Watch Our In-Depth Discussion Of Portal With GI Game Club

about X hours ago from
Watch Our In-Depth Discussion Of Portal With GI Game Club

Update: Thanks for sending in your wonderful emails with thoughts on Portal 1, you're all the best. You can watch the full discussion below with Ben Hanson, Kyle Hilliard, Ben Reeves, and new video editor Leo Vader. We hope you enjoy the conversation!

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With the next rapid-fire entry in our ongoing GI Game Club series, we're taking a look back at 2007's Portal. Not Portal 2, just the original Portal. Several Game Informer editors are going to play through the game and talk about it in exhaustive detail on the next episode of The Game Informer Show podcast airing on June 7th. We're looking for your input. This is a great opportunity to go beyond the "Portal is brilliant" over-simplification and really dig into the how and why of the tiniest details on what makes the first Portal special. Please send in your focused and specific thoughts on what details stand out to you about Portal to podcast@gameinformer.com. Let's all find something new to say about this game.

The 10 Best Musical Performances Put On By Video Game Characters

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The 10 Best Musical Performances Put On By Video Game Characters

An Italian plumber once changed the world by traversing a two-dimensional landscape full of bricks, tubes, and mushrooms. It’s full of something else though, and that something, is music. Mario’s iconic theme song, along with red hat and overalls, helped bring him into the limelight as a harbinger of the industry’s revitalization. Games have come a long way since Mario stepped onto the screen, and their music is no exception. Video game music has evolved into a quintessential component of the gaming experience, even producing its own genre of games.

Soundtracks are notable in their ability to build atmosphere and shape the tone of a game. In some cases, however, music is used to build player-character relationships and foster empathy through the power of song. How can both the player and character hear the song, you ask? Fortunately, a term was created to solve that very conundrum. Diegetic music is a special style of music that originates within the story’s world, so both the audience and the characters are aware of it. It’s like sharing earbuds with someone but without the perpetual threat of earwax residue. From time to time, video game characters have produced their own music, which often leads to some very powerful moments. Here are 10 of the most meaningful performances by characters in a video game.

Ghost Recon Wildlands: Fallen Ghosts Expansion Feels Rote Despite Its New Challenge

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Ghost Recon Wildlands: Fallen Ghosts Expansion Feels Rote Despite Its New Challenge

Ubisoft has a unique relationship with expanded content for its campaign-focused titles. Rather than simply extend the storyline of the base game, it frequently challenges the status quo with unconventional approaches like the retro-futuristic Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon or alternative American-history storyline in Assassin’s Creed III: The Tyranny of King Washington. Ubisoft took this approach with the first expansion for Ghost Recon Wildlands, Narco Road, but the rally races, nitro boosts, and monster trucks felt more like a sad collection of abandoned Grand Theft Auto missions. Purists will likely prefer the latest, more straightforward expansion, Fallen Ghosts. Just don’t expect any drastic improvements on the base game. 

Fallen Ghosts opens after the events of the Wildlands campaign. With the Santa Blanca cartel in turmoil and the CIA involvement exposed by a data breach, the rogue Bolivian special operations division Unidad hires a high-tech mercenary group called Los Extranjeros to hunt down the American agents. This collection of opportunists is just as terrible for the local population as the cartel, but they prove more formidable against the Ghosts thanks to their cloaking and jamming devices, motion trackers, and plated armor. 

RPG Grind Time – The E3 2017 RPG Forecast

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RPG Grind Time – The E3 2017 RPG Forecast

Another E3 is on the horizon, which means we’ll soon be treated to a bevy of announcements, new trailers, and impressions of anticipated games. What will it hold for RPG fans? This year might not have an abundance of triple-A games, but there’s more than you’d think at first glance. For this Grind Time, I wanted to break down some my predictions, sharing my expectations and hopes for the show.

Square Enix Set For An Off Year

Let’s address the elephant in the room. I don’t expect many of Square’s big RPGs to be on the show floor. If anything, Square is going to use the show for announcements and new trailers. With the news of Kingdom Hearts III and Final Fantasy VII Remake launching in “the next three years or so” I don’t have high hopes to see them at the show. If we’re lucky, we might get new trailers, but I don’t even expect those to show off anything substantial. This morning, Square announced Dissidia Final Fantasy NT for PS4, which I suspect will be a big part of the show. It’s possible we’ll also get a look at the next character DLC for Final Fantasy XV. 

What The Heck Is This? Episode 9

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What The Heck Is This? Episode 9

We cover a lot of big, well-known games here at Game Informer. Thanks to these efforts, you (hopefully) know all about the next big franchise, or the highly-anticipated new game from that notable indie developer What about those random games that fly under the radar? The one among the dozens that release every day on Steam? Or that Xbox One game with the weird title? This new video series is an attempt to highlight those games – for better or worse.

We see these type of games all of the time. The game that we look at and say, "What the heck is that?" This is our chance to play them and decide, on the spot, if we want to keep playing them, or move on to to something different.

For episode nine we play a multiplayer hide and seek game called Witch It and try not to get our feelings hurt as we pursue a career in art with Passpartout: The Starving Artist.

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (June 8, 2017)

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Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (June 8, 2017)

Just like with the return of Gohan to prominence in recent episodes of Dragonball Super, Blog Herding makes a return to form and then some. While I know that some of you have no idea what that last sentence means, let's just say we have a super awesome edition of Blog Herding this week, thanks to all of G.I.'s wonderful bloggers.

Community Blogs For May 26 – June 7:

What Makes Success? StarterPack mulls over the reasons why a game is successful. It doesn't merely ponder why a certain game is a hit, but really looks at historical anecdotes about gaming in general and whether or not success can be gauged. Success, after all, means different things to different people.

E3 Bingo: 2017 Edition

about X hours ago from
E3 Bingo: 2017 Edition

The announcements and surprises will be flying during E3, and at the end of the week, gamers are the big winners. But what if you don't like that "greater good" stuff and would rather declare an individual victory? Well, then you can turn E3 into a game with this year's E3 Bingo.

Click here to play the 2017 version!

By following the link above, you'll be taken to a randomized Bingo card full of reveals and moments that we could potentially see on the show floor. Follow along with the press conferences, check the boxes as they occur, and see if you're a winner. You don't actually get anything for winning, except the pride of a job well done (due to random chance).

Friday The 13th: Seven Small Tweaks With Big Benefits

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Friday The 13th: Seven Small Tweaks With Big Benefits

Friday the 13th has been out for little over a week now, and while we're enjoying the tense cat-and-mouse action, a host of technical and design issues sour the experience. While players would always love more game content and improved net code, those kind of major additions/changes could take weeks or even months to create and implement. Instead, I've compiled a "bang for your buck" list full of small and easy tweaks that would greatly improve the player experience.

#1: Make Jason The HostFar and away, the biggest problem facing console players is Friday the 13th's lack of dedicated servers, coupled with the lack of host migration. As it stands, a player is chosen randomly to act as host, and if that player leaves during the match (say, after being unceremoniously murdered by Jason in the opening minutes), everyone else is abruptly kicked out to the title screen.

Massive — The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Is A Look Back And A Step Forward

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Massive — The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Is A Look Back And A Step Forward

Massively multiplayer online games are sprawling beasts that grow, improve, and change direction over time. Because of their scope and longevity, approaching them from a traditional review standpoint isn’t often the best fit. Enter Massive, our approach to analyzing and evaluating massively multiplayer online games.

After a lukewarm launch on PC, The Elder Scrolls Online’s first giant chapter update to the game has arrived. There’s a fun new class, a ton of new areas to explore, and small-scale player-vs-player for those looking to sink their swords and spells into other players.  While it's not being called an expansion exactly, all of those elements are in play - you just don't have to already be at the endgame to enjoy the vast majority of the new content.

While the new content and playspace is great, and a perfect place to begin your adventures (putting the other newbie zones that put players off to boring and laborious starts to shame), much of the enjoyment gleaned from my return to Morrowind wasn’t from the big changes or additions found in the new expansion-scale offering, but rather the significant tweaks and alterations that the game itself has experienced over its long run.