Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

about X hours ago from
Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

This article was originally published in issue 307 of Game Informer magazine.

Daigo Umehara isn’t sure he recalls the moment that made him famous. “I don’t even know if I remember it, or I know it because I’ve seen the video so many times,” he tells me.

In that video, Umehara is up against Justin Wong at the 2004 Evolution Championship Series (Evo) tournament for Street Fighter III: Third Strike. Umehara, with only a sliver of health left on his Ken, jockeys for position with Wong’s Chun-Li, who refuses to attack. Why would she? All Wong has to do is let the clock run out.

Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

about X hours ago from
Why Street Fighter's Greatest Legend Isn't Going Down Without A Fight

This article was originally published in issue 307 of Game Informer magazine.

Daigo Umehara isn’t sure he recalls the moment that made him famous. “I don’t even know if I remember it, or I know it because I’ve seen the video so many times,” he tells me.

In that video, Umehara is up against Justin Wong at the 2004 Evolution Championship Series (Evo) tournament for Street Fighter III: Third Strike. Umehara, with only a sliver of health left on his Ken, jockeys for position with Wong’s Chun-Li, who refuses to attack. Why would she? All Wong has to do is let the clock run out.

What's The First Game You'll Play In 2019?

about X hours ago from
What's The First Game You'll Play In 2019?

It's that time, folks. 2018 has been booted out the door and we're heading full-tilt boogie into the year two thousand and nineteen.

I'm sure many of you have started playing some games you've purchased or received over the holidays, so the big question is this: which game is kicking off the year for you? For me, I'm playing through the gorgeous Gris, frustrated that I put it off too long for it to make my top 10.

What about you, readers? Who's taking a ride into the Wild West for the first time? Or maybe you're checking out some gem you grabbed in a sale. Let us know below!

What's The First Game You'll Play In 2019?

about X hours ago from
What's The First Game You'll Play In 2019?

It's that time, folks. 2018 has been booted out the door and we're heading full-tilt boogie into the year two thousand and nineteen.

I'm sure many of you have started playing some games you've purchased or received over the holidays, so the big question is this: which game is kicking off the year for you? For me, I'm playing through the gorgeous GRIS, frustrated that I put it off too long for it to make my top 10.

What about you, readers? Who's taking a ride into the Wild West for the first time? Or maybe you're checking out some gem you grabbed in a sale. Let us know below!

Woah There: Embracing Slow Travel In Red Dead Redemption II

about X hours ago from
Woah There: Embracing Slow Travel In Red Dead Redemption II

If I had access to a teleporter, I’d abuse the hell out of it. I don’t like driving to work all that much, even though the commute does allow me to keep up-to-date on most of my favorite podcasts. Imagine all the time I’d save on snow days, where everyone suddenly forgets how to drive completely and traffic freezes to a standstill. Heading to Target to pick up a single item wouldn’t seem like such a hassle, either. I’m probably not going to get that kind of magical device anytime soon, but I do get to indulge in that kind of fantasy in open-world games. Whenever fast travel is available, it almost always becomes my preferred way of getting around. At least it was until I played Red Dead Redemption II.

Woah There: Embracing Slow Travel In Red Dead Redemption II

about X hours ago from
Woah There: Embracing Slow Travel In Red Dead Redemption II

If I had access to a teleporter, I’d abuse the hell out of it. I don’t like driving to work all that much, even though the commute does allow me to keep up-to-date on most of my favorite podcasts. Imagine all the time I’d save on snow days, where everyone suddenly forgets how to drive completely and traffic freezes to a standstill. Heading to Target to pick up a single item wouldn’t seem like such a hassle, either. I’m probably not going to get that kind of magical device anytime soon, but I do get to indulge in that kind of fantasy in open-world games. Whenever fast travel is available, it almost always becomes my preferred way of getting around. At least it was until I played Red Dead Redemption II.

Talking To Yoko Taro, PlatinumGames' Takahisa Taura, And Composer Keiichi Okabe About Life, Death, And Opportunity

about X hours ago from
Talking To Yoko Taro, PlatinumGames' Takahisa Taura, And Composer Keiichi Okabe About Life, Death, And Opportunity

This interview with Nier: Automata director Yoko Taro and PlatinumGames' designer Takahisa Taura was first conducted in March of this year. Square Enix then offered us another chance to talk with Taro again, this time with Keiichi Okabe to speak more about the game's creation, music, and design philosophies and we are taking this opportunity to combine both until-now unpublished interviews together. 

At the start of the first interview, Taro Yoko, whose pen name is appropriately Yoko Taro, was surprisingly quiet. He took a gulp from a bottle of Diet Pepsi and looked me straight in the eye to say something. I myself looked to the translator, who laughed at whatever Yoko said. She began "Yoko-san wants you to write about how expensive the food and drinks are here, if you can. He says it's way too much."

[The following interview contains some spoilers for Nier: Automata, including the game's final ending.]

Talking To Yoko Taro, PlatinumGames' Takahisa Taura, And Composer Keiichi Okabe About Life, Death, And Opportunity

about X hours ago from
Talking To Yoko Taro, PlatinumGames' Takahisa Taura, And Composer Keiichi Okabe About Life, Death, And Opportunity

This interview with Nier: Automata director Yoko Taro and PlatinumGames' designer Takahisa Taura was first conducted in March of this year. Square Enix then offered us another chance to talk with Taro again, this time with Keiichi Okabe to speak more about the game's creation, music, and design philosophies and we are taking this opportunity to combine both until-now unpublished interviews together. 

At the start of the first interview, Taro Yoko, whose pen name is appropriately Yoko Taro, was surprisingly quiet. He took a gulp from a bottle of Diet Pepsi and looked me straight in the eye to say something. I myself looked to the translator, who laughed at whatever Yoko said. She began "Yoko-san wants you to write about how expensive the food and drinks are here, if you can. He says it's way too much."

[The following interview contains some spoilers for Nier: Automata, including the game's final ending.]

How Do The Assassin’s Creed Wines Taste?

about X hours ago from
How Do The Assassin’s Creed Wines Taste?

Back in November, Ubisoft and winemaker Lot18 announced a partnership to release some wine themed after the Assassin’s Creed franchise. Anyone can throw a label on a bottle, but do these wines capture the essence of the subject matter and live up to the Assassin’s Creed name? I’m not a sommelier, but I have played a lot of the Assassin’s Creed series, so I decided that it is my duty to sample these six wines and see how they measure up to my assumptions.

Below you’ll find my expert predictions for how each wine will taste, informed by over a decade of experience with these characters and their adventures. Then you’ll find my inexpert taste assessment, informed by the fact that I like drinking wine sometimes.

Expert prediction: I think this will be a wine that comes across strong at first, but after many repetitive sips, the flavor could grow dull over time. Following in the footsteps of the original Assassin’s Creed, it may not have the variety to become a timeless vintage, yet I expect something exciting here that will set the tone for all of the wines further down its family tree.

How Do The Assassin’s Creed Wines Taste?

about X hours ago from
How Do The Assassin’s Creed Wines Taste?

Back in November, Ubisoft and winemaker Lot18 announced a partnership to release some wine themed after the Assassin’s Creed franchise. Anyone can throw a label on a bottle, but do these wines capture the essence of the subject matter and live up to the Assassin’s Creed name? I’m not a sommelier, but I have played a lot of the Assassin’s Creed series, so I decided that it is my duty to sample these six wines and see how they measure up to my assumptions.

Below you’ll find my expert predictions for how each wine will taste, informed by over a decade of experience with these characters and their adventures. Then you’ll find my inexpert taste assessment, informed by the fact that I like drinking wine sometimes.

Expert prediction: I think this will be a wine that comes across strong at first, but after many repetitive sips, the flavor could grow dull over time. Following in the footsteps of the original Assassin’s Creed, it may not have the variety to become a timeless vintage, yet I expect something exciting here that will set the tone for all of the wines further down its family tree.