Don't Buy Overkill's The Walking Dead Yet

about X hours ago from
Don't Buy Overkill's The Walking Dead Yet

Overkill’s The Walking Dead released yesterday, and we’ve gotten a start on exploring the post-apocalyptic survival mechanics of this latest release. But after the first several hours of play, I feel compelled to offer a warning ahead of our official review; my first impressions aren’t good. Gameplay tedium, technical matchmaking problems, poor balance, and more than one game crash in just a few hours of play all suggest that The Walking Dead is just like any zombie – something better kept outside your home. While I continue to play to see if my experience changes, it’s currently not a game I can recommend to survival fans or even hardcore fans of the comics or TV show.

Overkill’s The Walking Dead has a promising premise, allowing players to team up to fight both the hordes of walkers, but also the other human survivors that threaten your group’s survival. Level up a camp, defend it, and go out scavenging. Improve one or more of several distinct survivors, each with their own abilities and specialties. I entered into the game with some enthusiasm about what awaited me.

However, problems are apparent almost right away. As of today, I’ve yet to successfully matchmake with another player or group, and I’ve been forced to either play solo or with one other Game Informer editor. In a cooperation-focused survival game, matchmaking problems on day one are a big deal.

Don't Buy Overkill's The Walking Dead Yet

about X hours ago from
Don't Buy Overkill's The Walking Dead Yet

Overkill’s The Walking Dead released yesterday, and we’ve gotten a start on exploring the post-apocalyptic survival mechanics of this latest release. But after the first several hours of play, I feel compelled to offer a warning ahead of our official review; my first impressions aren’t good. Gameplay tedium, technical matchmaking problems, poor balance, and more than one game crash in just a few hours of play all suggest that The Walking Dead is just like any zombie – something better kept outside your home. While I continue to play to see if my experience changes, it’s currently not a game I can recommend to survival fans or even hardcore fans of the comics or TV show.

Overkill’s The Walking Dead has a promising premise, allowing players to team up to fight both the hordes of walkers, but also the other human survivors that threaten your group’s survival. Level up a camp, defend it, and go out scavenging. Improve one or more of several distinct survivors, each with their own abilities and specialties. I entered into the game with some enthusiasm about what awaited me.

However, problems are apparent almost right away. As of today, I’ve yet to successfully matchmake with another player or group, and I’ve been forced to either play solo or with one other Game Informer editor. In a cooperation-focused survival game, matchmaking problems on day one are a big deal.

Arthur Morgan Is A Better Protagonist Than John Marston

about X hours ago from
Arthur Morgan Is A Better Protagonist Than John Marston

A few weeks ago, I dedicated a fair amount of words to talking about why the original Red Dead Redemption’s protagonist John Marston is, to put it plainly, so damn good. Since then I finally got the chance to sink my teeth into Red Dead Redemption II, dedicating five days to playing through the massive story. While RDR II is already shaping up to be a divisive game due to its abundance of systems, realism quirks, and bleak tone, I count myself among those floored by the game’s achievements. It’s simply the best game I’ve played since Mass Effect 2, my favorite game of all time, and with Game Of The Year discussions looming in the months to come, I’m sure I’ll have several opportunities to make the case for Red Dead Redemption II’s virtues.

Arthur Morgan Is A Better Protagonist Than John Marston

about X hours ago from
Arthur Morgan Is A Better Protagonist Than John Marston

A few weeks ago, I dedicated a fair amount of words to talking about why the original Red Dead Redemption’s protagonist John Marston is, to put it plainly, so damn good. Since then I finally got the chance to sink my teeth into Red Dead Redemption II, dedicating five days to playing through the massive story. While RDR II is already shaping up to be a divisive game due to its abundance of systems, realism quirks, and bleak tone, I count myself among those floored by the game’s achievements. It’s simply the best game I’ve played since Mass Effect 2, my favorite game of all time, and with Game Of The Year discussions looming in the months to come, I’m sure I’ll have several opportunities to make the case for Red Dead Redemption II’s virtues.

What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

about X hours ago from
What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

Red Dead Redemption II has a giant (and wonderful) single-player campaign that can take upwards of 80 hours to complete. Hardcore players have already barreled through to the epilogue, but many others are taking their leisurely pace through Rockstar's meticulous open world, soaking up all the sights and sounds. 

Soon, that world will evolve to include the highly anticipated online component. Details are still scarce about what we can expect from the mode, but based on the activities in the campaign, a lot of possibilities exist for Rockstar to move well beyond adversarial modes and criminal organizations and into slower, period-appropriate activities that could add a dramatically different new audience to the world. While the gunslingers are off playing outlaw and bounty hunter, perhaps players who normally flock to games like Stardew Valley will drive the economy by hunting and harvesting the supplies necessary to fill store shelves. Maybe crews can build and maintain their own homesteads as well. We're excited to see which directions Rockstar explores. 

What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

about X hours ago from
What Are Your Expectations For Red Dead Online?

Red Dead Redemption II has a giant (and wonderful) single-player campaign that can take upwards of 80 hours to complete. Hardcore players have already barreled through to the epilogue, but many others are taking their leisurely pace through Rockstar's meticulous open world, soaking up all the sights and sounds. 

Soon, that world will evolve to include the highly anticipated online component. Details are still scarce about what we can expect from the mode, but based on the activities in the campaign, a lot of possibilities exist for Rockstar to move well beyond adversarial modes and criminal organizations and into slower, period-appropriate activities that could add a dramatically different new audience to the world. While the gunslingers are off playing outlaw and bounty hunter, perhaps players who normally flock to games like Stardew Valley will drive the economy by hunting and harvesting the supplies necessary to fill store shelves. Maybe crews can build and maintain their own homesteads as well. We're excited to see which directions Rockstar explores. 

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.

50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

about X hours ago from
50 Percent Of Blizzard Projects Never See The Light of Day

Blizzard has a number of well-known games we've heard about (and even played in some cases) that never saw release – Starcraft: Ghost, Titan, and Warcraft Adventures, to name a few. In addition, Blizzard has killed numerous titles we've never even heard about. Executive producer Allen Adham told us a little about how the process works during an interview at BlizzCon 2018.

"We have roughly a 50-percent success rate," he says. "I do a presentation internally for Blizzard and for the Activision companies at large, sometimes our brothers and sisters at King or Activision, Treyarch, Sledgehammer, Infinity Ward, they’re curious to hear how our incubation process works. I have a slide where it shows a curtain, you know, and how does Blizzard consistently make great games and it shows a picture of Blizzard covered by a curtain, and the next slide is this terrifying-looking clown. The truth is, behind the curtain, it’s a horror show. But most people outside of Blizzard don’t realize around half of our titles don’t see the light of day. So, people who think we’re a consistent company, we’re only consistent in that we only release the really amazing games."

Those games that never see the light of day aren't just left on the cutting-room floor. Adham says many elements are repurposed.