Replay – Kingdom Hearts: Dream Drop Distance

about X hours ago from
Replay – Kingdom Hearts: Dream Drop Distance

With Kingdom Hearts III just days away from release, we invited Kim Wallace on the show to catch us up on the series. Our goal was simple: We wanted Kim to convince us that it would be okay to jump into Kingdom Hearts III without playing any of the other games. She cautioned against that in her review saying "newcomers (and even old fans who have just missed a few entries) will probably have a hard time following many portions [of the story.]" She didn't budge from that stance, but we were able to ask her exactly what we would be missing out on, and she walked us through it.

These questions were volleyed to the backdrop of Kingdom Hearts: Dream Drop Distance, a loved 3DS side installment that is a part of a PlayStation 4 collection. We took a look at the console version, and Ben Reeves did his best to make progress within it. Former Game Informer editor Bryan Vore gave the 3DS version an 8.25 out of 10 review score, and had this to say about it:

How To Survive The Night In Resident Evil 2

about X hours ago from
How To Survive The Night In Resident Evil 2

Resident Evil 2 is a traditional survival-horror game, which means ammo and healing items are a limited resource. If you’re struggling to survive your march through Racoon City’s infested streets, here are some spoiler-free tips and tricks that you might not be using.

Aim High – Everyone knows that you need to shoot zombies in the head to take them out. However, this is extra challenging in Resident Evil 2 because the undead stumble around. If your headshots aren’t producing the juicy head splatters you expect, that might be because you’re not aiming for the brainpan. You do the most damage if you hit a zombie in the brain, so shots to the nose, mouth, and neck aren’t really going to cut it. Ammo is precious, and you don’t want to waste it by shooting zombies where it doesn’t count.

How To Survive The Night In Resident Evil 2

about X hours ago from
How To Survive The Night In Resident Evil 2

Resident Evil 2 is a traditional survival-horror game, which means ammo and healing items are a limited resource. If you’re struggling to survive your march through Racoon City’s infested streets, here are some spoiler-free tips and tricks that you might not be using.

Aim High – Everyone knows that you need to shoot zombies in the head to take them out. However, this is extra challenging in Resident Evil 2 because the undead stumble around. If your headshots aren’t producing the juicy head splatters you expect, that might be because you’re not aiming for the brainpan. You do the most damage if you hit a zombie in the brain, so shots to the nose, mouth, and neck aren’t really going to cut it. Ammo is precious, and you don’t want to waste it by shooting zombies where it doesn’t count.

Top Of The Table – Azul

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Azul

Longtime readers of this column know I’m particularly fond of games with unique themes, settings, and narrative conceits. While I’ll always enjoy giant fantasy war games or treks across outer space, there’s something refreshing about finding a great game hidden away in an unusual setup. Azul casts players as tile-laying artists in the late 15th or early 16th centuries, employed by the king of Portugal to create art for the palace walls.

Laying tiles on a wall certainly isn’t the stuff of legend, but the concept opens the door to some gorgeous game components and a fascinating gameplay loop of abstract strategy; once you wrap your mind around the structure of play, I promise you’ll warm to the theme in turn.

Azul melds a tile-drafting mechanic with collecting particular configurations or sets of those same tiles as you lay them out on a personal board. At its highest level, the sophistication emerges because there are so many paths to success, and on every turn, your choices are meaningful. Gameplay moves quickly, whether you’re playing with two, three, or four players, so it’s easy to enjoy several games in a row in a given sitting. Moreover, the game is simple enough to teach that players should grasp the fundamentals almost immediately; understanding the many paths to a win is much harder.

Top Of The Table – Azul

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Azul

Longtime readers of this column know I’m particularly fond of games with unique themes, settings, and narrative conceits. While I’ll always enjoy giant fantasy war games or treks across outer space, there’s something refreshing about finding a great game hidden away in an unusual setup. Azul casts players as tile-laying artists in the late 15th or early 16th centuries, employed by the king of Portugal to create art for the palace walls.

Laying tiles on a wall certainly isn’t the stuff of legend, but the concept opens the door to some gorgeous game components and a fascinating gameplay loop of abstract strategy; once you wrap your mind around the structure of play, I promise you’ll warm to the theme in turn.

Azul melds a tile-drafting mechanic with collecting particular configurations or sets of those same tiles as you lay them out on a personal board. At its highest level, the sophistication emerges because there are so many paths to success, and on every turn, your choices are meaningful. Gameplay moves quickly, whether you’re playing with two, three, or four players, so it’s easy to enjoy several games in a row in a given sitting. Moreover, the game is simple enough to teach that players should grasp the fundamentals almost immediately; understanding the many paths to a win is much harder.

Our Full Hidetaka Miyazaki Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Interview

about X hours ago from
Our Full Hidetaka Miyazaki Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Interview

As part of our trip to see Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice at From Software’s offices in Tokyo, Japan, we got to chat with the game’s director and company president Hidetaka Miyazaki. While you’ll see quotes from him we’ve used in our past coverage of Sekiro, there are some interesting and fun bits of insight throughout our entire conversation.

This interview was conducted with a translator on-site and then transcribed by Jill Grodt and JP Gemborys.

Game Informer: We had a chance to see Sekiro and take on the Lady Butterfly. Is she some sort of shadowy gang of assassins from his past that he was a part of, or something like that? Because, it seemed like they knew each other. What’s the story between Sekiro and this memory?

Hidetaka Miyazaki On The Inspirations Behind Sekiro, Avoiding Stagnation, And The Bloodborne Nod In Déraciné

about X hours ago from
Hidetaka Miyazaki On The Inspirations Behind Sekiro, Avoiding Stagnation, And The Bloodborne Nod In Déraciné

As part of our trip to see Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice at From Software’s offices in Tokyo, Japan, we got to chat with the game’s director and company president Hidetaka Miyazaki. While you’ll see quotes from him we’ve used in our past coverage of Sekiro, there are some interesting and fun bits of insight throughout our entire conversation.

This interview was conducted with a translator on-site and then transcribed by Jill Grodt and JP Gemborys.

Game Informer: We had a chance to see Sekiro and take on the Lady Butterfly. Is she some sort of shadowy gang of assassins from his past that he was a part of, or something like that? Because, it seemed like they knew each other. What’s the story between Sekiro and this memory?

Our Full Hidetaka Miyazaki Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Interview

about X hours ago from
Our Full Hidetaka Miyazaki Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Interview

As part of our trip to see Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice at From Software’s offices in Tokyo, Japan, we got to chat with the game’s director and company president Hidetaka Miyazaki. While you’ll see quotes from him we’ve used in our past coverage of Sekiro, there are some interesting and fun bits of insight throughout our entire conversation.

This interview was conducted with a translator on-site and then transcribed by Jill Grodt and JP Gemborys.

Game Informer: We had a chance to see Sekiro and take on the Lady Butterfly. Is she some sort of shadowy gang of assassins from his past that he was a part of, or something like that? Because, it seemed like they knew each other. What’s the story between Sekiro and this memory?

Leaving The Rails

about X hours ago from
Leaving The Rails

Nuclear dread has always hung over Andriy Prokhorov’s head. Growing up in the Soviet Union in the 1970s, the Cold War loomed large. Each week during grade school, teachers walked students through civil defense lessons detailing what to do in the case of a nuclear emergency. Even at a young age, he understood the futility of ducking and covering if a 15-megaton atom bomb dropped.

“It was scary for a seven-year-old kid,” he recalls. “I had nightmares about nuclear war really often.”

As an adult, Prokhorov converted that morbid fascination with nuclear fallout from a nightmare to creative inspiration. Leading teams of talented artists, programmers, and designers across two companies, he helped orchestrate three of the moodiest and most haunting post-apocalyptic interactive experiences in modern gaming.

Leaving The Rails

about X hours ago from
Leaving The Rails

Nuclear dread has always hung over Andriy Prokhorov’s head. Growing up in the Soviet Union in the 1970s, the Cold War loomed large. Each week during grade school, teachers walked students through civil defense lessons detailing what to do in the case of a nuclear emergency. Even at a young age, he understood the futility of ducking and covering if a 15-megaton atom bomb dropped.

“It was scary for a seven-year-old kid,” he recalls. “I had nightmares about nuclear war really often.”

As an adult, Prokhorov converted that morbid fascination with nuclear fallout from a nightmare to creative inspiration. Leading teams of talented artists, programmers, and designers across two companies, he helped orchestrate three of the moodiest and most haunting post-apocalyptic interactive experiences in modern gaming.