What Would The Absence Of Net Neutrality Look Like For The Games Industry?

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What Would The Absence Of Net Neutrality Look Like For The Games Industry?

Earlier this month, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in favor of repealing net neutrality regulations that were put in place during the Obama era. This left many concerned that we would no longer have a free and open internet in the near future – and it could have serious ramifications for games.

Net neutrality keeps the internet on an equal footing, prohibiting internet service providers (ISPs) from manipulating or discriminating content on the web. This means no preferential treatment is given to certain websites over others. Without net neutrality, secondary fees could come into play, particularly for online corporations like Netflix, and these fees could then trickle down to consumers. For example, ISPs could create a premium “fast lane” connection for specific sites and services, which could throttle traffic for those that don’t subscribe to it.

Top 10 Outrageous Microtransactions

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Top 10 Outrageous Microtransactions

Microtransactions: Publishers love them, gamers try their best to tolerate them. While many companies have found ways to introduce alternate revenue streams in their games without affecting gameplay, others have been more cavalier in their approach to microtransactions. Here are the 10 most outrageous implementations of microtransactions in video games.

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared in issue 297 of Game Informer magazine.

10. EverythingDungeon Keeper
EA took Dungeon Keeper’s premise of demonic minions hoarding gold a little too literally. The publisher filled its mobile remake with so many in-app purchases, time gates, and premium currencies that the British Advertising Standards Authority ruled they legally couldn’t call it “free-to-play.”

The Best Achievements And Trophies Of 2017

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 The Best Achievements And Trophies Of 2017

Whether you love them, hate them, or forget they exist until they pop on your screen and interrupt your game, achievements and trophies are (literally) a required feature of all PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Steam games. I fall into the love camp, and these are some of my favorites from 2017.

The achievements and trophies I find most interesting aren't the ones that mark your progress in a storyline or reward you for attaining a certain number of headshots. I like the ones that force you to think outside of the normal functions of the game or reward you for doing something weird.

Follow the links to see 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 , and 2016's best achievements and trophies.

Game Informer's Eighth Annual Glitchie Awards

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Game Informer's Eighth Annual Glitchie Awards

With rising budgets and team sizes, creating video games continues to get more expensive and difficult. Rarely does a game release without a significant day-one patch that features critical, last-second changes. But every once in a while, we encounter a glitch or bug that puts a smile instead of a scowl on our faces. We celebrate these hilarious, immersion-shattering mistakes each year with The Glitchies.

2017 had a abundance of hilarious glitches thanks to bug-heavy games like PUBG, Battlefront II, and Assassin's Creed Origins. As with every year, it's tough to beat the animation and physics fails from the EA Sports franchises, and this year Madden brought its A game. We found several other great bugs worth sharing as well. Enjoy!

Warning: Game Informer is not responsible for content on YouTube links. Language may be unsuitable for minors.

Does Paul McCartney Play Video Games?

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Does Paul McCartney Play Video Games?

Martin O’Donnell is known predominantly for his musical work on the Halo series. Today, he is working with Jaime Griesemer at Highwire Games (a studio the two co-founded) on a PlayStation VR title called Golem. Between those two projects, however, he worked on the music for Destiny and in the creation of that game’s music, he was able to work with Paul McCartney. While chatting with O’Donnel for a preview of Golem (which you can find in issue 297) we spoke briefly about working with the former Beatle, and his strained departure from Bungie.

Game Informer: You worked with Paul McCartney. Does he play video games?

O’Donnell: [Laughs] Yeah, he did actually, while we were working together. He played Halo. He played Halo with his kids and his grandkids. He said he wasn’t very good. He said he got killed all the time, and I said, “Yeah, join the club.” I doubt he’s hardcore, like play everything that comes out, but he was definitely interested in the medium and what it can do and what’s going on.

The Sports Desk – A New Skating Session Begins

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The Sports Desk – A New Skating Session Begins

Gamers have been begging EA to bring back the Skate franchise, and although there's been no word on whether that will ever happen or not, that doesn't mean we won't be getting a skating game at some point. Montreal-based Crea-ture Studios has kickstarted a PC/Xbox One (hopefully PS4 at some point) project called Session that not only looks to resurrect video game skateboarding, but do it in its only particular fashion.

The article below originally appeared in the January 2018 issue of Game Informer (#297), and since then Crea-ture has added reverts into the game, a vert ramp stretch goal and more. Check out the game's Kickstarter page to see the latest on Session.

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Mega Man 11 Lead Developers Pick Their Favorite Mega Men

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Mega Man 11 Lead Developers Pick Their Favorite Mega Men

Before working on Mega Man 11, the development team at Capcom played through the entire original Mega Man and Mega Man X series, so we decided to ask the leads which Mega Man game was their favorite. Here are the Mega Man games that specifically inspired the design of Mega Man 11.

Director Koji Oda (previously worked on Resident Evil 0, Strider, Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop)"I'd have to say Mega Man 1, because when I first tried it out there were a lot of things to be surprised about. The fact that you were able to choose which stage you wanted to try out first was great, and I loved all the different weapons that you get. But despite all the different weapons, the core gameplay was still intact. I felt like, every time you played it, you could discover something new. On top of that, you got a sense that you kept getting better the more you played. I thought that was really cool."

Producer Kazuhiro Tsuchiya (previously worked on Asura's Wrath, Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo, and Mega Man 7)
"It's a difficult question to answer, but if I had to pick one game it would be Mega Man 7, and the reason is because I was part of R&D. I was a programmer at the time, and I worked on all of the weapon bosses and some of the gimmicks [one-off sequences] from the stages, as well as all the programming for the character Bass."

Inside The Lives Of Families And Couples That Make Games Together

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Inside The Lives Of Families And Couples That Make Games Together

Building and sustaining a healthy relationship has its share of ups and downs, and mixing that with game development can be an even greater feat. Although the term “don’t mix business with pleasure” suggests relationships and work should remain sepa- rate, some couples in the games industry believe otherwise. From Perception’s developer duo running a studio from home while taking care of four kids, to the family trauma that drove That Dragon, Cancer’s creators to build an emotional game, it’s clear that for some, making games is best accomplished when it’s a two-way street.

This feature article originally appeared in issue #291 of Game Informer magazine.

Two Is Better Than One

Oh Goodness, It's More Gaming Haiku (Yet Again)

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Oh Goodness, It's More Gaming Haiku (Yet Again)

What a year, right? I'm going to try and create a temporary oasis from all of the horrors, disappointments, and overall awfulness that 2017 brought to bear on all of our lives. And what better way to do that than with poetry? And not just any poems – we're talking haiku, the Cadillac Coupe de Ville of written verse. I looked back at the past 10 games that I played and have immortalized my experiences through that classic form.

You know, it's basically that thing that I've done a few times before (herehereherehereherehere and here.). As always, you're welcome. And no, you're a slow news day.

PlayerUnknown's BattlegroundsStaring at a door
Waiting for him to enter
A Venus Guytrap