiences to explore.

Of all of the stories he's written, Alan Wake is probably the one that is talked about most. Stephen King and Twin Peaks are often brought up when describing Alan Wake's weird dream-like narrative. It's open for interpretation and debate, and its mystery has turned it into one of gaming's most beloved cult classics. Today, Alan Wake turns 10 years old, and fans want more of it.

I recently talked to Lake about the creation of Alan Wake and what he thinks of it now, 10 years later. He also gives a small tease of what we can expect next from Control.

An Interview With Sam Lake About Alan Wake's 10-Year Anniversary And What Comes Next For Control

about X hours ago from
An Interview With Sam Lake About Alan Wake's 10-Year Anniversary And What Comes Next For Control

Sam Lake is the writer behind most of Remedy Entertainment's story driven adventures. Not only did he pen the words that brought Max Payne to life, he's also the face of the character. Lake then helped create the stories for Alan Wake, Quantum Break, and Control. He's one of video games' great storytellers, giving us a wide variety of experiences to explore.

Of all of the stories he's written, Alan Wake is probably the one that is talked about most. Stephen King and Twin Peaks are often brought up when describing Alan Wake's weird dream-like narrative. It's open for interpretation and debate, and its mystery has turned it into one of gaming's most beloved cult classics. Today, Alan Wake turns 10 years old, and fans want more of it.

I recently talked to Lake about the creation of Alan Wake and what he thinks of it now, 10 years later. He also gives a small tease of what we can expect next from Control.

What It Was Like To Launch Halo 2

about X hours ago from
What It Was Like To Launch Halo 2

In the early 2000s, developer Bungie changed the console-shooter market forever. While first-person shooters certainly existed (and were sometimes extremely popular) on consoles prior to the arrival of Halo, they often failed to deliver the same thrills as their PC counterparts. Following the launch of Halo: Combat Evolved in 2001, Bungie was gearing up to go even bigger with its next title.

Halo 2's story didn't just continue the journey of the super soldier Master Chief as he fought off dueling alien threats of the Covenant and the Flood. It also gave players a unique chance to step into the role of a Covenant Elite to experience that side of the war in a tale of converging fates and unexpected alliances. Add to that the pioneering use of Xbox Live, and Halo 2 became perhaps even more of a phenomenon than its predecessor.

With the seminal console shooter now on Steam in the form of Halo 2: Anniversary, we spoke with Brian Jarrard, who worked at Bungie during the development of Halo 2, and now works as community director at current Halo developer 343 Industries, to learn what it was like to be on the frontlines for the launch of such an important title in gaming history.

What It Was Like To Launch Halo 2

about X hours ago from
What It Was Like To Launch Halo 2

In the early 2000s, developer Bungie changed the console-shooter market forever. While first-person shooters certainly existed (and were sometimes extremely popular) on consoles prior to the arrival of Halo, they often failed to deliver the same thrills as their PC counterparts. Following the launch of Halo: Combat Evolved in 2001, Bungie was gearing up to go even bigger with its next title.

Halo 2's story didn't just continue the journey of the super soldier Master Chief as he fought off dueling alien threats of the Covenant and the Flood. It also gave players a unique chance to step into the role of a Covenant Elite to experience that side of the war in a tale of converging fates and unexpected alliances. Add to that the pioneering use of Xbox Live, and Halo 2 became perhaps even more of a phenomenon than its predecessor.

With the seminal console shooter now on Steam in the form of Halo 2: Anniversary, we spoke with Brian Jarrard, who worked at Bungie during the development of Halo 2, and now works as community director at current Halo developer 343 Industries, to learn what it was like to be on the frontlines for the launch of such an important title in gaming history.

How A Series Of Bad Decisions Led To The Sega Saturn Failure

about X hours ago from
How A Series Of Bad Decisions Led To The Sega Saturn Failure

An exciting blue mascot, a stable of unrivaled licensed sports titles, and an edgy marketing campaign drove Sega from relative obscurity to challenge Nintendo for console supremacy in the early ‘90s. The Genesis went toe-to-toe with SNES to make Sega a household name.

With Sony’s first console looming and the Nintendo 64 just over a year away, the encore nearly five years later proved much more difficult. Following Genesis, fans had lofty expectations for Sega’s Saturn to continue the company’s momentum.

With a swell of hype elevating Sony’s PlayStation, Sega wanted to introduce its console to fans with a bang, but ended up with a whimper due to a surprise North American launch at E3.

We Need More Clarity From Sony And Microsoft's Next-Gen Plans

about X hours ago from
We Need More Clarity From Sony And Microsoft's Next-Gen Plans

I don’t think we can blame the pandemic for Sony and Microsoft’s strange approach to the next-generation of gaming. The missteps began as soon as we learned new hardware was on the way. The confusion surrounding PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X has only become more pronounced as we near their supposed launches.

If both consoles release this holiday season, you’d think we’d know why we should be excited. At the very least, you’d think we’d know what a PlayStation 5 is. Microsoft has at least shown us the Xbox Series X is a real, physical thing, and yesterday we saw some games running on it. Sony, on the other hand, has adopted a college lecture approach to teaching the masses about SSD performance and shoulder-button tension.

When discussing PlayStation 5 and the oddly named Xbox Series X, both Sony and Microsoft have moved away from the huge showcases that provide full pictures of what to expect from the hardware, its performance, and the games you’ll play on it on launch day and beyond, and are now feeding us a steady stream of crumbs. Here’s how load times are faster. Nibble nibble. Here’s what ray tracing looks like. Nibble nibble. Here’s something cryptic about enhanced rumble. Nibble nibble. Here's more 4k! Nibble nibble. Here’s an hour-long lecture about SSD.

We Need More Clarity From Sony And Microsoft's Next-Gen Plans

about X hours ago from
We Need More Clarity From Sony And Microsoft's Next-Gen Plans

I don’t think we can blame the pandemic for Sony and Microsoft’s strange approach to the next-generation of gaming. The missteps began as soon as we learned new hardware was on the way. The confusion surrounding PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X has only become more pronounced as we near their supposed launches.

If both consoles release this holiday season, you’d think we’d know why we should be excited. At the very least, you’d think we’d know what a PlayStation 5 is. Microsoft has at least shown us the Xbox Series X is a real, physical thing, and yesterday we saw some games running on it. Sony, on the other hand, has adopted a college lecture approach to teaching the masses about SSD performance and shoulder-button tension.

When discussing PlayStation 5 and the oddly named Xbox Series X, both Sony and Microsoft have moved away from the huge showcases that provide full pictures of what to expect from the hardware, its performance, and the games you’ll play on it on launch day and beyond, and are now feeding us a steady stream of crumbs. Here’s how load times are faster. Nibble nibble. Here’s what ray tracing looks like. Nibble nibble. Here’s something cryptic about enhanced rumble. Nibble nibble. Here's more 4k! Nibble nibble. Here’s an hour-long lecture about SSD.