Here's How Treyarch Plans To Support Black Ops 4's Battle Royale Mode After Launch

about X hours ago from
Here's How Treyarch Plans To Support Black Ops 4's Battle Royale Mode After Launch

Battle Royale emerged into the wildlands of early access, crude and technically unstable, but with enough promise that a huge audience attached itself to PlayerUnknown Battlegrounds (PUBG). This amorphous space has allowed for PUBG, as well as others like Fortnite and Realm Royale, to present their spaces as living games. In fact, one could argue that it's a necessity for such games to evolve constantly, introducing updates and content drops, making it as much a live service as it is a game. Treyarch knows this and plans to listen to its community carefully with regards to how it will steer Blackout after both the beta and the retail launch in October.

"Constant updates," Treyarch's studio design director David Vonderharr promises. "There will be so many updates you'll get bored [of how many of them there are]."

According to Vonderharr, a lot of the work in Blackout has been centered on the development team having all the necessary tools to change the experience as they see fit once feedback from the community starts rolling in. 

Here's How Treyarch Plans To Support Black Ops 4's Battle Royale Mode After Launch

about X hours ago from
Here's How Treyarch Plans To Support Black Ops 4's Battle Royale Mode After Launch

Battle Royale emerged into the wildlands of early access, crude and technically unstable, but with enough promise that a huge audience attached itself to PlayerUnknown Battlegrounds (PUBG). This amorphous space has allowed for PUBG, as well as others like Fortnite and Realm Royale, to present their spaces as living games. In fact, one could argue that it's a necessity for such games to evolve constantly, introducing updates and content drops, making it as much a live service as it is a game. Treyarch knows this and plans to listen to its community carefully with regards to how it will steer Blackout after both the beta and the retail launch in October.

"Constant updates," Treyarch's studio design director David Vonderharr promises. "There will be so many updates you'll get bored [of how many of them there are]."

According to Vonderharr, a lot of the work in Blackout has been centered on the development team having all the necessary tools to change the experience as they see fit once feedback from the community starts rolling in. 

How Sega Continues To Create Compelling And Ambitious Adventures In The Yakuza Franchise

about X hours ago from
How Sega Continues To Create Compelling And Ambitious Adventures In The Yakuza Franchise

Following a tumultuous early-2000s that saw internal strife and change at Sega, the publisher was looking for new paths. Fresh from its exodus from the console-manufacturing business, Sega had to face market realities. Interest in mascot-driven games like Sonic was fading and the industry was maturing beyond many of its well-known properties. Gamers wanted new experiences, and Sega needed a hit. Instead of playing it safe, Sega took a risk betting on a gritty new concept from longtime producer and director Toshihiro Nagoshi. The gamble paid off, leading to a new flagship franchise and launching Sega into a new era of gaming.

During that time, Nagoshi, who had previously worked on franchises like Daytona U.S.A., Super Monkey Ball, and Shenmue, noted a definite shift in preference toward the North American style of game design. He felt the most popular games during that timeframe followed similar conventions, with few risks. He wanted to break out from that standardized style. Nagoshi also wanted to demonstrate that Japanese developers could create interesting games set in Japan. The result was Yakuza, an action-packed series about the infamous Japanese crime syndicate that has now captivated players for more than a decade.

How Sega Continues To Create Compelling And Ambitious Adventures In The Yakuza Franchise

about X hours ago from
How Sega Continues To Create Compelling And Ambitious Adventures In The Yakuza Franchise

Following a tumultuous early-2000s that saw internal strife and change at Sega, the publisher was looking for new paths. Fresh from its exodus from the console-manufacturing business, Sega had to face market realities. Interest in mascot-driven games like Sonic was fading and the industry was maturing beyond many of its well-known properties. Gamers wanted new experiences, and Sega needed a hit. Instead of playing it safe, Sega took a risk betting on a gritty new concept from longtime producer and director Toshihiro Nagoshi. The gamble paid off, leading to a new flagship franchise and launching Sega into a new era of gaming.

During that time, Nagoshi, who had previously worked on franchises like Daytona U.S.A., Super Monkey Ball, and Shenmue, noted a definite shift in preference toward the North American style of game design. He felt the most popular games during that timeframe followed similar conventions, with few risks. He wanted to break out from that standardized style. Nagoshi also wanted to demonstrate that Japanese developers could create interesting games set in Japan. The result was Yakuza, an action-packed series about the infamous Japanese crime syndicate that has now captivated players for more than a decade.

Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

about X hours ago from
Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

Since 1996, the Pokémon Trading Card Game (TCG) has exceeded all expectations. It rode the fever pitch of the Pokémon craze that swept the world in the late ’90s, selling millions of packs around the world. Parents feared their children would lose themselves (and their own money) to the game, retailers were constantly selling out their stock, and schools banned the cards from their classrooms.

But the card game, much like Pokémon itself, has proved more than a passing fad. As of March, nearly 24 billion cards have been sold worldwide in over 11 languages across 74 countries and regions. This year’s Pokémon World Championships offers over $500,000 in prizes. With 80 sets released in the United States and more releasing at a steady clip, it’s clear the TCG holds a large claim to the Pokémon pie, and shows no signs of slowing down.

To see how these extremely popular cards are made, The Pokémon Company recently offered us a rare look at how Creatures, the studio in charge of maintaining the TCG, designs, draws, tests, and releases new additions to one of the world’s most popular card games.

Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

about X hours ago from
Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

Since 1996, the Pokémon Trading Card Game (TCG) has exceeded all expectations. It rode the fever pitch of the Pokémon craze that swept the world in the late ’90s, selling millions of packs around the world. Parents feared their children would lose themselves (and their own money) to the game, retailers were constantly selling out their stock, and schools banned the cards from their classrooms.

But the card game, much like Pokémon itself, has proved more than a passing fad. As of March, nearly 26 billion cards have been sold worldwide in over 11 languages across 74 countries and regions. This year’s Pokémon World Championships offers over $500,000 in prizes. With 80 sets released in the United States and more releasing at a steady clip, it’s clear the TCG holds a large claim to the Pokémon pie, and shows no signs of slowing down.

To see how these extremely popular cards are made, The Pokémon Company recently offered us a rare look at how Creatures, the studio in charge of maintaining the TCG, designs, draws, tests, and releases new additions to one of the world’s most popular card games.

Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

Insomniac's Spider-Man launched yesterday, which means players have had a whole day to screw around with game's photo mode. We asked our community to send us their best shots of the web-crawler, and they did not disappoint. Check out these amazing photos J. Jonah Jameson would love to get his hands on.

For more Spider-Man, check out our review, upcoming Game Club, tips, and the stories behind all of the unlockable suits

Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

Insomniac's Spider-Man launched yesterday, which means players have had a whole day to screw around with game's photo mode. We asked our community to send us their best shots of the web-crawler, and they did not disappoint. Check out these amazing photos J. Jonah Jameson would love to get his hands on.

For more Spider-Man, check out our review, upcoming Game Club, tips, and the stories behind all of the unlockable suits

Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

about X hours ago from
Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

During our trip to Treyarch, one thing became very clear: the studio is very conscious of its fanbase. From establishing lore over the years in its zombie modes (which we’ll talk about more later in the month) to how the studio is designing its take on battle royale, Treyarch’s motto is that it’s for the fans. You can see this in how Blackout is designed: an almost theme park-like setup dedicated to celebrating the series history that also happens to be a battle royale map. Fans of the series will find versions of older maps, like Firing Range and Nuketown, as locations on the map to investigate for loot and go head-to-head with other players. These locations have obviously been expanded and remixed since their original conception for Blackout, which is something Treyarch is excited to watch players discover for themselves.

Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

about X hours ago from
Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

During our trip to Treyarch, one thing became very clear: the studio is very conscious of its fanbase. From establishing lore over the years in its zombie modes (which we’ll talk about more later in the month) to how the studio is designing its take on battle royale, Treyarch’s motto is that it’s for the fans. You can see this in how Blackout is designed: an almost theme park-like setup dedicated to celebrating the series history that also happens to be a battle royale map. Fans of the series will find versions of older maps, like Firing Range and Nuketown, as locations on the map to investigate for loot and go head-to-head with other players. These locations have obviously been expanded and remixed since their original conception for Blackout, which is something Treyarch is excited to watch players discover for themselves.