Exploring The Directions Rockstar Could Go With Red Dead Redemption II Story DLC

about X hours ago from
Exploring The Directions Rockstar Could Go With Red Dead Redemption II Story DLC

After Grand Theft Auto V came and went with no further story missions to enjoy outside of the main campaign, many have assumed Rockstar will take the same approach with Red Dead Redemption II and pour all its resources into the Red Dead Online service that starts later this month. Well, hold your horses just a sec.

When I interviewed Rockstar director of design Imran Sarwar last year, he didn’t rule out story DLC for future games, saying, “We would love to do more single-player add-ons for games in the future. As a company, we love single-player more than anything, and believe in it absolutely – for storytelling and a sense of immersion in a world, multiplayer games don’t rival single-player games.”

Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

about X hours ago from
Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

Blizzard co-founder Allen Adham came back to the company two-and-a-half years ago after being gone a little over a decade. Today, Adham talks why he left, why he came back, and what to expect in the future from one of the industry's most revered companies.

So, what brought you back? So, I’ll tell you the short version of the story. So, I ran the company for like the first 13 years as president and then later as chairman and VP of Game Design. And I left amid 2004, right before World of Warcraft launched. And I had been, along with Mike [Morhaime] running the company and game director of World of Warcraft up until that point. And so, we didn’t call it game director back then – there was no game director title – it was lead game designer. And so, I exhausted myself working seven day weeks, 14-16 hour days, for more than a year, and I loved it, but it turns out making an MMO and running Blizzard was two jobs in one.

Sure.
What I should have done was taken a sabbatical. Refresh. And then come back. But what I did, instead, was I went off and started a quantitative hedge fund using computers and artificial intelligence, trading the stock market. And that was super fun too. Another really fun video game in a different sort of setting...

Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

about X hours ago from
Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

Blizzard co-founder Allen Adham came back to the company two-and-a-half years ago after being gone a little over a decade. Today, Adham talks why he left, why he came back, and what to expect in the future from one of the industry's most revered companies.

So, what brought you back? So, I’ll tell you the short version of the story. So, I ran the company for like the first 13 years as president and then later as chairman and VP of Game Design. And I left amid 2004, right before World of Warcraft launched. And I had been, along with Mike [Morhaime] running the company and game director of World of Warcraft up until that point. And so, we didn’t call it game director back then – there was no game director title – it was lead game designer. And so, I exhausted myself working seven day weeks, 14-16 hour days, for more than a year, and I loved it, but it turns out making an MMO and running Blizzard was two jobs in one.

Sure.
What I should have done was taken a sabbatical. Refresh. And then come back. But what I did, instead, was I went off and started a quantitative hedge fund using computers and artificial intelligence, trading the stock market. And that was super fun too. Another really fun video game in a different sort of setting...

Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

about X hours ago from
Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

Blizzard co-founder Allen Adham came back to the company two-and-a-half years ago after being gone a little over a decade. Today, Adham talks why he left, why he came back, and what to expect in the future from one of the industry's most revered companies.

So, what brought you back? So, I’ll tell you the short version of the story. So, I ran the company for like the first 13 years as president and then later as chairman and VP of Game Design. And I left amid 2004, right before World of Warcraft launched. And I had been, along with Mike [Morhaime] running the company and game director of World of Warcraft up until that point. And so, we didn’t call it game director back then – there was no game director title – it was lead game designer. And so, I exhausted myself working seven day weeks, 14-16 hour days, for more than a year, and I loved it, but it turns out making an MMO and running Blizzard was two jobs in one.

Sure.
What I should have done was taken a sabbatical. Refresh. And then come back. But what I did, instead, was I went off and started a quantitative hedge fund using computers and artificial intelligence, trading the stock market. And that was super fun too. Another really fun video game in a different sort of setting...

Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

about X hours ago from
Our Full BlizzCon Interview With Blizzard Co-Founder Allen Adham

Blizzard co-founder Allen Adham came back to the company two-and-a-half years ago after being gone a little over a decade. Today, Adham talks why he left, why he came back, and what to expect in the future from one of the industry's most revered companies.

So, what brought you back? So, I’ll tell you the short version of the story. So, I ran the company for like the first 13 years as president and then later as chairman and VP of Game Design. And I left amid 2004, right before World of Warcraft launched. And I had been, along with Mike [Morhaime] running the company and game director of World of Warcraft up until that point. And so, we didn’t call it game director back then – there was no game director title – it was lead game designer. And so, I exhausted myself working seven day weeks, 14-16 hour days, for more than a year, and I loved it, but it turns out making an MMO and running Blizzard was two jobs in one.

Sure.
What I should have done was taken a sabbatical. Refresh. And then come back. But what I did, instead, was I went off and started a quantitative hedge fund using computers and artificial intelligence, trading the stock market. And that was super fun too. Another really fun video game in a different sort of setting...

Exploring The Directions Rockstar Could Go With Red Dead Redemption II Story DLC

about X hours ago from
Exploring The Directions Rockstar Could Go With Red Dead Redemption II Story DLC

After Grand Theft Auto V came and went with no further story missions to enjoy outside of the main campaign, many have assumed Rockstar will take the same approach with Red Dead Redemption II and pour all its resources into the Red Dead Online service that starts later this month. Well, hold your horses just a sec.

When I interviewed Rockstar director of design Imran Sarwar last year, he didn’t rule out story DLC for future games, saying, “We would love to do more single-player add-ons for games in the future. As a company, we love single-player more than anything, and believe in it absolutely – for storytelling and a sense of immersion in a world, multiplayer games don’t rival single-player games.”

Hands-On With The PlayStation Classic

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With The PlayStation Classic

When the PlayStation released in 1995, the system represented a sea change in video games in everything from the way games were made to how they were marketed. The PlayStation brand represented game design without limits; a chance to reach into the game world and pull out the sparks of a revolution in gaming. Twenty years later, Sony is hoping to revitalize that nostalgia with its own take on a miniconsole, the PlayStation Classic, a tiny replica of the 1995 original pre-loaded with games from the console’s library. We got to go hands-on with the system for the first time ahead of its December release and test drive its set of chosen games.

Similar to other minconsoles like Nintendo’s own NES and SNES Classics, the actual design of the system hews as close as possible to the original console, complete with the same functional Power, Reset, and Tray Open buttons. Power turns the system on and off, while Reset is the only way to get you back to the home menu to select from the game library. While the Tray Open button doesn’t actually open the tray, as the molded plastic simply doesn’t have an opening there, it does change virtual discs when the game prompts you to do so. For the vast majority of games this won’t matter, but certain titles like Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid required the player to swap out the discs, so this is the system’s way to handle that.

Hands-On With The PlayStation Classic

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With The PlayStation Classic

When the PlayStation released in 1995, the system represented a sea change in video games in everything from the way games were made to how they were marketed. The PlayStation brand represented game design without limits; a chance to reach into the game world and pull out the sparks of a revolution in gaming. Twenty years later, Sony is hoping to revitalize that nostalgia with its own take on a miniconsole, the PlayStation Classic, a tiny replica of the 1995 original pre-loaded with games from the console’s library. We got to go hands-on with the system for the first time ahead of its December release and test drive its set of chosen games.

Similar to other minconsoles like Nintendo’s own NES and SNES Classics, the actual design of the system hews as close as possible to the original console, complete with the same functional Power, Reset, and Tray Open buttons. Power turns the system on and off, while Reset is the only way to get you back to the home menu to select from the game library. While the Tray Open button doesn’t actually open the tray, as the molded plastic simply doesn’t have an opening there, it does change virtual discs when the game prompts you to do so. For the vast majority of games this won’t matter, but certain titles like Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid required the player to swap out the discs, so this is the system’s way to handle that.

Watch 30 Hours Of Red Dead Redemption II In One Spoiler-free 3.5 Minute Highlight Reel

about X hours ago from
Watch 30 Hours Of Red Dead Redemption II In One Spoiler-free 3.5 Minute Highlight Reel

Red Dead Redemption II has been out for almost two weeks and though I have yet to see the game's credits, I have spent a lot of time with it getting into all kinds of shenanigans in and outside of the mainline story. As I have been doing that, I have been capturing the more interesting bits as they occur in order to collect them here. You won't find and main story spoilers, but you will see my crashes, the odd side story moment, and a handful of strange bugs,.

For more on Red Dead Redemption II, you can head here for our review, and here for our Sick Stunts video we created for the game.

Watch 30 Hours Of Red Dead Redemption II In One Spoiler-free 3.5 Minute Highlight Reel

about X hours ago from
Watch 30 Hours Of Red Dead Redemption II In One Spoiler-free 3.5 Minute Highlight Reel

Red Dead Redemption II has been out for almost two weeks and though I have yet to see the game's credits, I have spent a lot of time with it getting into all kinds of shenanigans in and outside of the mainline story. As I have been doing that, I have been capturing the more interesting bits as they occur in order to collect them here. You won't find and main story spoilers, but you will see my crashes, the odd side story moment, and a handful of strange bugs,.

For more on Red Dead Redemption II, you can head here for our review, and here for our Sick Stunts video we created for the game.