How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

about X hours ago from
How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

As we revealed earlier this month, you don't need to play the original Rage to understand Rage 2's story. However, there are definitely some surprises and nice nods to the original game for returning players. “One of the great things about the Rage universe is that it’s very open, very flexible," says Tim Willits, Id Software's studio director. "So the opportunities for expansions and content and new games and different characters is rich because we’re not boxed into a world that has any rules. We really purposely set out to create a world that’s open enough and flexible enough to have a continued experience.”
The flexible nature of the franchise means a lot of things. First and foremost, tossing the events of the Rage tie-in novel by Matthew Costello, by the wayside. However, it also means that while Rage 2 tells a standalone story, it's populated by characters returning from the original game. Loosum Hagar taught the first game's protagonist Nicholas Raine how to use the series' trademark wing stick. She returns as the leader of one of the factions in Rage 2. As the gunslinging mayor of Wellspring, she's older, wiser, and a bit more vicious than the last time we saw her. Captain Marshall, the leader of the resistance from the first game, also returns as a bar owner taking up arms against the Authority in a war that never seems to end.

How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

about X hours ago from
How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

As we revealed earlier this month, you don't need to play the original Rage to understand Rage 2's story. However, there are definitely some surprises and nice nods to the original game for returning players. “One of the great things about the Rage universe is that it’s very open, very flexible," says Tim Willits, Id Software's studio director. "So the opportunities for expansions and content and new games and different characters is rich because we’re not boxed into a world that has any rules. We really purposely set out to create a world that’s open enough and flexible enough to have a continued experience.” The flexible nature of the franchise means a lot of things. First and foremost, tossing the events of the Rage tie-in novel by Matthew Costello, by the wayside. However, it also means that while Rage 2 tells a standalone story, it's populated by characters returning from the original game. Loosum Hagar taught the first game's protagonist Nicholas Raine how to use the series' trademark wing stick. She returns as the leader of one of the factions in Rage 2. As the gunslinging mayor of Wellspring, she's older, wiser, and a bit more vicious than the last time we saw her. Captain Marshall, the leader of the resistance from the first game, also returns as a bar owner taking up arms against the Authority in a war that never seems to end.

Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

about X hours ago from
Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

Both Peter Parker and Insomniac Games know the end is near in Silver Lining, the final installment in The City That Never Sleeps DLC campaign. They race to the finish, almost like this story is ticking down like a timer on a bomb. Mary Jane Watson drops big news on Peter, but neither of them find the time to discuss it. All of the big story moments happen on the phone, while Spider-Man races to his next destination.

The flighty pace accompanies the action, which is even more bombastic and challenging than the core game, thanks to new aerial units that can fabricate large stasis fields to limit Spider-Man's web swinging. All of Hammerhead's forces are decked out in Project Olympus gear, and their numbers are great, especially in the optional hideout encounters, which are brutally difficult and a hell of a workout for Spider-Man. Get used to switching between gadgets in these fights. You'll likely need to use most of them.

This final chapter focuses mostly on combat in the story missions, but does slow things down for a brief second to give players a glimpse at Hammerhead's underground lair, another new location that is used effectively for storytelling reasons. One of my favorite moments across the entire game occurs in this location, and is the key moment in Silver Sable and Spider-Man coming to terms with each other's unorthodox styles of crime fighting.

Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

about X hours ago from
Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

Both Peter Parker and Insomniac Games know the end is near in Silver Lining, the final installment in The City That Never Sleeps DLC campaign. They race to the finish, almost like this story is ticking down like a timer on a bomb. Mary Jane Watson drops big news on Peter, but neither of them find the time to discuss it. All of the big story moments happen on the phone, while Spider-Man races to his next destination.

The flighty pace accompanies the action, which is even more bombastic and challenging than the core game, thanks to new aerial units that can fabricate large stasis fields to limit Spider-Man's web swinging. All of Hammerhead's forces are decked out in Project Olympus gear, and their numbers are great, especially in the optional hideout encounters, which are brutally difficult and a hell of a workout for Spider-Man. Get used to switching between gadgets in these fights. You'll likely need to use most of them.

This final chapter focuses mostly on combat in the story missions, but does slow things down for a brief second to give players a glimpse at Hammerhead's underground lair, another new location that is used effectively for storytelling reasons. One of my favorite moments across the entire game occurs in this location, and is the key moment in Silver Sable and Spider-Man coming to terms with each other's unorthodox styles of crime fighting.

Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage, Bethesda Hints At Early 2019 Plans

about X hours ago from
Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage, Bethesda Hints At Early 2019 Plans

Update: In addition to the hotfix detailed below, Bethesda hinted at its early 2019 plans in a separate post.

Highlights include a mid-January patch that will fix things like the Lever-Action Rifle reload animation, certain perk cards, and duplicating robots at the Whitespring. Beginning in 2019, Fallout 76's patch notes will also include additional editorializing from developers to indicate why certain changes and balance updates are made.

Bethesda is also currently working on a new mode that will allow players to work together without PVP restrictions. The developer plans on rolling out this new mode in the first quarter of 2019.

Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage, Bethesda Hints At Early 2019 Plans

about X hours ago from
Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage, Bethesda Hints At Early 2019 Plans

Update: In addition to the hotfix detailed below, Bethesda hinted at its early 2019 plans in a separate post.

Highlights include a mid-January patch that will fix things like the Lever-Action Rifle reload animation, certain perk cards, and duplicating robots at the Whitespring. Beginning in 2019, Fallout 76's patch notes will also include additional editorializing from developers to indicate why certain changes and balance updates are made.

Bethesda is also currently working on a new mode that will allow players to work together without PVP restrictions. The developer plans on rolling out this new mode in the first quarter of 2019.

2018’s Best Games Were About Change

about X hours ago from
2018’s Best Games Were About Change

2018 has been an interesting year for me. I ditched most of my social media platforms, embraced sobriety, became a vegetarian, and in general have tried to focus on finding validation through creation and self-acceptance. As such, the process has made it difficult to see the world as anything other than a series of changing states. However, in spite of that inclination, it's easy to see that some video games have been about change this year. I could spend a fair amount of time talking about what Sony pulling out of E3 means for one of gaming’s oldest reveal-laden extravaganzas, or grapple with how the boxed product of my youth is becoming less of a sure thing as games as services continue the rise.

Instead of industry trends, however, I’ve always endeavored to make The Virtual Life about the games themselves and what they say about what it is to be human. So, for this year’s last column, I’m gonna talk about God of War and Red Dead Redemption II one more time — specifically how they tackle the concept of change to great effect.  Be warned, heavy endgame spoilers for both titles ahead.

2018’s Best Games Were About Change

about X hours ago from
2018’s Best Games Were About Change

2018 has been an interesting year for me. I ditched most of my social media platforms, embraced sobriety, became a vegetarian, and in general have tried to focus on finding validation through creation and self-acceptance. As such, the process has made it difficult to see the world as anything other than a series of changing states. However, in spite of that inclination, it's easy to see that some video games have been about change this year. I could spend a fair amount of time talking about what Sony pulling out of E3 means for one of gaming’s oldest reveal-laden extravaganzas, or grapple with how the boxed product of my youth is becoming less of a sure thing as games as services continue the rise.

Instead of industry trends, however, I’ve always endeavored to make The Virtual Life about the games themselves and what they say about what it is to be human. So, for this year’s last column, I’m gonna talk about God of War and Red Dead Redemption II one more time — specifically how they tackle the concept of change to great effect.  Be warned, heavy endgame spoilers for both titles ahead.

Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage

about X hours ago from
Fallout 76 Hotfix Addresses Enemies Not Taking Damage

Bethesda has released notes detailing a new hotfix for Fallout 76. While the notes address a handful of smaller bugs like PC client stability and a fix for a bug that allowed users to duplicate items, the final note is slightly more consequential.

According to the hotfix notes, this update, "Addressed an issue that could prevent high-damage and explosive weapons from dealing damage to enemies, or cause enemies to heal immediately after taking damage." In our editor playthroughs of the game, we intermittently ran into this issue. While we don't know the extent of incidence in the wider community, it's great to hear this bug is being resolved. 

Bethesda says that while PC players will have to complete a small download to receive these changes, console players should notice these fixes with no download required.