Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

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Super Replay – The Worst Sonic The Hedgehog Ever

When I decided to turn the 12.31 Super Replay into an annual event, I knew the focus needed to be on bad games. People enjoyed watching us suffer; that was the hook that stood out. We used Overblood as the foundation for the type of game we were looking for each year. Blue Stinger, Illbleed, And Martian Gothic were all games that delivered a similar stench. They were perfect selections for the annual Super Replay.

When Tim Turi left Game Informer to work at Capcom, I realized this Super Replay event wouldn't be the same without him. He played through all of these bad games, and, well, I don't think it would have been fair to continue on without him. Out of respect to Tim, we are moving away from the survival-horror angle, and are falling back on my original pitch: it needs to be a bad game period.

As it turns out, there are many different flavors of terrible video games, and I think we found another example in Sonic the Hedgehog that is every bit as enjoyable, campy, and unbearably bad as the original Overblood. The game is simply titled Sonic the Hedgehog, but it's often referred to as Sonic '06. It's developed by Sonic Team for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, and is another failed attempt to give the blue speedster new life.

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 16 Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 16 Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

Evil Geniuses CEO Peter Dager On Playing For, Building, And Managing An eSports Team

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Evil Geniuses CEO Peter Dager On Playing For, Building, And Managing An eSports Team

In this month’s issue of Game Informer we dove into the world of eSports, detailing how players, teams, and sponsors work with each other to make sure people who excel at games like Street Fighter, Halo, and more can make a living off their skills. Here at Gameinformer.com, we’re also taking a look at some of the periphery aspects of eSports vital to understanding the world of competitive gaming.

Peter “ppd” Dager is one eSports’ most recent success stories. What began as a few excursions in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and Heroes of Newerth tournaments eventually became something more when, in 2014, he signed up with Evil Geniuses’ Dota 2 squad. While on the team he helped elevate the North American Dota scene and scored a million-dollar paycheck when he won Dota 2’s The International tournament in 2015. Since then, he’s gone from captain of his team to CEO of his company, trading competitive glory for a quieter (but busier) lifestyle.

We recently caught up with Dager and talked to him about his early career, what it takes to pick the right lineup in a game like Dota 2, and why he made the transition from player to executive.

Replay – Grand Theft Auto IV

about X hours ago from
Replay – Grand Theft Auto IV

Grand Theft Auto IV and all of its story-based expansions are now available on Xbox One through backwards compatibility. If you haven't played through this open-world classic yet, this episode of Replay gives you a nice primer of what to expect. We dedicate the entire episode to looking at Grand Theft Auto IV's opening moments, showing how protagonist Niko Bellic's first days in America unfold. This brief look also shows off the dynamic life found in Liberty City. We may also enter a code or two to show just how crazy the action can get.

Our discussion ranges from ranking the top three Grand Theft Auto titles, to discussing where we would like to see the series go next. Feel free to share your insight into both of these topics in the comments section below. Thanks again for watching, and we'll see you again in another episode in seven short days.

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Funny To A Point – Living In The Age Of Spoilerphobia

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Funny To A Point – Living In The Age Of Spoilerphobia

Political strife. Worldwide chaos. Fictional plot twists. If that last one scares you the most, then spoiler: You've got problems. Luckily, you're not alone.

Few things get gamers more worked up than a potential spoiler*, and I don't think you have to be a paranoid nutjob to understand why (you may still be one, but you don't have to be one). Like other entertainment mediums, modern video games go to great lengths to tell intricate and nuanced stories, and most gamers want to experience those narratives firsthand, the way their authors intended. Finding out a key piece of information early can ruin the impact of a big reveal, or leave you guarded against characters and events that you suspect might be affected by it. Instead of being immersed in the story and characters, you become keenly aware of its structure – that unwanted bit of omnipotence transforms you from a player in the thick of the action to a detached observer. It's like knowing who the murderer is in a whodunit, while all the other characters get to gleefully suspect and accuse one another as they unravel the mystery (it's the butler, FYI. It's always the butler). It's like understanding the secret to a magician's trick – the rabbit was up his sleeve the whole time! It's not magic; it's just sleight of hand.

Everything We Know About The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild’s Dungeons

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Everything We Know About The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild’s Dungeons

Pictured: concept art for the dungeon we played.

One of the highlights of our time with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for our cover story was the opportunity to play through one of the game’s dungeons. The world is full of more than 100 shrines, which Nintendo has shown in detail during many of its Treehouse live streams, but those are different than dungeons. The shrines are small, offering a few puzzles, usually in one large room. The dungeon we played is more in line with what we have come to expect from a traditional Zelda dungeon – a large area with a series of interconnected rooms and puzzles followed by a boss.


A shrine entrance, seen from the outside.

How 10 Years Of Passion And Failed Pitches Led To Ubisoft's For Honor

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How 10 Years Of Passion And Failed Pitches Led To Ubisoft's For Honor

For Honor's creative director Jason VandenBerghe is a passionate guy. In this interview that originally aired on The Game Informer Show podcast, Ben Hanson speaks with VandenBerghe about the drive and vision it takes to bring a kernel of an idea about the emotions of combat through the process of becoming a AAA game developed by Ubisoft Montreal. VandenBerghe discusses why he loves intimate combat in games like Bushido Blade, how you inspire a development team, and why some of the character systems in For Honor might resemble Rainbow 6 Siege.

The game is now in open beta, and you can play it for free, or you can learn more of our thoughts on For Honor and see the game in action in this video of Matt Miller and Javy Gwaltney playing the closed beta. If you enjoy this interview, we recommend that you subscribe and listen to The Game Informer Show on iTunes or Google Play for more like it in the future!

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Side Quest Syndrome: Designing The Road Less Travelled

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Side Quest Syndrome: Designing The Road Less Travelled

 Editor's Note: The following article first appeared in Game Informer Australia Issue #85 and is written by David Milner. You can follow him on Twitter here.

Winning the loyalty of the Normandy’s crew as it prepares for a desperate suicide mission. Performing an exorcism on a wretched soul no longer fit to rule over a wild Skellige province. Discovering a tortured, talking tree in a hidden oasis – a placethat shouldn’t exist but somehow does – amongst the irradiated wastes of Washington D.C.

A good side quest can come to define a video game, giving life to its world, telling tales more intriguing and nuanced than any lying along the critical path.

Exclusive The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Screen Gallery

about X hours ago from
Exclusive The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Screen Gallery

Every time Nintendo releases a new Zelda game, it's a big deal, and Link's next adventure is the biggest entry in the series to date. For our March cover story, we had the opportunity to play through more of the game than anyone else outside of Nintendo and speak with Zelda's guardians, Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma. However, since pictures are worth a thousand words, here are a few exclusive Breath of the Wild screens, along with some details you may have missed from our cover reveal.
Click on each image to expand their size.


If you're not careful, Link can get struck by lightning. During a storm, Link will want to unequip his metal weapons and items.


Some of the random enemies that populate the world pose a significant challenge to Link during combat. Thankfully, if Link can take down these imposing foes, he’ll be able to use their most powerful weapons against them