Love Overwatch? Try Dice Throne

about X hours ago from
Love Overwatch? Try Dice Throne

Back when Game Informer first began to explore tabletop gaming coverage, I’d often headline new game recommendations as direct comparisons to familiar video game genres like first-person shooters or dungeon crawlers. In more recent years, we’ve used that type of comparison less frequently. But this week’s recommendation of Dice Throne can’t help but draw some correlations for players discovering it while crossing over from the world of video games. Within the tabletop world, Dice Throne is innovative and surprising, with a brisk play time, flexible strategy, and tremendous replayability thanks to a growing bank of playable characters. But with its asymmetrical heroes, stylized art, abilities (including Ultimates), broad accessibility, and multiple modes of play, video gamers will immediately recognize a kinship with Blizzard’s stellar Overwatch. And that’s a great thing; Dice Throne is a lot of fun, and deserves your attention.

The Video Game Industry Says A Fond Farewell To Reggie Fils-Aimé

about X hours ago from
The Video Game Industry Says A Fond Farewell To Reggie Fils-Aimé

With the recent announcement that Nintendo's corporate darling, Reggie Fils-Aimé, is stepping down this April, Twitter is full of people from around the video game industry thanking him for his time in the spotlight. It speaks to his impact that people from all around games are feeling affected by this changing of the guard.

You can watch Reggie's heartfelt farewell below and see a collection of thoughts and well-wishes for the man who has guided Nintendo of America through the revolution that was the Wii, learned something from the mistakes of the Wii U, and can now leave with his head held high after the success of the Switch.

Reggie, thanks for all the games and your leadership in our industry. We are a better and brighter place for your wisdom and efforts. With appreciation and best wishes from all your friends @PlayStation

The Video Game Industry Says A Fond Farewell To Reggie Fils-Aime

about X hours ago from
The Video Game Industry Says A Fond Farewell To Reggie Fils-Aime

With the recent announcement that Nintendo's corporate darling, Reggie Fils-Aimé, is stepping down this April, Twitter is full of people from around the video game industry thanking him for his time in the spotlight. It speaks to his impact that people from all around games are feeling affected by this changing of the guard.

You can watch Reggie's heartfelt farewell below and see a collection of thoughts and well-wishes for the man who has guided Nintendo of America through the revolution that was the Wii, learned something from the mistakes of the Wii U, and can now leave with his head held high after the success of the Switch.

Thanks for everything, Reggie!

Our Hopes and Fears For Fire Emblem: Three Houses

about X hours ago from
Our Hopes and Fears For Fire Emblem: Three Houses

The latest Nintendo Direct gave us our first big look at Fire Emblem: Three Houses for Switch. To say I’ve been anticipating this game is an understatement. I love that the series is getting back on a home console, which we haven’t seen since 2007’s Radiant Dawn for Wii. The Direct brought more questions than answers on what type of game Fire Emblem: Three Houses will be, but nonetheless, made me just as excited for it.

Fire Emblem is an amazing series; I grew up playing the strategy/RPG, and Awakening no doubt brought new life into it. While Fates didn’t quite reach the same high bar, it still had some interesting ideas like MyCastle. Three Houses is an opportunity for Intelligent Systems to raise the bar and take the series into new territory. I felt now would be a good time to assess what has been shown off and also talk about our hopes for the game, so I enlisted fellow Fire Emblem fan Javy Gwaltney to discuss more about the latest entry and our early impressions.

Kim: Okay, Javy, we finally saw some gameplay and got more information on Fire Emblem: Three Houses. We’ve had a few days to process it now. What did you think in general?

Our Hopes and Fears For Fire Emblem: Three Houses

about X hours ago from
Our Hopes and Fears For Fire Emblem: Three Houses

The latest Nintendo Direct gave us our first big look at Fire Emblem: Three Houses for Switch. To say I’ve been anticipating this game is an understatement. I love that the series is getting back on a home console, which we haven’t seen since 2007’s Radiant Dawn for Wii. The Direct brought more questions than answers on what type of game Fire Emblem: Three Houses will be, but nonetheless, made me just as excited for it.

Fire Emblem is an amazing series; I grew up playing the strategy/RPG, and Awakening no doubt brought new life into it. While Fates didn’t quite reach the same high bar, it still had some interesting ideas like MyCastle. Three Houses is an opportunity for Intelligent Systems to raise the bar and take the series into new territory. I felt now would be a good time to assess what has been shown off and also talk about our hopes for the game, so I enlisted fellow Fire Emblem fan Javy Gwaltney to discuss more about the latest entry and our early impressions.

Kim: Okay, Javy, we finally saw some gameplay and got more information on Fire Emblem: Three Houses. We’ve had a few days to process it now. What did you think in general?

New Dawn Is What I’ve Always Wanted From Far Cry

about X hours ago from
New Dawn Is What I’ve Always Wanted From Far Cry

Far Cry 5 launched last year to divisive reactions. Count me among those who flat-out did not care for the game. The series’ strong gunplay and sturdy progression system remained, but years of chasing after Vaas’ brand of villainy and edgy storytelling made Far Cry 5’s narrative nearly unbearable.  The attempts to balance wacky shenanigans with a grim story about cults and apocalypse fever were an absolute failure. In one scene, you’d be listening to dude in a man-bun recycling 50 different the-end-is-nigh monologues. In another, you’d be hunting bulls so you could chop off their testicles for a barbecue. It all just mixed like oil and water, resulting in one of the weakest entries in the series.

New Dawn Is What I’ve Always Wanted From Far Cry

about X hours ago from
New Dawn Is What I’ve Always Wanted From Far Cry

Far Cry 5 launched last year to divisive reactions. Count me among those who flat-out did not care for the game. The series’ strong gunplay and sturdy progression system remained, but years of chasing after Vaas’ brand of villainy and edgy storytelling made Far Cry 5’s narrative nearly unbearable.  The attempts to balance wacky shenanigans with a grim story about cults and apocalypse fever were an absolute failure. In one scene, you’d be listening to dude in a man-bun recycling 50 different the-end-is-nigh monologues. In another, you’d be hunting bulls so you could chop off their testicles for a barbecue. It all just mixed like oil and water, resulting in one of the weakest entries in the series.

Everything We Know About Companions In The Outer Worlds

about X hours ago from
Everything We Know About Companions In The Outer Worlds

You may be exploring a faraway star system in The Outer Worlds, but that doesn’t mean you need to be lonely. You encounter other people during your travels who are willing to fight by your side and join your crew, and who enrich your experience by offering different perspectives. We talked to a team of writers at Obsidian to get specific info on three of the companions you can recruit, as well as various other tidbits about the studio’s general approach to these characters.

Generally, one writer handles all of a companion’s interactions If you take a liking to one particular companion, odds are good that you have a single member of Obsidian’s writing team to thank. Though parts of the process are certainly collaborative, all of a character’s interactions are usually guided by one person for consistency’s sake. “It’s a lot easier to keep any character in the hands of one person, because everyone’s going to put their own spin on a character to some extent,” says senior narrative designer Carrie Patel. “The more a character changes hands, the more you’re getting multiple different executions, multiple different flavors.”

Everything We Know About Companions In The Outer Worlds

about X hours ago from
Everything We Know About Companions In The Outer Worlds

You may be exploring a faraway star system in The Outer Worlds, but that doesn’t mean you need to be lonely. You encounter other people during your travels who are willing to fight by your side and join your crew, and who enrich your experience by offering different perspectives. We talked to a team of writers at Obsidian to get specific info on three of the companions you can recruit, as well as various other tidbits about the studio’s general approach to these characters.

Generally, one writer handles all of a companion’s interactions If you take a liking to one particular companion, odds are good that you have a single member of Obsidian’s writing team to thank. Though parts of the process are certainly collaborative, all of a character’s interactions are usually guided by one person for consistency’s sake. “It’s a lot easier to keep any character in the hands of one person, because everyone’s going to put their own spin on a character to some extent,” says senior narrative designer Carrie Patel. “The more a character changes hands, the more you’re getting multiple different executions, multiple different flavors.”

Double Dragon – The Forgotten Bad Video Game Movie

about X hours ago from
Double Dragon – The Forgotten Bad Video Game Movie

Double Dragon was a phenomenon when it hit arcades in the late ’80s. Light on story and big on martial-arts combat, it tasked a pair of brothers with saving a damsel in distress, eventually forcing them to turn on each other. The game inhaled quarters and received numerous ports to home consoles, and at some point, its film rights were purchased. Even with a group of promising writers, the film didn’t turn out well due to an inexperienced director and a collection of producers who didn’t know what they wanted.

This article originally appeared abridged in the February 2019 issue of Game Informer. The movie also released on Blu-ray for the first time last month.