Watch Us Take On The Secret Post-game Boss In Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk

about X hours ago from
Watch Us Take On The Secret Post-game Boss In Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk

Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk is a meaty dungeon-crawling soiree, with players forging superior gear and characters over many hours of synthesis and combination.

The final battle, accessible only after completing a lengthy secret dungeon and completing the main game with the six black pages obtained from other huge (and sometimes difficult to find) bosses, can be an extremely difficult encounter. The boss has abilities that can easily one shot even the hardiest characters, with a host of debuffs and other powerful attacks.

Watch us take on the battle above!

Watch Us Take On The Secret Post-game Boss In Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk

about X hours ago from
Watch Us Take On The Secret Post-game Boss In Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk

Labyrinth of Refrain: Coven of Dusk is a meaty dungeon-crawling soiree, with players forging superior gear and characters over many hours of synthesis and combination.

The final battle, accessible only after completing a lengthy secret dungeon and completing the main game with the six black pages obtained from other huge (and sometimes difficult to find) bosses, can be an extremely difficult encounter. The boss has abilities that can easily one shot even the hardiest characters, with a host of debuffs and other powerful attacks.

Watch us take on the battle above!

Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines Remains One Of Gaming's Best Worlds

about X hours ago from
Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines Remains One Of Gaming's Best Worlds

I came to Bloodlines when I was 14. The big draw for the game back then was that it was the first non-Valve title to use the Source engine, the same tech that was powering Half-Life 2. As I, and maybe the couple of thousand other people who played the game soon found out, the engine selling point was a bit overplayed. Bloodlines was ugly for its time and even worse, it launched with a bundle of game-breaking bugs and performance issues. It was a ragged thing, bordering on unplayable. I’d show the game off to friends after school and they’d raise their eyebrows, confused why I was wasting time with something so unspectacular when Halo 2 and Fable were right there.

The answer is that there is a small piece of Bloodlines that is pure magic. I used to think my love for Troika Games’ last title was nostalgia centered on finding something strange and off the beaten path of major releases, but as the years have gone by, I’ve come to realize that Bloodlines does something that few games manage to do: create an alluring world right out of the gate.

Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines Remains One Of Gaming's Best Worlds

about X hours ago from
Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines Remains One Of Gaming's Best Worlds

I came to Bloodlines when I was 14. The big draw for the game back then was that it was the first non-Valve title to use the Source engine, the same tech that was powering Half-Life 2. As I, and maybe the couple of thousand other people who played the game soon found out, the engine selling point was a bit overplayed. Bloodlines was ugly for its time and even worse, it launched with a bundle of game-breaking bugs and performance issues. It was a ragged thing, bordering on unplayable. I’d show the game off to friends after school and they’d raise their eyebrows, confused why I was wasting time with something so unspectacular when Halo 2 and Fable were right there.

The answer is that there is a small piece of Bloodlines that is pure magic. I used to think my love for Troika Games’ last title was nostalgia centered on finding something strange and off the beaten path of major releases, but as the years have gone by, I’ve come to realize that Bloodlines does something that few games manage to do: create an alluring world right out of the gate.

Get A Look Inside Tokyo Station's Shonen Jump Store

about X hours ago from
Get A Look Inside Tokyo Station's Shonen Jump Store

Shonen Jump is responsible for bringing us some of manga and anime's most iconic characters. Dragon Ball's Goku and One Piece's Luffy are just a few names on the roster alongside other popular properties such as Naruto, Yu-Gi-Oh!, and Bleach. Since 1968, the manga shonen anthology has entertained and delighted, leaving a huge imprint on anime culture. Today, many of these shows are still running, video games such as the upcoming Jump Force are still being created, and Shonen Jump continues to retain its legacy of producing some of the most popular manga around. 

Japan has a lot of pride in its manga/anime scene and part of the highlight of visiting is seeing all the dedicated shops, billboards, and overall enthusiasm around it. While exploring Tokyo for this past TGS, I discovered a Jump shop in Tokyo Station after my visit to the delightful Pokémon cafe. I couldn't resist snapping some pictures to show you what it's like inside. 

Check out the gallery above to get a peek at the experience.

Get A Look Inside Tokyo Station's Shonen Jump Store

about X hours ago from
Get A Look Inside Tokyo Station's Shonen Jump Store

Shonen Jump is responsible for bringing us some of manga and anime's most iconic characters. Dragon Ball's Goku and One Piece's Luffy are just a few names on the roster alongside other popular properties such as Naruto, Yu-Gi-Oh!, and Bleach. Since 1968, the manga shonen anthology has entertained and delighted, leaving a huge imprint on anime culture. Today, many of these shows are still running, video games such as the upcoming Jump Force are still being created, and Shonen Jump continues to retain its legacy of producing some of the most popular manga around. 

Japan has a lot of pride in its manga/anime scene and part of the highlight of visiting is seeing all the dedicated shops, billboards, and overall enthusiasm around it. While exploring Tokyo for this past TGS, I discovered a Jump shop in Tokyo Station after my visit to the delightful Pokémon cafe. I couldn't resist snapping some pictures to show you what it's like inside. 

Check out the gallery above to get a peek at the experience.

Shadows Of The Empire – Remembering Star Wars’ Most Audacious Video Game Adaptation

about X hours ago from
Shadows Of The Empire – Remembering Star Wars’ Most Audacious Video Game Adaptation

In 1996, right before the special editions of the original Star Wars trilogy released in theaters, and three years before The Phantom Menace, one Star Wars story tried to make an impact without the aid of an accompanying film. Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire was LucasArts’ attempt to tell the story between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi across multiple types of media, and one of its pillars was a video game. Shadows of the Empire marked a direct collaboration between Star Wars and Nintendo, helped launch the N64, and suffered as a result of its undeniable hubris. Despite all this, the game is one of the earliest examples of a 3D, third-person action game, and it holds a special place in the hearts of young-at-the-time Star Wars fans.

This article originally appeared abridged in the September 2018 issue of Game Informer.

Shadows Of The Empire – Remembering Star Wars’ Most Audacious Video Game Adaptation

about X hours ago from
Shadows Of The Empire – Remembering Star Wars’ Most Audacious Video Game Adaptation

In 1996, right before the special editions of the original Star Wars trilogy released in theaters, and three years before The Phantom Menace, one Star Wars story tried to make an impact without the aid of an accompanying film. Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire was LucasArts’ attempt to tell the story between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi across multiple types of media, and one of its pillars was a video game. Shadows of the Empire marked a direct collaboration between Star Wars and Nintendo, helped launch the N64, and suffered as a result of its undeniable hubris. Despite all this, the game is one of the earliest examples of a 3D, third-person action game, and it holds a special place in the hearts of young-at-the-time Star Wars fans.

This article originally appeared abridged in the September 2018 issue of Game Informer.

The Doomsday Scenario & Silver Lining For FIFA

about X hours ago from
The Doomsday Scenario & Silver Lining For FIFA

I’ve played and reviewed FIFA 19, and in my time with the game I’ve found that its changes are more noticeable on the pitch than off of it. With the game’s modes, from career mode to Ultimate Team, largely the same I’m cautious when I think about the series’ future.

Ultimate Team is clearly FIFA's raison d'être given how much money it brings in, so it’s no surprise that for years the game’s career/franchise mode has not evolved significantly. What’s the future, then, for career mode? While there’s certainly room to grow from where it is now – including making fixes to A.I. logic governing everything from team selection to transfer decisions, among many other possible improvements – imagining a brighter future for the mode is disheartening, when creative director Matthew Prior notes that the mode is low down the totem pole (BTW, I had someone check the German translation, which they say is accurate).

The Doomsday Scenario & Silver Lining For FIFA

about X hours ago from
The Doomsday Scenario & Silver Lining For FIFA

I’ve played and reviewed FIFA 19, and in my time with the game I’ve found that its changes are more noticeable on the pitch than off of it. With the game’s modes, from career mode to Ultimate Team, largely the same I’m cautious when I think about the series’ future.

Ultimate Team is clearly FIFA's raison d'être given how much money it brings in, so it’s no surprise that for years the game’s career/franchise mode has not evolved significantly. What’s the future, then, for career mode? While there’s certainly room to grow from where it is now – including making fixes to A.I. logic governing everything from team selection to transfer decisions, among many other possible improvements – imagining a brighter future for the mode is disheartening, when creative director Matthew Prior notes that the mode is low down the totem pole (BTW, I had someone check the German translation, which they say is accurate).