Science-Fiction Weekly – Destiny 2, Echo, Star Wars, Star Trek

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Science-Fiction Weekly – Destiny 2, Echo, Star Wars, Star Trek

In Ultra Ultra's upcoming science-fiction game, Echo, you are not just the protagonist – you also play the role every enemy. How is this possible? Describing that exactly will be difficult, as the answer unfolds in several ways. The easiest to grasp is you play as a character named En, and every enemy is a clone of her. From what I understand, you won't see any other humans in this game. They all look exactly like you, and the only differentiating factor between the clones is a red cube (called simply "The Cube") fastened to your En's back.

The difficulty in describing Echo comes from the artificial intelligence that drives the doppelgangers. Every action you make is reflected by them, but not immediately. Rolling blackouts also double as updates for the clone A.I. After a blackout, if you vault over a ledge, grab an item, and step into water, when the next blackout hits, the enemies will learn how to do these things. They will forget them if you don't use the again before the next blackout. Make sense?

Tooth And Tail Is An Indie RTS With A Great Sense Of Style

about X hours ago from
Tooth And Tail Is An Indie RTS With A Great Sense Of Style

Tooth and Tail is the newest game from the creator of the indie heist hit Monaco. This unique take on RTS allows players to lead a revolution with an army of flamethrowing Boars, mustard gas-lobbing Skunks, and paratrooper-puking Owls.
Dan Tack and Ben Reeves take a whirl through the game’s opening chapters and talk about the simplified controls and charming characters before checking out the multiplayer offerings.

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Here Are 57 Fun, Family-Friendly Words To Yell When You Get Mad In Destiny 2

about X hours ago from
Here Are 57 Fun, Family-Friendly Words To Yell When You Get Mad In Destiny 2

Destiny 2 has been a blast to play since it released last week, but as in any game, players have had their fair share of frustrations when faced with a tough encounter. In these moments, it's easy to catch oneself wondering, "What can I exclaim right now to vent my frustrations?" With so many words to choose from, it can be tough to know you're using the right one. To help, I present this list of work-safe, fun, and stress-relieving phrases for your future reference.

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For more nuanced thoughts on Destiny 2, check out our discussion on the latest episode of the GI Show.

The Sports Desk – Sports Story Modes' Inevitable Finale

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – Sports Story Modes' Inevitable Finale

Story-based modes are all the rage these days, and I'm thankful games like Madden, FIFA, and NBA are including them. They not only give us something different to experience, but they are well done, too. While these story modes expand the horizons of these games, the possibilities are not limitless. Enjoy these stories now, because it won't last.

The bubble will burst – not because the quality or the willingness isn't there – but because I believe video game sports stories are self-limiting. They are entrenched in a mythical environment of these sports and conform to our perception of them. Comeback kids, nostalgia-tinged odes to the game, grinders ascending to the big leagues, triumph over adversity, etc. These are understandable stories we've seen many times over in books, films, and real life. When I imagine what these story modes are going to be like after years of iteration, I don't think there are enough of them in the sports storybook canon to support the form in the long term. Besides, they are always going to be limited by the need to be grounded in reality. Unlike other video game genres, for example, you can't go off in fantastic directions like super powers or whatnot.

Extended Hands-On Impressions With Middle-earth: Shadow Of War

about X hours ago from
Extended Hands-On Impressions With Middle-earth: Shadow Of War

As you have likely already seen, Middle-earth: Shadow of War is on the cover of this month's issue of Game Informer. To get as full of a picture of the game as possible, a team of GI editors flew out to the offices of Monolith to not only meet with multiple key members of the development team, but also play several hours of the game.

Following our lengthy gameplay session, senior previews editor Matt Miller and I sat down to discuss our overall impressions of Middle-earth: Shadow of War. You can read our conversation below, and for more on the game, be sure to visit our coverage hub.

Matt: Brian, you and I recently returned from a lengthy visit to Monolith, where we got to play several hours of a near-final version of Shadow of War. Top-level thoughts? What did you think of what you played?

The Beauty Of Destiny 2 Captured In Screens

about X hours ago from
The Beauty Of Destiny 2 Captured In Screens

From this point on, the conversations surrounding Destiny 2 will likely be about raids, exotics, and shaders. One thing that isn't recognized enough is just how damn gorgeous the game is. That beauty is so pronounced it can be distracting. I don't know how many times that I was hit by moments of sensory overload, not just from the number of enemies that would swarm the screen, but by the amount of detail included in the environments. This is one of those games where I would periodically stop dead in my tracks to take a complete scan of what was around me. Often, every angle would produce something spectacular to look at, whether it was the detail included in a city or how beautifully framed the galaxy is in the sky box.

Below is a gallery that highlights just a small taste of how beautiful this game is.

Opinion: We Need To Talk About PewDiePie

about X hours ago from
Opinion: We Need To Talk About PewDiePie

Yesterday, Felix Kjellberg, aka PewDiePie, uttered a racial slur while streaming PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. We wrote a news piece about it. The responses to the article were a mixed bag. There were plenty of readers who were appalled and disturbed by the instance. However, in the past 24 hours, supporters have come to Kjellberg's defense, saying that he's not a racist, that he said what he said in a "heated moment of gaming," that he's a shock jock, that the media is out to smear his good image, that people who play Call of Duty say these things all of the time. Perhaps the most disheartening response was that Felix Kjellberg spouting a racial slur was not news in the slightest.

Replay – Battlefield: Bad Company

about X hours ago from
Replay – Battlefield: Bad Company

The arrival of Destiny is the first salvo fired in what we like to call "shooter season," a series of months where most of our gaming time goes to newly released FPS experiences. This year, shooter season consists of new entries for Star Wars Battlefront, Call of Duty, Wolfenstein, and Quake. We also just received a new expansion for Battlefield 1. As great as DICE's support for Battlefield 1 has been, we're still left wanting one more thing. We want more Bad Company.

PC players probably don't hold Bad Company in the highest regard, as the first entry was a console exclusive with a completely different approach to multiplayer, but change ended up being good for Battlefield, especially in terms of storytelling. We take a look at what made Bad Company so special, and discuss why now might be a good time for the series to return in a big way.

We then turn back the clock even more to take a look at another team of "bad" characters on Sega Genesis. You'll even get a tease of the forthcoming Replay Civil War, which replaces Showdown as this year's huge office-wide competition.

How Does Metroid II Compare To Its Remakes

about X hours ago from
How Does Metroid II Compare To Its Remakes

In August of 1986, Nintendo released the first sequel to Metroid on the Game Boy. The game looks pretty archaic today thanks to the handheld's limitations. However, the game had a solid structure and has been remade by both Nintendo and its fans. So how do all three version stack up?

Join Leo Vader and Ben Reeves as they compare the opening areas of Metroid II with the fan remake AM2R and the upcoming 3DS release Metroid: Samus Returns.

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Top Of The Table – Scythe

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Top Of The Table – Scythe

From time to time, my focus in Top of the Table shifts toward accessible titles that can help to introduce tabletop gaming to new players, through titles like Flick 'em Up or Codenames: Pictures. Those games are excellent, but this week's selection is squarely targeted at veteran gamers ready for their next big adventure. Designed by Jamey Stegmaier, Scythe is a sophisticated and inventive strategy board game of area control, resource management and development, and competition, for one to five players. An alternate history post-World War I setting is gorgeously illustrated by Jakub Rozalski, and realized through storytelling nuggets, card art, and overall presentation. However, it's Scythe's streamlined and fast-moving play (without ever simplifying) that earns it a place as one of my favorite new games of the last several years.