The Sports Desk – Hands-On With Mutant Football League

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The Sports Desk – Hands-On With Mutant Football League

The original Mutant League Football came out for the Genesis in 1993 by Electronic Arts. It catered to an audience who wanted an alternative to the traditional sim-based takes on the sport – one with the ability to kill players and fields littered with hazards such as landmines. Now series creator, Michael Mendheim, has successfully Kickstarted a spiritual successor to the original title (called Mutant Football League) with Digital Dreams Entertainment for release on PC in October, with PS4 and Xbox One versions to follow in spring 2018. We recently got hands-on time with a pre-alpha build of the title, and the game's promise already shines through.

Mutant Football League plays like an old-school Blitz title, but throws in enough extra elements to think about from play-to-play and even moment-to-moment. From a giant chainsaw roving across the fifty-yard line to electrically charged defensive players who cause fumbles on contact, Mutant Football League is a different kind of pigskin, but more importantly, it's one that layers its additions on top of a traditional gameplay foundation. Calling audibles, making reads as a QB, and calling the right plays sit comfortably alongside giant orcs that can kill your players and avoiding mines on the field and blood moats along the sideline.

Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Exclusive Concept Art Gallery

about X hours ago from
Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Exclusive Concept Art Gallery

We’re continuing our exclusive online coverage of our recent cover story, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, with a concept art gallery. Exhibiting Naughty Dog’s vision for its standalone DLC due out this year, this gallery shines the spotlight on the environments Chloe Frazer and Nadine Ross will visit. The two team up together to get their hands on the highly valuable Tusk of Ganesh, hoping to change their status in the treasure-hunting business. The trip will take them across the mountains of India, where they visit temples, scale statues, and drive through its terrain. Expect plenty of chaotic and dangerous moments, but also quieter, more reflective times.  

Note: Click on photos for full size.

Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

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Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

When I decided to turn the 12.31 Super Replay into an annual event, I knew the focus needed to be on bad games. People enjoyed watching us suffer; that was the hook that stood out. We used Overblood as the foundation for the type of game we were looking for each year. Blue Stinger, Illbleed, And Martian Gothic were all games that delivered a similar stench. They were perfect selections for the annual Super Replay.

When Tim Turi left Game Informer to work at Capcom, I realized this Super Replay event wouldn't be the same without him. He played through all of these bad games, and, well, I don't think it would have been fair to continue on without him. Out of respect to Tim, we are moving away from the survival-horror angle, and are falling back on my original pitch: it needs to be a bad game period.

As it turns out, there are many different flavors of terrible video games, and I think we found another example in Sonic the Hedgehog that is every bit as enjoyable, campy, and unbearably bad as the original Overblood. The game is simply titled Sonic the Hedgehog, but it's often referred to as Sonic '06. It's developed by Sonic Team for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, and is another failed attempt to give the blue speedster new life.

Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

At PAX East 2017, I played around 30 minutes of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus (The full DLC should take around 2-3 hours to complete). While story spoilers are off the table, I'm eager to share just how Gladiolus plays.

I had a lot more fun with Gladiolus than I ever did with Noctis. Gladiolus features an in-your-face smashy-smashy playstyle that's all about huge offense and precise defense. Through attacking, Gladiolus charges up powerful moves, often area-of-effect attacks, that dish out tremendous damage. But that's not all, Gladiolus is much more than an attack spammer. A block/guard ability allows Gladiolus to prevent incoming damage and negate attacks, and if you time it right, builds up a rage meter that can add a ridiculous multiplier to your outgoing damage. 

Your blocks must be precise in order to really get the meter going though, so you must pay careful attention to enemy movements and attack signals. If you can time the block just before an incoming attack lands, you'll build your rage in addition to leaving the enemy vulnerable to devastating attacks.

Replay – Jak 3

about X hours ago from
Replay – Jak 3

This month, we have all kinds of coverage planned for the upcoming Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, which is as good excuse as any to look back at other Naughty Dog games on Replay.

Andrew Reiner, Jeff Marchiafava, Suriel Vazquez, and I take a look at the third game in the Jak & Daxter trilogy (which technically comprises six games) and see how it holds up. The Mad Max-inspired world is still a lot of fun to explore, it turns out. For details on what almost happened to the Jak & Daxter series before Naughty Dog went all in on The Last of Us, head here.

For the second segment, we take a look at a game that is tangentially connected to Naughty Dog, and complain a lot about its load times.

Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

At PAX East 2017, I played around 30 minutes of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus (The full DLC should take around 2-3 hours to complete). While story spoilers are off the table, I'm eager to share just how Gladiolus plays.

I had a lot more fun with Gladiolus than I ever did with Noctics. Gladiolus features an in-your-face smashy-smashy playstyle that's all about huge offense and precise defense. Through attacking, Gladiolus charges up powerful moves, often area-of-effect attacks, that dish out tremendous damage. But that's not all, Gladiolus is much more than an attack spammer. A block/guard ability allows Gladiolus to prevent incoming damage and negate attacks, and if you time it right, builds up a rage meter that can add a ridiculous multiplier to your outgoing damage. 

Your blocks must be precise in order to really get the meter going though, so you must pay careful attention to enemy movements and attack signals. If you can time the block just before an incoming attack lands, you'll build your rage in addition to leaving the enemy vulnerable to devastating attacks.

The Horizon Zero Dawn Real-World Road Trip Challenge

about X hours ago from
The Horizon Zero Dawn Real-World Road Trip Challenge

If you’ve been enjoying Horizon: Zero Dawn in recent weeks, you don’t need to be told about the gorgeous environments the game boasts. The mountains, forests, and deserts of the game make for remarkable scenery, and astute observers will quickly recognize this is far more than a fantasy landscape. The world of Horizon is strongly based on the geography of real-world Colorado and Utah, and many of the vantage points you see in the game have real-world analogues you can visit. And you won’t even have to deal with killer robots along the way. 

Here’s our guide to a straight-up awesome road trip vacation that you could take in the real world, taking you past many of Aloy’s sites of adventure, and simultaneously letting you visit some of America’s most beautiful and engaging vacation spots. 

Note that the following includes minor spoilers for the locations visited and adventures undertaken during Horizon: Zero Dawn, but in every instance we’ve made a point to avoid discussing major plot points.

Funny To A Point – The Video Game Genres Of Real Life

about X hours ago from
Funny To A Point – The Video Game Genres Of Real Life

If you're like me, video games have crept into every corner of your life and psyche. That's normal, right?

Video games have always been a big part of my life, so much so that I can't help seeing connections to them in the real world, kind of like how the Beautiful Mind guy sees numbers everywhere (though in reality, this is probably more accurate). In one of my first FTAP columns, I wrote about some of the real-life game crossovers I "played" during last year's E3, but that was just the tip of the iceberg.

I've spent the past couple days obsessing casually thinking about the commonalities that video game genres share with my day-to-day activities, and as it turns out, there's a lot of them! Below is a whole list of game genres and their totally ordinary real-life counterparts that I'm sure everyone who is a normal person like me can relate to. So let's get started!