What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

about X hours ago from
What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

Red Dead Redemption II has a giant (and wonderful) single-player campaign that can take upwards of 80 hours to complete. Hardcore players have already barreled through to the epilogue, but many others are taking their leisurely pace through Rockstar's meticulous open world, soaking up all the sights and sounds. 

Soon, that world will evolve to include the highly anticipated online component. Details are still scarce about what we can expect from the mode, but based on the activities in the campaign, a lot of possibilities exist for Rockstar to move well beyond adversarial modes and criminal organizations and into slower, period-appropriate activities that could add a dramatically different new audience to the world. While the gunslingers are off playing outlaw and bounty hunter, perhaps players who normally flock to games like Stardew Valley will drive the economy by hunting and harvesting the supplies necessary to fill store shelves. Maybe crews can build and maintain their own homesteads as well. We're excited to see which directions Rockstar explores. 

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

How Blizzard Is Updating Warcraft III’s Fiction For Reforged

about X hours ago from
How Blizzard Is Updating Warcraft III’s Fiction For Reforged

Thanks to the most popular MMO on the planet, WarCraft III’s lore has experienced a great deal of iteration and expansion. With Warcraft III: Reforged, Blizzard returns to the classic RTS that launched Word of Warcraft, but this remake gives the developer the opportunity to smooth over some of its rough story beats and ensure the lore remains up to date. While visiting Blizzard’s campus for our month of coverage, we sat down to talk with senior writer Christie Golden and editor Justin Groot about how they’re taking a red pen to Warcraft III’s original script.

How are you adding to or changing Warcraft III: Reforged’s story in light of what’s happened with World of Warcraft? Is there going to be any revision? Golden: I would say it’s more like augmentation. There’ll be some revision. I wrote Arthas: Rise of the Lich King in 2009 and that was essentially a novelization of his arc through Warcraft III. Within novelizations you’re able to give a lot more backstory and take a scene and expand it. So when I was invited to participate in this remake, I said, “Hey I got this. What do you think about going back through the book and adding a few key lines?” So we went through it, and sometimes we would pick just a few key lines that would add this whole new layer of context.

How Blizzard Is Updating Warcraft III’s Fiction For Reforged

about X hours ago from
How Blizzard Is Updating Warcraft III’s Fiction For Reforged

Thanks to the most popular MMO on the planet, WarCraft III’s lore has experienced a great deal of iteration and expansion. With Warcraft III: Reforged, Blizzard returns to the classic RTS that launched Word of Warcraft, but this remake gives the developer the opportunity to smooth over some of its rough story beats and ensure the lore remains up to date. While visiting Blizzard’s campus for our month of coverage, we sat down to talk with senior writer Christie Golden and editor Justin Groot about how they’re taking a red pen to Warcraft III’s original script.

How are you adding to or changing Warcraft III: Reforged’s story in light of what’s happened with World of Warcraft? Is there going to be any revision? Golden: I would say it’s more like augmentation. There’ll be some revision. I wrote Arthas: Rise of the Lich King in 2009 and that was essentially a novelization of his arc through Warcraft III. Within novelizations you’re able to give a lot more backstory and take a scene and expand it. So when I was invited to participate in this remake, I said, “Hey I got this. What do you think about going back through the book and adding a few key lines?” So we went through it, and sometimes we would pick just a few key lines that would add this whole new layer of context.

Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

about X hours ago from
Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

Chatting with Blizzard co-founder and executive producer Allen Adham at BlizzCon 2018, he told us about several unannounced projects that are being headed up by Tom Chilton and Dustin Browder, respectively, along with a sense of how Blizzard is allocating their wealth of talent.

Adham explains: If you think about Blizzard, Blizzard is fairly unique in our industry. There’s one or two other companies that have been around for almost three decades now. And it took us a long time to go from one team to two teams. And the reason we were able to do that is because we had so many people on that first team that knew how we did things. And then as that team scaled, and as everyone on that team became bonafide long-term Blizzard developers – that lets you carve off a chunk of those people and start the next thing. Then you have two teams, and then another decade passes and those two teams have been around for 10 years with lots of very experienced seniors, you can carve off some of them and then start another two teams. And that’s a gross oversimplification, but you can look at our teams now. We have five public-facing teams: Overwatch, Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, Diablo, and World of Warcraft.

Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

about X hours ago from
Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

Chatting with Blizzard co-founder and executive producer Allen Adham at BlizzCon 2018, he told us about several unannounced projects that are being headed up by Tom Chilton and Dustin Browder, respectively, along with a sense of how Blizzard is allocating their wealth of talent.

Adham explains: If you think about Blizzard, Blizzard is fairly unique in our industry. There’s one or two other companies that have been around for almost three decades now. And it took us a long time to go from one team to two teams. And the reason we were able to do that is because we had so many people on that first team that knew how we did things. And then as that team scaled, and as everyone on that team became bonafide long-term Blizzard developers – that lets you carve off a chunk of those people and start the next thing. Then you have two teams, and then another decade passes and those two teams have been around for 10 years with lots of very experienced seniors, you can carve off some of them and then start another two teams. And that’s a gross oversimplification, but you can look at our teams now. We have five public-facing teams: Overwatch, Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, Diablo, and World of Warcraft.

Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

about X hours ago from
Blizzard Has Multiple New Projects That Have Been In The Works For Some Time

Chatting with Blizzard co-founder and executive producer Allen Adham at BlizzCon 2018, he told us about several unannounced projects that are being headed up by Tom Chilton and Dustin Browder, respectively, along with a sense of how Blizzard is allocating their wealth of talent.

Adham explains: If you think about Blizzard, Blizzard is fairly unique in our industry. There’s one or two other companies that have been around for almost three decades now. And it took us a long time to go from one team to two teams. And the reason we were able to do that is because we had so many people on that first team that knew how we did things. And then as that team scaled, and as everyone on that team became bonafide long-term Blizzard developers – that lets you carve off a chunk of those people and start the next thing. Then you have two teams, and then another decade passes and those two teams have been around for 10 years with lots of very experienced seniors, you can carve off some of them and then start another two teams. And that’s a gross oversimplification, but you can look at our teams now. We have five public-facing teams: Overwatch, Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, Diablo, and World of Warcraft.