Astro C40 Controller Review – An Expensive Upgrade

about X hours ago from
Astro C40 Controller Review – An Expensive Upgrade

If you’re in the market for a high-end controller for your PS4 or PC, or are sick and tired of the DualShock’s analog sticks ripping, Astro has a great (albeit pricey at $199.99) solution. The Astro C40 TR premium controller is a significant upgrade over the DualShock, delivering better performance, longer battery life, and a number of useful customizable options.

Sporting the tag line “tournament ready,” much like the Xbox Elite and Scuf options before it, this controller can be dismantled and reassembled quickly, allowing the player to swap the placement of analog sticks and the directional pad. Two buttons on the controller’s back can be mapped within a matter of seconds mid-play, which I’ve found to be handy for almost every game I booted up.

Astro C40 Controller Review – An Expensive Upgrade

about X hours ago from
Astro C40 Controller Review – An Expensive Upgrade

If you’re in the market for a high-end controller for your PS4 or PC, or are sick and tired of the DualShock’s analog sticks ripping, Astro has a great (albeit pricey at $199.99) solution. The Astro C40 TR premium controller is a significant upgrade over the DualShock, delivering better performance, longer battery life, and a number of useful customizable options.

Sporting the tag line “tournament ready,” much like the Xbox Elite and Scuf options before it, this controller can be dismantled and reassembled quickly, allowing the player to swap the placement of analog sticks and the directional pad. Two buttons on the controller’s back can be mapped within a matter of seconds mid-play, which I found handy for almost every game I booted up.

From Tee To Green

about X hours ago from
From Tee To Green

Spring is here, and after a long, tough winter, many people are looking forward to the start of golf season. Video games, of course, have no season, but if you've stopped playing some of the yearly fall titles, you may be looking for a golf game to help get you in the mood.

There are tons of golf games out there, from simple mobile titles to mini golf and well beyond, but today's Sports Desk looks at a culled list of relatively new golf titles offering a range of experiences mainly on PC via Steam. Not included today but also available or coming in the future include Everybody's Golf VR (out on May 21), non-Golf title What the Golf? (now in Early Access), and even sim-manager Resort Boss (out now).

Finally, after the golf be sure to check out more information on some of Madden NFL 20's new features.

From Tee To Green

about X hours ago from
From Tee To Green

Spring is here, and after a long, tough winter, many people are looking forward to the start of golf season. Video games, of course, have no season, but if you've stopped playing some of the yearly fall titles, you may be looking for a golf game to help get you in the mood.

There are tons of golf games out there, from simple mobile titles to mini golf and well beyond, but today's Sports Desk looks at a culled list of relatively new golf titles offering a range of experiences mainly on PC via Steam. Not included today but also available or coming in the future include Everybody's Golf VR (out on May 21), non-Golf title What the Golf? (now in Early Access), and even sim-manager Resort Boss (out now).

Finally, after the golf be sure to check out more information on some of Madden NFL 20's new features.

Super Replay – God Hand Episode 18: The Battle Of Clumsy Old Man

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – God Hand Episode 18: The Battle Of Clumsy Old Man

After a festive holiday season, Game Informer's annual 12.31 Super Replay usually brings suffering. In years past, this day has kicked off complete playthroughs of stinkers like Overblood, Overblood 2, Blue Stinger, Illbleed, Raw Danger, Martian Gothic: Unification, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Vampire Hunter D.

Figuring out which game will be honored with this spot is a stressful decision that usually takes a full year to figure out. That wasn't the case this year. The community figured it out for us. We had the somewhat official I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group vote for a Super Replay earlier this year. With hundreds of votes cast, the poll ended in a tie between Killer 7 and God Hand. Rather than just flipping a coin to see which one we would do, I decided to record both of them. We knocked out Killer 7 earlier this year, and almost rolled right into God Hand, but couldn't find a window to get it done in a productive way. I shelved the Super Replay until 12.31. It was one of the games I was considering years ago for this spot anyway.

Super Replay – God Hand Episode 18: The Battle Of Clumsy Old Man

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – God Hand Episode 18: The Battle Of Clumsy Old Man

After a festive holiday season, Game Informer's annual 12.31 Super Replay usually brings suffering. In years past, this day has kicked off complete playthroughs of stinkers like Overblood, Overblood 2, Blue Stinger, Illbleed, Raw Danger, Martian Gothic: Unification, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Vampire Hunter D.

Figuring out which game will be honored with this spot is a stressful decision that usually takes a full year to figure out. That wasn't the case this year. The community figured it out for us. We had the somewhat official I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group vote for a Super Replay earlier this year. With hundreds of votes cast, the poll ended in a tie between Killer 7 and God Hand. Rather than just flipping a coin to see which one we would do, I decided to record both of them. We knocked out Killer 7 earlier this year, and almost rolled right into God Hand, but couldn't find a window to get it done in a productive way. I shelved the Super Replay until 12.31. It was one of the games I was considering years ago for this spot anyway.

Replay – Van Helsing

about X hours ago from
Replay – Van Helsing

Join the Game Informer crew on a journey through the video game adaptation of the feature film Van Helsing. Hugh Jackman reprises his role of Gabriel Van Helsing, and we get to see how he deals with demons and Mr. Hyde. The game was developed by Saffire Corporation and published by Vivendi Universal Games for PlayStation 2 and Xbox on May 6, 2004.

We play through the opening moments of this title, which appears to be heavily inspired by Devil May Cry, but lacks its depth in movesets and enemies. Since we grow bored of Van Helsing's repetitive action within minutes, we ended playing three games this episode. Game two is Without Warning from Capcom, and game three is Split/Second from Disney.

We hope you enjoy the episode, and we'll see you again in seven short days!

Replay – Van Helsing

about X hours ago from
Replay – Van Helsing

Join the Game Informer crew on a journey through the video game adaptation of the feature film Van Helsing. Hugh Jackman reprises his role of Gabriel Van Helsing, and we get to see how he deals with demons and Mr. Hyde. The game was developed by Saffire Corporation and published by Vivendi Universal Games for PlayStation 2 and Xbox on May 6, 2004.

We play through the opening moments of this title, which appears to be heavily inspired by Devil May Cry, but lacks its depth in movesets and enemies. Since we grow bored of Van Helsing's repetitive action within minutes, we ended playing three games this episode. Game two is Without Warning from Capcom, and game three is Split/Second from Disney.

We hope you enjoy the episode, and we'll see you again in seven short days!

The Inexplicably Riveting World Of Board Games About Plants

about X hours ago from
The Inexplicably Riveting World Of Board Games About Plants

One of the things I love most about the tabletop gaming hobby is the breadth of experiences, settings, and themes that designers attempt to tackle. While conflict or competition is frequently still central to the experience, smart game makers often find ways to tap into surprising corners of the imagination for inspiration.

For gamers more used to marching armies, firing guns, and casting spells, the idea of buying and playing a game about growing trees or flowers may come across as almost absurd. Nonetheless, recent years have seen a treasure trove of excellent games with that theme, representing an impressive variety of strategic complexity and artistic depth. And sometimes, it’s these very games that can manage to attract a partner, friend, or family member who is turned off by the more violent stuff.

But why are there so many of these plant-focused games in the first place? Whether we choose to recognize it or not, growing things is a core conceit of most modern games, whether you’re talking about character progression, drafting and developing new players for an in-game team, or building up an engine of production. As a thematic conceit, the growing and evolving qualities inherent to the natural world of plants taps into the same idea, and in a way that we all have a shared language about. Who hasn’t watched new leaves emerge on trees in the spring time?

The Inexplicably Riveting World Of Board Games About Plants

about X hours ago from
The Inexplicably Riveting World Of Board Games About Plants

One of the things I love most about the tabletop gaming hobby is the breadth of experiences, settings, and themes that designers attempt to tackle. While conflict or competition is frequently still central to the experience, smart game makers often find ways to tap into surprising corners of the imagination for inspiration.

For gamers more used to marching armies, firing guns, and casting spells, the idea of buying and playing a game about growing trees or flowers may come across as almost absurd. Nonetheless, recent years have seen a treasure trove of excellent games with that theme, representing an impressive variety of strategic complexity and artistic depth. And sometimes, it’s these very games that can manage to attract a partner, friend, or family member who is turned off by the more violent stuff.

But why are there so many of these plant-focused games in the first place? Whether we choose to recognize it or not, growing things is a core conceit of most modern games, whether you’re talking about character progression, drafting and developing new players for an in-game team, or building up an engine of production. As a thematic conceit, the growing and evolving qualities inherent to the natural world of plants taps into the same idea, and in a way that we all have a shared language about. Who hasn’t watched new leaves emerge on trees in the spring time?