The Exciting Sights Of TGS 2017

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The Exciting Sights Of TGS 2017

Another Tokyo Game Show is in full swing, and every year we try to bring the experience to you. The event may not be the powerhouse it once was for reveals, but there's still plenty of enthusiasm in the air for all things video games. From amazing cosplayers to cool booth setups, we snapped shots of the show floor this year. We'll be updating this gallery through the weekend, so be sure to check back for more photos that capture the show's essence.

Cosplayers are all around to celebrate games. I snapped this by the Final Fantasy XIV booth. 

Evil Within 2, called Psycho Break 2 in Japan, received top billing and had a line to play it all day.

TGS Sidequest – The Persona 5 Exhibit In Akihabara

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TGS Sidequest – The Persona 5 Exhibit In Akihabara

Part of what I love about Japan is you know what you'll find. If you know me, you know I'm a figure collector and that a lot of my trips here are spent figure hunting. I happened to be out in Akihabara on a hunt today and came across a special Persona 5 exhibit in the Kotobukiya shop there. I knew what I had to do, take pictures for you all to see. Check out the shots below to relive your glory days with the Phantom Thieves. 

Here's a look at some authentic attire from the game. From Shujin Academy uniforms to Joker's getup in he wears in dungeons. The jacket costs 150,000 Yen (about $1350), btw.

Igor sits at his desk, deciding who to make his next pact with...

Five Niche Games From TGS 2017 To Watch

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Five Niche Games From TGS 2017 To Watch

I've spent the last few days trying to soak in as much as I can about TGS 2017. While games like Monster Hunter: World and The Evil Within 2 drew big lines, I wanted to focus on some smaller titles that you might not know about. Here are fix niche games that I found interesting from the show. 

Replay – Resident Evil 3: Nemesis

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Replay – Resident Evil 3: Nemesis

Welcome to another Replay Reunion episode! Tim Turi, Dan Ryckert, and Mike Mahardy join Andrew Reiner for a look back at Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, a sequel that injected an unstoppable threat into Capcom's tried-and-true survival horror formula. We discuss the current state of the Resident Evil series as Tim Turi skillfully works his way through Raccoon City's zombified streets.

We also compete against one another in a PlayStation launch title that hasn't aged so well, but clearly shows why gamers were flocking toward this generation of games for new experiences.

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We Get Up-Close With The SNES Classic Edition

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We Get Up-Close With The SNES Classic Edition

The SNES Classic Edition comes out on September 29, but Nintendo sent us the system a week early. Our immediate future involves spending a lot of time with the library of classic 16-bit games, and we should have some impressions to share next week. In the meantime, check out this gallery of pictures we took of the unit itself, including a controller-cord length comparison. 

Once you get everything unwrapped and set out in front of you, the SNES Classic Edition is going to look a little something like this. 

If you are very tall and looking down on the unit and its array of accessories, it will look like this instead.

Top Of The Table – The Best Time Travel Games

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Top Of The Table – The Best Time Travel Games

Time travel tales delight us for a reason; it’s exciting to consider the ways history could be different, or imagine the ways that the ability to leap back or forward in time might work. As a game design concept, time travel is a big challenge. How do you reflect the paradoxes and problems of time travel within a design framework? 

Several games over the years have tackled the concept, but here are five of my favorites, each of which uses time in an intriguing way, and leads to great times with friends and family around the table.

12 Ways To Improve Destiny 2’s Collection Experience

about X hours ago from
12 Ways To Improve Destiny 2’s Collection Experience

Destiny 2 is a rich and massive game, filled with opportunities for adventure, cooperation, and competition. I had high praise to speak of the game in my review, but I wanted to drill down into one particular criticism of the new game that I brought up in that article; Destiny 2’s inventory management and vault system continues to be a problem, and I’d love to see Bungie focus some attention on the issue. In some instances, inventory management seems to have taken a step back since the first Destiny. In a broader sense, Destiny 2 is missing out on opportunities to make its collection experience more engaging and fun in the long term.

I’m not privy to the memory needs and other technical limitations of a game like Destiny 2, and it’s easy to point to seemingly simple solutions without acknowledging the way that changing one system could drastically affect other in-game systems. Nonetheless, as a dedicated player of the game, and echoing numerous complaints I’ve already heard from players who I join on a nightly basis, it’s worth considering at least some of these ways that the collecting and keeping of items and info in-game could be improved. 

The Unchained Chaos Of Middle-earth: Shadow Of War

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The Unchained Chaos Of Middle-earth: Shadow Of War

The Nemesis system was instrumental in providing a unique experience in Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor. The ability to build antagonistic bonds with enemies over the course of a playthrough, all while seeing them rewarded for killing you, delivered surprises and thrills on a regular basis. The upgraded Nemesis system in Middle-earth: Shadow of War hopes to offer even more exciting and memorable moments by not only implementing more variables into the equation, but also embracing the chaos. It does so by giving you fortress assaults that apply so many elements simultaneously that they're practically begging disorder to descend upon the player. I recently had a chance to witness the chaos firsthand during a hands-on session with the game.

As I approach the fortress in Gorgoroth, the magma-filled region of Mordor, I feel confident in my chances of success. I've done my homework in building up my army; I've established a strong front of orc allies to battle by my side as we storm the fortress, but I've also installed four spies within the walls of the fort to launch an unexpected attack from behind the enemy's back once the siege commences.

See How Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga Compares To Its Upcoming Remake

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See How Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga Compares To Its Upcoming Remake

Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga released on the Game Boy Advance in 2003. Next month, a remake of the game releases for 3DS so we decided to compare the two versions of the game directly.

With nearly 15 years separating the two games, how do they compare? Also, when everyone was losing their mind over Mario without his shirt on, why didn't anyone point out that he's wearing nothing but a towel in the opening moments of Mario & Luigi?

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The History Of Pokémon Gold And Silver

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The History Of Pokémon Gold And Silver

Earlier this year, we traveled to Japan to visit Game Freak and learn all about the history of Pokémon. The result was a large feature all about the franchise that you can read in the September issue of Game Informer magazine, the one with Call of Duty WWII on the cover. Today, Pokémon Gold and Silver released on the 3DS Virtual Console, so we decided to post an excerpt from that feature covering those games.

Despite the massive success of Pokémon Red and Green (and Blue), Game Freak struggled with the development of Gold and Silver. The studio was feeling the effects of a six-year development cycle.

“After Red and Green came out, and the follow-up games, we didn’t have a lot of money. We were kind of out of money at that point because we had spent all the development funds and everything, so we needed to make some other games to stay in business,” Masuda says. Masuda worked as a programmer on a game that never released in America called Bazaar de Gosāru no Game de Gosāru at the same time he composed music for Gold and Silver.