Gris Is The Best Modern Game About Overcoming Trauma

about X hours ago from
Gris Is The Best Modern Game About Overcoming Trauma

The vast majority of stories are about restoration. Yearning to restore or replace what has been lost is a very human thing, after all. The desire for restoration is a theme that echoes throughout art maybe more than any other. You find the theme all over the place in games, from sophisticated titles aping popular cinema (like The Last Of Us with Joel's attempts to replace his lost daughter with Ellie) to games that aren't particularly focused on narrative, such as Tetris, where you're constantly trying to restore the game screen to its blankness by removing the lines of blocks.

One particular type of game trope involves having a protagonist restore a fallen world. In Dark Souls, your goal is to literally light up a kingdom in the darkness of a fallen age. In Breath Of The Wild, Link goes on a quest to take on Ganon so that Hyrule can begin to heal after a century of strife and ruin. Gris falls into this category of games as well, focusing on a young woman's journey to restore a broken world, but is remarkably unique and affecting in its presentation.

How Overwatch Should Move Away From Loot Boxes

about X hours ago from
How Overwatch Should Move Away From Loot Boxes

I keep telling myself that Overwatch's loot boxes are not that bad. I'm a fool for believing this. From the viewpoint of maintaining the integrity of the game, I'm not wrong: Overwatch's loot boxes aren't pay to win. The items they contain are purely cosmetic, and don't enhance player abilities or throw off the balance of competition in the slightest.

Is Overwatch a shining example of how loot boxes should be handled? Sure. Well, kind of. For fans who play Overwatch religiously like I do, and want to unlock the coolest items and skins for beloved heroes, the boxes seep a different kind of evil than pay to win. This form of evil is tied to a timer. When a new event like the holiday themed Winter Wonderland rolls around, you only have a certain number of days to unlock the exclusive items contained in the boxes. If you miss your chance, the items are no longer available. You end up feeling the pressure to either play more or pay more to get these desired boxes. Maybe I'm crazy in thinking this, but a game shouldn't make you feel guilty for not investing more time or spending more money in it. I know the money earned from the loot boxes supposedly funds the development of the free DLC, but that doesn't mean it has to make the player feel like they are missing out on something.

How Overwatch Should Move Away From Loot Boxes

about X hours ago from
How Overwatch Should Move Away From Loot Boxes

I keep telling myself that Overwatch's loot boxes are not that bad. I'm a fool for believing this. From the viewpoint of maintaining the integrity of the game, I'm not wrong: Overwatch's loot boxes aren't pay to win. The items they contain are purely cosmetic, and don't enhance player abilities or throw off the balance of competition in the slightest.

Is Overwatch a shining example of how loot boxes should be handled? Sure. Well, kind of. For fans who play Overwatch religiously like I do, and want to unlock the coolest items and skins for beloved heroes, the boxes seep a different kind of evil than pay to win. This form of evil is tied to a timer. When a new event like the holiday themed Winter Wonderland rolls around, you only have a certain number of days to unlock the exclusive items contained in the boxes. If you miss your chance, the items are no longer available. You end up feeling the pressure to either play more or pay more to get these desired boxes. Maybe I'm crazy in thinking this, but a game shouldn't make you feel guilty for not investing more time or spending more money in it. I know the money earned from the loot boxes supposedly funds the development of the free DLC, but that doesn't mean it has to make the player feel like they are missing out on something.

How From Software Is Changing Its Approach To Storytelling For Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How From Software Is Changing Its Approach To Storytelling For Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

Set in the waning years of Sengoku-era Japan, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice features a brighter, more colorful world than we’ve seen out of From Software. This lets them create environments with a different air about them than either Bloodborne or Dark Souls, as the developer tries to both elicit and play with the beauty of Japan during the Warring States period. The change in locale has also prompted From Software to make some key changes to how it tells stories, but it’s not shying away from the key methods fans have come to love.

For starters, don’t let the brighter environments in Sekiro fool you into thinking this will be a cheerier tale. “Of course, this being a From title, there’s beauty and there’s death and decay to contrast that,” says From manager of marketing and communications Yasuhiro Kitao. When choosing a time period for Sekiro, From chose the earlier Sengoku era over the more modern Edo period as its setting specifically because it fit the studio’s style. “Edo is more like Japan coming back from the brink, and really kind of revitalizing itself, and everything’s a lot more early-modern [stuff],” Kitao says. “Sengoku is much like Dark Souls and such, more medieval Japan, and allows us to play with those medieval concepts and those more mystical concepts.”

How From Software Is Changing Its Approach To Storytelling For Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How From Software Is Changing Its Approach To Storytelling For Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

Set in the waning years of Sengoku-era Japan, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice features a brighter, more colorful world than we’ve seen out of From Software. This lets them create environments with a different air about them than either Bloodborne or Dark Souls, as the developer tries to both elicit and play with the beauty of Japan during the Warring States period. The change in locale has also prompted From Software to make some key changes to how it tells stories, but it’s not shying away from the key methods fans have come to love.

For starters, don’t let the brighter environments in Sekiro fool you into thinking this will be a cheerier tale. “Of course, this being a From title, there’s beauty and there’s death and decay to contrast that,” says From manager of marketing and communications Yasuhiro Kitao. When choosing a time period for Sekiro, From chose the earlier Sengoku era over the more modern Edo period as its setting specifically because it fit the studio’s style. “Edo is more like Japan coming back from the brink, and really kind of revitalizing itself, and everything’s a lot more early-modern [stuff],” Kitao says. “Sengoku is much like Dark Souls and such, more medieval Japan, and allows us to play with those medieval concepts and those more mystical concepts.”

Our Most Anticipated RPGs Of 2019

about X hours ago from
Our Most Anticipated RPGs Of 2019

With 2018 in the rearview mirror, it’s time to turn to the year ahead. As an RPG fan, it’s always important to plan accordingly, since these games require time and commitment. As we get closer to wrapping up this console generation, developers are getting in their last efforts, and some are keeping tight-lipped about the future. However, that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot to be excited about on both the Japanese and Western fronts. Popular series such as Kingdom Hearts and Wasteland have new entries alongside new titles, such as Pokémon developer Game Freak’s Town and Obsidian's The Outer Worlds. Find out about these RPGs and more coming in 2019 below.

Note: Entries are listed in alphabetical order

Release: Summer Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

Our Most Anticipated RPGs Of 2019

about X hours ago from
Our Most Anticipated RPGs Of 2019

With 2018 in the rearview mirror, it’s time to turn to the year ahead. As an RPG fan, it’s always important to plan accordingly, since these games require time and commitment. As we get closer to wrapping up this console generation, developers are getting in their last efforts, and some are keeping tight-lipped about the future. However, that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot to be excited about on both the Japanese and Western fronts. Popular series such as Kingdom Hearts and Wasteland have new entries alongside new titles, such as Pokémon developer Game Freak’s Town and Obsidian's The Outer Worlds. Find out about these RPGs and more coming in 2019 below.

Note: Entries are listed in alphabetical order

Release: Summer Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

Science-Fiction Weekly – Spider-Man, Weird City, Atom RPG, Star Trek

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Spider-Man, Weird City, Atom RPG, Star Trek

Spider-Man: Far From Home's teaser trailer just hit the internet earlier this morning, and immediately made Marvel fans start arguing. Why are they at each others' throats? There's a debate brewing over who or what the elemental beings are. Some people believe these creatures are hallucinations created by Mysterio, which he quickly deals with in an attempt to paint himself as a hero. Other people (myself included) believe they are dimension hopping beings called The Elementals, which debuted a comic book series called Supernatural Thrillers in 1974. Another group of people think we're seeing Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Whatever Is Creating That Storm Man.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Spider-Man, Weird City, Atom RPG, Star Trek

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Spider-Man, Weird City, Atom RPG, Star Trek

Spider-Man: Far From Home's teaser trailer just hit the internet earlier this morning, and immediately made Marvel fans start arguing. Why are they at each others' throats? There's a debate brewing over who or what the elemental beings are. Some people believe these creatures are hallucinations created by Mysterio, which he quickly deals with in an attempt to paint himself as a hero. Other people (myself included) believe they are dimension hopping beings called The Elementals, which debuted a comic book series called Supernatural Thrillers in 1974. Another group of people think we're seeing Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Whatever Is Creating That Storm Man.

Our Most Anticipated Tabletop Games Of 2019

about X hours ago from
Our Most Anticipated Tabletop Games Of 2019

2018 brought us a ton of great tabletop games, and you can read about some of our favorites in our awards for the best board, card, and miniature games, as well as a separate list that recounts some of the very best tabletop role-playing products of 2018. If you’ve already turned your eye toward the future, you’re ready to get a glimpse of what’s coming next in the hobby. To that end, here are some of the most-anticipated games coming to your table in 2019.

Entries are listed alphabetically.