Funny To A Point – The First Annual Not 50 Awards

about X hours ago from
Funny To A Point – The First Annual Not 50 Awards

2018 is just around the corner, which means we here at G.I. have one last editorial task to complete: arguing endlessly about best and worst games of the year, and then compiling the eventual surviving titles into our annual Top 50 list. However, just like with E3, there's one glaring flaw in our award-picking process: Everyone's stupid opinions always get in the way of us picking the correct winners!

Seeing as how finalizing our year-end awards is the only thing standing between us and holiday break, I have devised a brilliant, two-birds-with-one-stone solution: I'll simply disavow the Top 50 altogether and launch my own competing awards list, and I'll post it right now so that I can go home and start binge-gaming and eating Christmas lasagna* immediately.

With that I present to you the first annual Not 50 Awards, which admittedly would've been a better alternative title for the E3 Hot 50 awards, but I already called those the Dubys. Regardless, like the Dubys, the Not 50 Awards blows all the other year-end lists out of the water because not only are all the winners hand-picked by me, but all the categories are as well. The title is also 100-percent accurate, because there aren't 50 of them. Anywho, let's begin!

From Resident Evil To Strider: Koji Oda's 25 Year Journey To Directing Mega Man

about X hours ago from
From Resident Evil To Strider: Koji Oda's 25 Year Journey To Directing Mega Man

Since Keiji Inafune left Capcom back in 2010, Mega Man has been without a brand leader. Fortunately, game designer Koji Oda has stepped up to the plate to bring Mega Man into the modern era. Mega Man 11 hopes to appeal to long-time fans as well as newcomers, but who is the man leading this charge? Koji Oda has been with Capcom for over 25 years, so we sat down with the designer to get a better understanding of his gameography and how his previous experience is informing the development of Mega Man 11.

Koji Oda grew up on Capcom games. As a young student in the 1980s, Oda would frequently sneak out to the arcades. Whenever he could scrounge up enough money, he would buy games for his NES. Unfortunately, gaming magazines were scarce and the internet was primordial, so gamers rarely knew if a game was going to be good before they bought it. Oda felt like half the games he purchased turned out to be duds.

“Sometimes you would buy a game and it would be a ‘kusoge,’ which literally translates into sh---y game,” Oda says. “But then there was Capcom, which always had the Capcom logo on it. Those games were always promising. There were no ‘kusoge’ coming out of Capcom. That was the main reason I decided to apply to work here. I figured that if a company was able to make games that were this fun, it had to be fun to work there.”

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (December 21, 2017)

about X hours ago from
Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (December 21, 2017)

We're back again with plenty of great blogs! Next week we will be on hiatus again, but we hope that gives us and you plenty of time to enjoy the holidays!

Community Blogs For December 14 – December 20:

My Nine Favorite Games I Played at PSX 2017 Justin Mikos gives us a play-by-play of the games he played while at the PlayStation Experience. I kind of forgot about Guacamelee!, and oddly enough, started replaying it this week, so was excited to read about it here. However, I am a little nervous based on what Mikos wrote about the more frantic elements meant to accommodate four players. And Wattam looks pleasantly insane.

The Virtual Life – 2017's Best Games Were About Resistance

about X hours ago from
The Virtual Life – 2017's Best Games Were About Resistance

2017 has been a long year. The longest in my life, it's felt like. I've woken up a lot of mornings, made coffee, and then read one headline after another, each leaving their dizzying, devastating impact. Possible war on the horizon. Discrimination in spades. The continued downplay of the dangers of climate change. The death of one of my heroes. A bevy of personal, medical, and emotional issues haven't exactly made things bright and sparkly. If I were superstitious, I'd tell you there's something wrong with this year. That it's cursed, rancid. A year of anger and distrust and fear.

Capcom Helps Us Design Mega Man's Worst Robot Master

about X hours ago from
Capcom Helps Us Design Mega Man's Worst Robot Master

With our January cover story on Mega Man 11, we offer insight into how a small team within Capcom resurrected the Mega Man franchise and we share exclusive impressions of what it's like to play the game. With this feature, we show the new development team in action ... sort of. Game Informer's Ben Reeves grabs a whiteboard and walks through the process of designing a new boss for Mega Man with Mega Man 11's director Koji Oda, producer Kazuhiro Tsuchiya, and art director Yuji Ishihara. We should stress, there's not way this creation is making it into the game. If you want to learn more about the real Robot Masters in Mega Man 11, check out our feature where we share all we know.

Watch the video below to watch Ben Reeves live out his childhood dream of creating a new (and unusable) Robot Master for Mega Man.

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Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (December 21, 2017)

about X hours ago from
Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (December 21, 2017)

We're back again with plenty of great blogs! Next week we will be on hiatus again, but we hope that gives us and you plenty of time to enjoy the holidays!

Community Blogs For December 14 – December 20:

My Nine Favorite Games I Played at PSX 2017 Justin Mikos gives us a play-by-play of the games he played while at the PlayStation Experience. I kind of forgot about Guacamelee!, and oddly enough, started replaying it this week, so was excited to read about it here. However, I am a little nervous based on what Mikos wrote about the more frantic elements meant to accommodate four players. And Wattam looks pleasantly insane.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars: The Last Jedi Review

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars: The Last Jedi Review

I was in the hospital waiting for my daughter to be born when a bombshell of news hit: Disney had just purchased Lucasfilm for $4 billion, and the Star Wars saga would continue with Episode VII in a few years.
My mind was already a mess, hoping everything would go as planned for my wife and daughter, but now I had strong Star Wars thoughts creeping in. I was throttled by a chaotic symphony of emotions: “Oh god. I don’t know how to be a father. Luke Skywalker is probably coming back! My wife is amazing. I need to tell her that. Will Chewbacca's hair be grey?”

I told my wife that the universe was a cruel place, and I may be a weirdo for the next couple of hours due to Star Wars. She was quick to state that she didn’t want to hear it. Roughly 15 minutes later, she entered the final stages of labor, and our daughter was born two hours after that. I somewhat jokingly told her we should name her Leia, given the news that hit, and she debated murdering me.

In those moments of becoming a father, the Star Wars thought that I didn’t let go of was, "Will I see Luke Skywalker again?" He was there through most of my childhood, and I realized he may be for my daughter's too. I believed he would be the focus of the next film.

Meet The Team Who's Helping Indie Games Make It To Japan

about X hours ago from
Meet The Team Who's Helping Indie Games Make It To Japan

For many indie developers, bringing their game to Japan presents several new headaches and challenges. Dangen wants to change that.

Launched in April and comprised of industry veterans with years of experience across marketing, translation, and game publishing, Dangen Entertainment was created with the intent to aid indie developers looking to expand their games’ audiences with a Japanese release. While there are micropublishers available in Japan to make this possible, it is often difficult and costly to find one willing to take a chance on new or unproven titles. 

Even when an indie title is accepted, how the game is marketed by these micropublishers can be its own gamble. Some smaller titles are released with little to no marketing, crippling potential sales.

Meet The Team That's Bringing Indie Games To Japan

about X hours ago from
Meet The Team That's Bringing Indie Games To Japan

For many indie developers, bringing their game to Japan presents several new headaches and challenges. Dangen wants to change that.

Launched in April and comprised of industry veterans with years of experience across marketing, translation, and game publishing, Dangen Entertainment was created with the intent to aid indie developers looking to expand their games’ audiences with a Japanese release. While there are micropublishers available in Japan to make this possible, it is often difficult and costly to find one willing to take a chance on new or unproven titles. 

Even when an indie title is accepted, how the game is marketed by these micropublishers can be its own gamble. Some smaller titles are released with little to no marketing, crippling potential sales.

The Sports Desk – The State Of Sports Games

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – The State Of Sports Games

Once again it's a special edition of The Sports Desk, featuring Matt Bertz and myself chatting about the year that was in sports video games as well as what's coming. We also cover hot topics like microtransactions and the current lull in GM/Franchise modes that plague many of this year's editions. Where's Kim? Alas, she couldn't make it!

Enjoy, and thanks for stopping by all year! Please do so again.

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