Two Games I Can't Stop Playing

about X hours ago from
Two Games I Can't Stop Playing

I take great pride in the number of games I play each year. I know that's a silly thing to say, but the knowledge I gain from playing so many games is invaluable both for critiquing them and figuring out which ones we should cover here at Game Informer. In years past, after watching the credits roll on a game, I immediately moved on to the next one. I would rarely devote extra time to side content unless I absolutely wanted to see everything the game had to offer. I was more concerned with staying on top of all of the big releases. In the eight years I've chronicled what I've been playing, I've completed over 50 games each year as an average. The number of games I sample is well in the hundreds in each of those years as well. In each of these games I eventually reached a point where I felt like I should move on to something else. I've hit that point with every game I've put my hands on.

My Call Of Duty Friends Hate My New Nose

about X hours ago from
My Call Of Duty Friends Hate My New Nose

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 celebrated the holiday season with a marketplace filled with fun gestures and skins. Depending on how festive you wanted to be, you could make your character build a snowman, hold up a mistletoe, or even pull out a leg lamp inspired by The Christmas Story movie. I went bonkers and equipped all of this silly holiday-themed stuff, and even gave myself Rudolph's iconic red nose.

When I equipped it, I let out a laugh, and told a friend I was about to play with that I had just obtained the best look in the game. The preview view I had of the red nose made it seem like it was nothing more than a vibrant red coloration. I didn't know it lit up until after we jumped out of the helicopter and found a gas station to fortify. I squatted in a corner, looked over at my friend, and he burst out in laughter. "Dude, your nose is amazing," he crowed. "It's lighting up!"

He then grew silent for a few seconds before saying "It's kinda bright. Do you think enemies can see it?" We both agreed that they probably could, since all other cosmetics are visible to everyone, and that I should switch it after this match for fear of it giving away our location.

My Call Of Duty Friends Hate My New Nose

about X hours ago from
My Call Of Duty Friends Hate My New Nose

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 celebrated the holiday season with a marketplace filled with fun gestures and skins. Depending on how festive you wanted to be, you could make your character build a snowman, hold up a mistletoe, or even pull out a leg lamp inspired by The Christmas Story movie. I went bonkers and equipped all of this silly holiday-themed stuff, and even gave myself Rudolph's iconic red nose.

When I equipped it, I let out a laugh, and told a friend I was about to play with that I had just obtained the best look in the game. The preview view I had of the red nose made it seem like it was nothing more than a vibrant red coloration. I didn't know it lit up until after we jumped out of the helicopter and found a gas station to fortify. I squatted in a corner, looked over at my friend, and he burst out in laughter. "Dude, your nose is amazing," he crowed. "It's lighting up!"

He then grew silent for a few seconds before saying "It's kinda bright. Do you think enemies can see it?" We both agreed that they probably could, since all other cosmetics are visible to everyone, and that I should switch it after this match for fear of it giving away our location.

A Conversation With Sega's Localization Team On Censorship, Consistency, And Comedy

about X hours ago from
A Conversation With Sega's Localization Team On Censorship, Consistency, And Comedy

Earlier in 2018, we got a chance to sit down with some members of Sega's fantastic localization team. Sam Mullen, localization director at Sega/Atlus, and localization producer Andrew Davis joined us for a roundtable conversation about the ins and outs of localizing games like Yakuza and Persona. Rather than a traditional interview, Mullen and Davis mostly talked about how these games end up on U.S. shores, so we've presented the subject matter and posted what the two localizers talked about.

On localizing content that feels out-of-place or problematic in a different region:

Sam Mullen: I would say that's not an uncommon thing that happens and it's one of those really tricky things for us because, if we're too heavy-handed - like, let's say we do choose to do nothing. Our staff is really tuned into that kind of sentiment and all the stuff that goes around it, something we definitely think about a lot and talk about a lot. We look at it, we constantly engage in Japanese content and we understand that the things that different cultures react to is just different and we're very hyper-sensitive about that. We do nothing, though, and it's like walking into a wall and going "Well, people aren't going to like that."

A Conversation With Sega's Localization Team On Censorship, Consistency, And Comedy

about X hours ago from
A Conversation With Sega's Localization Team On Censorship, Consistency, And Comedy

Earlier in 2019, we got a chance to sit down with some members of Sega's fantastic localization team. Sam Mullen, localization director at Sega/Atlus, and localization producer Andrew Davis joined us for a roundtable conversation about the ins and outs of localizing games like Yakuza and Persona. Rather than a traditional interview, Mullen and Davis mostly talked about how these games end up on U.S. shores, so we've presented the subject matter and posted what the two localizers talked about.

On localizing content that feels out-of-place or problematic in a different region:

Sam Mullen: I would say that's not an uncommon thing that happens and it's one of those really tricky things for us because, if we're too heavy-handed - like, let's say we do choose to do nothing. Our staff is really tuned into that kind of sentiment and all the stuff that goes around it, something we definitely think about a lot and talk about a lot. We look at it, we constantly engage in Japanese content and we understand that the things that different cultures react to is just different and we're very hyper-sensitive about that. We do nothing, though, and it's like walking into a wall and going "Well, people aren't going to like that."

The Best Levels Feel Like Home

about X hours ago from
The Best Levels Feel Like Home

The inclination to go back home is probably one of the biggest themes that permeates all of human art: literature, cinema, paintings. It’s an alluring concept because, as Thomas Wolfe once said, you can’t go home again. Because home isn’t a place, it’s a state of mind, a mental box containing your childhood obsessions, your fraught or precious moments with your family, the foolish ambitions of youth. You can go back to the location you grew up, sure, but most of the time that desire is rooted to return to a moment in your life, when you were a particular person, a person you can't ever be again.

Except sometimes you can cheat.

The Best Levels Feel Like Home

about X hours ago from
The Best Levels Feel Like Home

The inclination to go back home is probably one of the biggest themes that permeates all of human art: literature, cinema, paintings. It’s an alluring concept because, as Thomas Wolfe once said, you can’t go home again. Because home isn’t a place, it’s a state of mind, a mental box containing your childhood obsessions, your fraught or precious moments with your family, the foolish ambitions of youth. You can go back to the location you grew up, sure, but most of the time that desire is rooted to return to a moment in your life, when you were a particular person, a person you can't ever be again.

Except sometimes you can cheat.

Fine, Here Are Some More Gaming Haikus

about X hours ago from
Fine, Here Are Some More Gaming Haikus

Why, hello there! Every year around this time, I like to reflect on the last 10 games I played and write haiku based on my experiences. What can I say? It's just something I do. Lucky for you, I also post my works so you, the reading public, can appreciate my efforts.

If you like this kind of stuff, you're clearly Very Smart and you can find more of my work hereherehereherehereherehere, and here. As always, you're welcome. Can we still say "Happy new year" now?

Overwatch Mystery heroes: It’s all I play anymore. Doomfist again? Crap.

Fine, Here Are Some More Gaming Haikus

about X hours ago from
Fine, Here Are Some More Gaming Haikus

Why, hello there! Every year around this time, I like to reflect on the last 10 games I played and write haiku based on my experiences. What can I say? It's just something I do. Lucky for you, I also post my works so you, the reading public, can appreciate my efforts.

If you like this kind of stuff, you're clearly Very Smart and you can find more of my work hereherehereherehereherehere, and here. As always, you're welcome. Can we still say "Happy new year" now?

Overwatch Mystery heroes: It’s all I play anymore. Doomfist again? Crap.

Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

about X hours ago from
Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

This article was originally published in issue 307 of Game Informer magazine.

Daigo Umehara isn’t sure he recalls the moment that made him famous. “I don’t even know if I remember it, or I know it because I’ve seen the video so many times,” he tells me.

In that video, Umehara is up against Justin Wong at the 2004 Evolution Championship Series (Evo) tournament for Street Fighter III: Third Strike. Umehara, with only a sliver of health left on his Ken, jockeys for position with Wong’s Chun-Li, who refuses to attack. Why would she? All Wong has to do is let the clock run out.