The Sports Desk – The Disappearance Of Splitscreen Racing

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The Sports Desk – The Disappearance Of Splitscreen Racing

Richard Petty is quoted as saying, "There is no doubt about precisely when folks began racing each other in automobiles. It was the day they built the second automobile." Yes, racing is in our blood, which is why all racing games need some kind of multiplayer component. These days that means online racing, although there are still lots of people who love to trade paint racing with the person physically next to them as well as up on the TV screen. However, local, offline splitscreen multiplayer remains an infrequent feature of racing games. In this edition of the Sports Desk I talked to some racing developers to find out why this is and if we can hope to see the feature in more racing titles.

The Cost of Development

The main reason splitscreen racing isn't in more racing titles according to the developers I talked to is that it takes a lot of time and resources to implement. It's not just a case of two cars up on screen – it's doubling everything. "It's a pretty high load," says Rich Garcia, president of Monster Games (NASCAR Heat Evolution), "because it's not just the cars, it's the particle effects or anything that's going on." For example, he mentions the game having to be ready to load two different victory sequences depending on who wins.

Persona 5's 10 Funniest Meme Videos

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Persona 5's 10 Funniest Meme Videos

Persona 5 is a great game thanks to its fantastic story and entertaining loop of dungeon crawling and social simulation. It's also one of the most stylish games in years, and a lot folks are having fun with that, mixing 5's battle theme, "The Last Surprise" as well as the game's beautiful UI into various video clips.

Here are the funniest ones for you to enjoy.

Apparently all you need to make Spider-Man 3 a decent movie is a smidge of Persona.

How A Fighting Game Documentary Survived 9/11 And Became A Cult Favorite

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How A Fighting Game Documentary Survived 9/11 And Became A Cult Favorite

On the day Peter Kang’s years-long passion project went up in flames, it wasn’t his biggest concern. Two commercial airliners had just collided with the World Trade Center in New York, and while the morning news was inundated with coverage of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Kang didn’t need to watch. “I looked out the window, and of course the north tower’s on fire from the first crash,” Kang says. As he was escorted out of Battery Park to safety by the NYPD, the Street Fighter documentary he’d been editing was the last thing on his mind.

But since then, Kang’s been thinking about it a lot. After turning what little footage he had left into the award-winning film Bang the Machine, he’s been on a 15-year, on-and-off journey to have it see the light of day. The road has been rough and Kang still hasn’t defeated the film’s toughest opponent, but as in the scene he documented at the turn of the millennium, victory is always within reach.

Afterwords – Horizon Zero Dawn

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Afterwords – Horizon Zero Dawn

For years, Guerrilla Games has been synonymous with its sci-fi FPS series, Killzone. However, the studio's decision to change gears – and genres – for Horizon Zero Dawn has already proven an astounding success, selling over 2.6 million copies in less than a month. We recently spoke to the team about Horizon's intriguing world, characters, and gameplay, what the future holds for the fledgling series.

What was the most difficult aspect about transitioning from first-person shooters to a huge open-world RPG?Hermen Hulst, managing director: This project was out of our comfort zone on so many levels. Even aspects that we felt were relatively "safe," such as our goal to preserve the intense and tactical style of combat that we were accustomed to from the Killzone series, proved much more difficult to achieve in an open world. We quickly found that the designers for these combat encounters had far less control over the position of the player character and the enemy characters than they would have in a linear setting. And other project goals were just as daunting. For example, we wanted to have a level of visual detail in Horizon's open world that was similar to or greater than what we were used to from our Killzone games; you can imagine the hurdles our tech and tools teams had to take to achieve this.

How Super Smash Bros. Melee Has Stood The Test Of Time

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How Super Smash Bros. Melee Has Stood The Test Of Time

No other game in the fighting-game community has managed to stay relevant for as long as Super Smash Bros. Melee. With a 16-year lifespan and a community that puts it above all else, Super Smash Bros. Melee continues to evolve without ever receiving a single patch. A closer look at the community reveals what sets it apart from other fighting games. The incredible depth of Melee, combined with the undying love of a dedicated fanbase has forged the game into a powerhouse that continues to thrive while other games dwindle and die.

“The Greatest Game Ever Created”Christopher “Wife” Fabiszak, is veteran Melee player and commentator who understands Melee’s complexities. When he calls Melee “the greatest game ever created,” he’s not just talking about how fun it is in comparison to other games, but how deep the gameplay goes. 

“Smash is a sandbox fighter,” says Fabiszak. “The nearly infinite range of movement allows for creativity and expression like no other game.”

Highlighting History's First Female Game Designers

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Highlighting History's First Female Game Designers

Video games have come a long way in the industry’s short history. Besides evolving from Pong and Space Invaders to Breath of the Wild and Halo, the industry itself has grown in other ways. Prominent figures such as Siobhan Reddy, co-founder of the studio behind LittleBigPlanet who was named one of the UK’s 100 most powerful women, have brought greater visibility to women working in the gaming industry. Though it might be difficult today to imagine Uncharted without Amy Hennig or Journey without Robin Hunicke, women in the early days of video games rarely had their time in the limelight. Carol Shaw and Dona Bailey, creators of River Raid and Centipede respectively, were two of the first female game designers in video game history, yet their contributions have often been overlooked… Until now. 

UFC Champ Demetrious Johnson Talks His Other Career: Streaming Games On Twitch

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UFC Champ Demetrious Johnson Talks His Other Career: Streaming Games On Twitch

When the UFC expanded to include a men's flyweight division in 2012, Demetrious Johnson emerged as its first champion. Fast forward five years and "Mighty Mouse" still dons the championship belt. He has not only consistently been the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world, but Johnson has been so dominant that the UFC's reality show, The Ultimate Fighter, dedicated one of its 2016 seasons to finding someone to beat him – a fight that Johnson also won. Despite having his eye on the record for most title defenses in UFC history – an honor currently held by the legendary Anderson Silva – Johnson has dedicated himself to growing his audience streaming video games on Twitch.

This article was originally published in issue 289 of Game Informer

Johnson is a lifelong gamer, which explains why an elite athlete in one of the world's biggest sports organizations is passionate about streaming video games. The 30-year-old fondly recalls his first game of Super Contra on NES, which he played with his mom.

Replay – Excalibur 2555 AD

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Replay – Excalibur 2555 AD

This week on Replay we take a look at Excalibur 2555 AD, a game none of us had heard of until Andrew Reiner arbitrarily grabbed it from the vault.

The game stars Merlin's niece, who travels to a future where a meteor has forced humanity to live in a series of underground tunnels and cities. She has to retrieve Excalibur, which was stolen from King Arthur by time-travelers of the era. It's all very needlessly complicated and difficult to play.

Andrew Reiner, Dan Tack, Brian Shea, and I are all both horrified and enamored with the strange world of Excalibur 2555 AD and even use some codes to see what exists beyond the first level.

How To Create A Nearly Invincible Killing Machine In Persona 5

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How To Create A Nearly Invincible Killing Machine In Persona 5

One of the most fun parts of Persona 5 is the fusion system. You enlist a variety of demonic allies, then mix them together to create even more powerful personas to use in combat. For the sake of balance, most of these creatures have strengths and weaknesses – but what if you’d rather be ridiculously overpowered? There is a way to minimize your vulnerability by creating a persona that only takes damage from an extremely narrow selection of sources – and who has a devastating physical attack.

[Note: This feature contains no story spoilers, but it does reveal the names of a handful of late-game personas.]

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