As Superman 64 Turns 20, We Dig Up Some Relics From The Past

about X hours ago from
As Superman 64 Turns 20, We Dig Up Some Relics From The Past

Superman 64 is considered by many as one of the worst games ever released. With frustrating gameplay mechanics from the very beginning, it's hard to argue against that notion. However, because of the widespread opinion within the gaming community, it has gained a level of notoriety, so we wanted to mark the occasion of its 20th anniversary with some neat finds from Game Informer's history.

As we mentioned before, we've had a team of video game historians embedded in our office for the past several weeks, digging through nearly 30 years worth of files, old games, and behind-the-scenes materials that would typically never be seen by anyone outside of the office. With Superman 64 turning 20 years old, I ventured down to the massive file room to see what Frank Cifaldi and his team from the Video Game History Foundation have uncovered surrounding the now-legendary bust of a title.

After thumbing through the team's file of developer/publisher Titus Interactive, we discovered multiple press releases, several pre-release renders and assets, and even a wireframe version of Lois Lane's character model. It even turns out the development team pitched it as a possible Game Informer cover, as is indicated by a scribble at the top of the page by one of the editors. On that same page, at the bottom, is an advertisement for the PlayStation Superman game that never released.

As Superman 64 Turns 20, We Dig Up Some Relics From The Past

about X hours ago from
As Superman 64 Turns 20, We Dig Up Some Relics From The Past

Superman 64 is considered by many as one of the worst games ever released. With frustrating gameplay mechanics from the very beginning, it's hard to argue against that notion. However, because of the widespread opinion within the gaming community, it has gained a level of notoriety, so we wanted to mark the occasion of its 20th anniversary with some neat finds from Game Informer's history.

As we mentioned before, we've had a team of video game historians embedded in our office for the past several weeks, digging through nearly 30 years worth of files, old games, and behind-the-scenes materials that would typically never be seen by anyone outside of the office. With Superman 64 turning 20 years old, I ventured down to the massive file room to see what Frank Cifaldi and his team from the Video Game History Foundation have uncovered surrounding the now-legendary bust of a title.

After thumbing through the team's file of developer/publisher Titus Interactive, we discovered multiple press releases, several pre-release renders and assets, and even a wireframe version of Lois Lane's character model. It even turns out the development team pitched it as a possible Game Informer cover, as is indicated by a scribble at the top of the page by one of the editors. On that same page, at the bottom, is an advertisement for the PlayStation Superman game that never released.

Surviving The RPG Drought

about X hours ago from
Surviving The RPG Drought

This has been a low-key year for those following the RPG scene. The year started with a bang with the long-awaited Kingdom Hearts III finally reaching our hands, but ever since then, there has been a drought of brand-new RPG releases. This makes sense. We’re on the cusp of entering a new console generation and RPGs are massive undertakings, requiring time and care. We know there are some juggernauts in development, such as Cyberpunk 2077 and Final Fantasy VII Remake; but for now, we need to wait out the dry spell. That doesn’t mean that some gems aren’t on the way, like Persona Q2: New Cinema Labyrinth, Fire Emblem: Three Houses, and action/RPG-slash-first-person-shooter hybrid Borderlands 3, to name a few. We also have expansions with Monster Hunter: Iceborne and Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers to extend our time with these worlds. In the meantime, though, what’s an RPG fan to do? I’ll put it bluntly: savor this moment and use it as an opportunity to catch up on RPGs that got lost in the shuffle.

Surviving The RPG Drought

about X hours ago from
Surviving The RPG Drought

This has been a low-key year for those following the RPG scene. The year started with a bang with the long-awaited Kingdom Hearts III finally reaching our hands, but ever since then, there has been a drought of brand-new RPG releases. This makes sense. We’re on the cusp of entering a new console generation and RPGs are massive undertakings, requiring time and care. We know there are some juggernauts in development, such as Cyberpunk 2077 and Final Fantasy VII Remake, but for now we need to wait out the dry spell. That doesn’t mean that some gems aren’t on the way, like Persona Q2: New Cinema Labyrinth, Fire Emblem: Three Houses, and action/RPG-slash-first-person-shooter hybrid Borderlands 3, to name a few. We also have expansions with Monster Hunter: Iceborne and Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers to extend our time with these worlds. In the meantime, though, what’s an RPG fan to do? I’ll put it bluntly: savor this moment and use it as an opportunity to catch up on RPGs that got lost in the shuffle.

Where's Our Outer Wilds Review?

about X hours ago from
Where's Our Outer Wilds Review?

Today, reviews are taking off for Mobius Digital's long-gestating space exploration adventure Outer Wilds. However, we need some more time before we can land on a verdict for this ambitious interstellar title.

Outer Wilds casts you as an explorer in a solar system ostensibly working to prevent a supernova from exploding and killing everything. You do this by searching planets, comets, stations, and other places of note, looking into ancient texts by alien species to uncover the secret places of the system. Outer Wilds is at its best when you're beholding a beautiful vista of a frozen space pod streaking past the sun or when you're spelunking into a hollow planet to find deserted and mysterious cities. It's a game that brilliantly presents the wonder of space: The art is gorgeous and the proper music always seems to be playing at just the right moment to convey the sorrow or miraculous nature of whatever you're beholding. 

I'm having a fair amount of fun with Outer Wilds' exploratory offerings, though its awkward controls and convoluted progression system are proving to be obstacles the further I get into the game. While I enjoy discovering new secrets buried in the center of moons and planets, my patience for running down the frustratingly oblique main quest is waning. 

Where's Our Outer Wilds Review?

about X hours ago from
Where's Our Outer Wilds Review?

Today, reviews are taking off for Mobius Digital's long-gestating space exploration adventure Outer Wilds. However, we need some more time before we can land on a verdict for this ambitious interstellar title.

Outer Wilds casts you as an explorer in a solar system ostensibly working to prevent a supernova from exploding and killing everything. You do this by searching planets, comets, stations, and other places of note, looking into ancient texts by alien species to uncover the secret places of the system. Outer Wilds is at its best when you're beholding a beautiful vista of a frozen space pod streaking past the sun or when you're spelunking into a hollow planet to find deserted and mysterious cities. It's a game that brilliantly presents the wonder of space: The art is gorgeous and the proper music always seems to be playing at just the right moment to convey the sorrow or miraculous nature of whatever you're beholding. 

I'm having a fair amount of fun with Outer Wilds' exploratory offerings, though its awkward controls and convoluted progression system are proving to be obstacles the further I get into the game. While I enjoy discovering new secrets buried in the center of moons and planets, my patience for running down the frustratingly oblique main quest is waning. 

Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

about X hours ago from
Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

When Blizzard co-founder Mike Morhaime announced his retirement last year, the mantle passed to new president J. Allen Brack. After years over overseeing World of Warcraft, Brack now brings his years of experience to lead Blizzard into a new era. I sat down with him to hear his thoughts and Blizzard's process and we can expect in the future.

Previously, your main focus was World of Warcraft. Now you have a new focus: watching over all of Blizzard's games. How has the job transition gone?

I mean I’m a fan of all the things that Blizzard’s done. I’ve put thousands and thousands of hours into Diablo. Lots of time into StarCraft, both StarCraft when it first came out and StarCraft II. I’ve been a fan of all the games that Blizzard has made even before I worked at Blizzard. It’s not easy to love all my children equally, I guess as it were. In terms of the job, I think it’s been pretty hard honestly. But one of the things we’ve said is that we have more games we’re working on now than in any other point in the company’s history. And that’s very exciting. Being able to see those products, see those games, see those things that the team’s really excited about – that’s what gets me up in the morning.

An Interview With Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

about X hours ago from
An Interview With Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

When Blizzard co-founder Mike Morhaime announced his retirement last year, the mantle passed to new president J. Allen Brack. After years over overseeing World of Warcraft, Brack now brings his years of experience to lead Blizzard into a new era. I sat down with him to hear his thoughts and Blizzard's process and we can expect in the future.

Previously, your main focus was World of Warcraft. Now you have a new focus: watching over all of Blizzard's games. How has the job transition gone?

I mean I’m a fan of all the things that Blizzard’s done. I’ve put thousands and thousands of hours into Diablo. Lots of time into StarCraft, both StarCraft when it first came out and StarCraft II. I’ve been a fan of all the games that Blizzard has made even before I worked at Blizzard. It’s not easy to love all my children equally, I guess as it were. In terms of the job, I think it’s been pretty hard honestly. But one of the things we’ve said is that we have more games we’re working on now than in any other point in the company’s history. And that’s very exciting. Being able to see those products, see those games, see those things that the team’s really excited about – that’s what gets me up in the morning.

An Interview With Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

about X hours ago from
An Interview With Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

When Blizzard co-founder Mike Morhaime announced his retirement last year, the mantle passed to new president J. Allen Brack. After years over overseeing World of Warcraft, Brack now brings his years of experience to lead Blizzard into a new era. I sat down with him to hear his thoughts and Blizzard's process and we can expect in the future.

Previously, your main focus was World of Warcraft. Now you have a new focus: watching over all of Blizzard's games. How has the job transition gone?

I mean I’m a fan of all the things that Blizzard’s done. I’ve put thousands and thousands of hours into Diablo. Lots of time into StarCraft, both StarCraft when it first came out and StarCraft II. I’ve been a fan of all the games that Blizzard has made even before I worked at Blizzard. It’s not easy to love all my children equally, I guess as it were. In terms of the job, I think it’s been pretty hard honestly. But one of the things we’ve said is that we have more games we’re working on now than in any other point in the company’s history. And that’s very exciting. Being able to see those products, see those games, see those things that the team’s really excited about – that’s what gets me up in the morning.

Returning To The World... Of Warcraft

about X hours ago from
Returning To The World... Of Warcraft

The year is 2004. Or maybe 2005. I get a call on my corded dorm room phone. “Dan, we’ve got a problem. It’s the warlocks again. They’re colluding in secret chat to abuse the DKP system so that they get all the items for cheap and then can bid on items that are applicable to other classes and specs…”

This was a typical evening call during those early World of Warcraft years as a “raid officer”. Each four-to-six-hour evening dive into dungeons like Blackwing Lair or Ahn’Qiraj had a lot more going on than just killing monsters and taking loot. Keeping tabs on 40+ other players, their real lives, and their availability in game was a hefty task before even getting to the mechanics and the gear checks. For certain, managing the social aspects of the game was harder than keeping a working aggro rotation on Vaelastrasz.