How To Fix Overwatch's Four Broken Heroes

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How To Fix Overwatch's Four Broken Heroes

Overwatch has had an abundance of updates since its 2016 release, with Blizzard continuously reworking the roster to allow for more optimal combat experiences. While some noteworthy patches have completely reinvented character roles, smaller ones have altered cooldown timers or bullet spreads. These frequent modifications often tip the scales of gameplay balance. Some heroes have become devastatingly strong (Hanzo and his lethal arrow volleys), while others lose their value (Brigitte’s shield bash debuff). Here are four heroes currently in need of serious repair: 

The Flaws: At one point, Mercy’s selection rate soared above her support comrades, because she was such a capable healer. Supports, like Lucio and Zenyatta, were limited to specific stratagems. Others, notably Ana, were too mechanically demanding to use efficiently. Comparably, Mercy’s ability-kit was easy to execute and, in some cases, stronger. With ample healing numbers and high mobility, she provided a dependability that no other hero could best. Currently, however, Mercy’s viability is at a record low. With a healing per second (hps) reduction, and a less sustainable ultimate called valkyrie (for 15 seconds her core abilities are slightly enhanced), she is no longer reliable at her own role. 

Replay – Sly Cooper And The Thievius Raccoonus

about X hours ago from
Replay – Sly Cooper And The Thievius Raccoonus

Sucker Punch Productions is currently hard at work on Ghost of Tsushima, but fans continue to demand this team make a new Infamous or Sly Cooper game. The studio is a hit maker, and the first title that really took off for it was Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus. Released on September 23, 2002, exclusively on PlayStation 2, Sly Cooper showed us stealth could be used to deliver unique maneuvering methods in a platforming setting. The success of this title brought a string of sequels, an eventual remaster by Sanzaru Games (which we look at today), and a fourth installment by that same studio.

Sly Cooper has his place in the history of games, but the odds of him returning for a fifth installment are slim. Let us know what you think of this series in the comments section below, and be sure to stick around for the second segment which gives us a look at film franchise done up in a way you wouldn't expect.

Replay – Sly Cooper And The Thievius Raccoonus

about X hours ago from
Replay – Sly Cooper And The Thievius Raccoonus

Sucker Punch Productions is currently hard at work on Ghost of Tsushima, but fans continue to demand this team make a new Infamous or Sly Cooper game. The studio is a hit maker, and the first title that really took off for it was Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus. Released on September 23, 2002, exclusively on PlayStation 2, Sly Cooper showed us stealth could be used to deliver unique maneuvering methods in a platforming setting. The success of this title brought a string of sequels, an eventual remaster by Sanzaru Games (which we look at today), and a fourth installment by that same studio.

Sly Cooper has his place in the history of games, but the odds of him returning for a fifth installment are slim. Let us know what you think of this series in the comments section below, and be sure to stick around for the second segment which gives us a look at film franchise done up in a way you wouldn't expect.

My Dad Got Me Into Gaming, Now I’m Repaying The Favor

about X hours ago from
My Dad Got Me Into Gaming, Now I’m Repaying The Favor

I’ll never forget Christmas 1993. All our presents had been opened and while it was a solid year for gifts, it wasn’t more memorable than any other Christmas morning… yet. In true A Christmas Story fashion, my parents “spotted” something behind the couch. They pulled out a large box wrapped in red paper. I didn’t have to open it to know what it was: the Super Nintendo I had been begging for the entire year. I ripped the paper off and gazed upon my new SNES in all its packed-in-Super-Mario-World glory. I had played NES games at friends’ and relatives’ houses to that point, but my home gaming was limited to Avoid the Noid or Wheel of Fortune on the family computer. This not only gave me some much-needed entertainment, but it changed the course of my life. I dove headfirst into the world of gaming and never looked back.

In 2015, I wrote about how gaming has shaped my life over the years. A major part of that was how it allowed me to bond with my father. He traveled on a near-weekly basis for work, so while my weekday evenings were often for homework, the moment he walked in the door on Thursday or Friday night, I couldn’t wait to hand him the second controller.

My Dad Got Me Into Gaming, Now I’m Repaying The Favor

about X hours ago from
My Dad Got Me Into Gaming, Now I’m Repaying The Favor

I’ll never forget Christmas 1993. All our presents had been opened and while it was a solid year for gifts, it wasn’t more memorable than any other Christmas morning… yet. In true A Christmas Story fashion, my parents “spotted” something behind the couch. They pulled out a large box wrapped in red paper. I didn’t have to open it to know what it was: the Super Nintendo I had been begging for the entire year. I ripped the paper off and gazed upon my new SNES in all its packed-in-Super-Mario-World glory. I had played NES games at friends’ and relatives’ houses to that point, but my home gaming was limited to Avoid the Noid or Wheel of Fortune on the family computer. This not only gave me some much-needed entertainment, but it changed the course of my life. I dove headfirst into the world of gaming and never looked back.

In 2015, I wrote about how gaming has shaped my life over the years. A major part of that was how it allowed me to bond with my father. He traveled on a near-weekly basis for work, so while my weekday evenings were often for homework, the moment he walked in the door on Thursday or Friday night, I couldn’t wait to hand him the second controller.

10 Ways Wargroove Changes The Way You Play Advance Wars

about X hours ago from
10 Ways Wargroove Changes The Way You Play Advance Wars

Wargroove is a fantastic game that borrows heavily from the Advance Wars milieu, filling the void that series’ absence has left behind in fans’ hearts (like mine). But for as similar as Chucklefish’s latest game might hew to its inspiration, it makes a number of smart, significant changes that are mostly for the better, giving players more to think about when making their next move.

Here are the biggest ways the two games’ battles differ, with accompanying tips on how to use them to your advantage. For a deep dive on what else Wargroove has to offer that Advance Wars doesn’t, check out or episode of New Gameplay Today.

By far the biggest, most nuanced change Wargroove makes to its inspiration’s gameplay are critical hits. While the name “critical hit” can imply a degree of randomness, it’s anything but: Essentially, they allow you to squeeze extra damage out of every unit (save for passive transport units) if you move them in the right place at the right time. Regular soldiers are stronger when attacking near their commander, the adorable little battlepups are extra vicious if the unit they’re attacking is next to another allied doggo, and dragons deal extra when attack units on open roads.

10 Ways Wargroove Changes The Way You Play Advance Wars

about X hours ago from
10 Ways Wargroove Changes The Way You Play Advance Wars

Wargroove is a fantastic game that borrows heavily from the Advance Wars milieu, filling the void that series’ absence has left behind in fans’ hearts (like mine). But for as similar as Chucklefish’s latest game might hew to its inspiration, it makes a number of smart, significant changes that are mostly for the better, giving players more to think about when making their next move.

Here are the biggest ways the two games’ battles differ, with accompanying tips on how to use them to your advantage. For a deep dive on what else Wargroove has to offer that Advance Wars doesn’t, check out or episode of New Gameplay Today.

By far the biggest, most nuanced change Wargroove makes to its inspiration’s gameplay are critical hits. While the name “critical hit” can imply a degree of randomness, it’s anything but: Essentially, they allow you to squeeze extra damage out of every unit (save for passive transport units) if you move them in the right place at the right time. Regular soldiers are stronger when attacking near their commander, the adorable little battlepups are extra vicious if the unit they’re attacking is next to another allied doggo, and dragons deal extra when attack units on open roads.

How To Play Red Dead Redemption II Like A Professional

about X hours ago from
How To Play Red Dead Redemption II Like A Professional

There's no question that Red Dead Redemption II was the biggest and bestest game of 2018, as evidenced by its sweeping wins in G.I.'s illustrious Not 50 Awards. However, just because the game is undeniably great doesn't mean that everyone is great at playing it. The Wild West is a dangerous and unforgiving place, after all, and if you don't know what you're doing, you'll quickly find yourself in trouble. In fact, even if you think you know what you're doing, you probably still don't and are totally blowing it one way or another.

Luckily for you, my job as a professional gamer means my skills are vastly superior to yours, and I'm more than happy to point out all your flaws with ruthless honesty. I've been performing this invaluable service for the gaming community for years here at G.I., enlightening readers on how to properly play everything from Prey to Metal Gear Solid V to Dark Souls II to GTA V to Tomb Raider to The Last of Us to the worst Borderlands to Far Cry 3 to Skyrim to...actually I think that's it. What was I talking about? Oh yeah, I'm really good at games, guys!

How To Play Red Dead Redemption II Like A Professional

about X hours ago from
How To Play Red Dead Redemption II Like A Professional

There's no question that Red Dead Redemption II was the biggest and bestest game of 2018, as evidenced by its sweeping wins in G.I.'s illustrious Not 50 Awards. However, just because the game is undeniably great doesn't mean that everyone is great at playing it. The Wild West is a dangerous and unforgiving place, after all, and if you don't know what you're doing, you'll quickly find yourself in trouble. In fact, even if you think you know what you're doing, you probably still don't and are totally blowing it one way or another.

Luckily for you, my job as a professional gamer means my skills are vastly superior to yours, and I'm more than happy to point out all your flaws with ruthless honesty. I've been performing this invaluable service for the gaming community for years here at G.I., enlightening readers on how to properly play everything from Prey to Metal Gear Solid V to Dark Souls II to GTA V to Tomb Raider to The Last of Us to the worst Borderlands to Far Cry 3 to Skyrim to...actually I think that's it. What was I talking about? Oh yeah, I'm really good at games, guys!

The Coolest Pokémon Sun And Moon – Team Up Cards We Pulled From Booster Packs

about X hours ago from
The Coolest Pokémon Sun And Moon – Team Up Cards We Pulled From Booster Packs

The Pokémon Trading Card Game took a couple of months off (the last expansion hit in early November), but February signals the release of the first new set of 2019. Team Up not only adds various monster and trainer cards to the ever-growing catalog, but it introduces the new Tag Team Pokémon-GX mechanic (you can read more about this new mechanic here). This new style of card puts two popular Pocket Monsters on one ultra-powerful card for a high-risk/high-reward scenario.

The new expansion introduces more than 180 new cards, including 6 Tag Team pairings. The Pokémon Company sent us a ton of booster packs, both themed decks (Relentless Flame starring Charizard and Torrential Cannon starring Blastoise), and the Towering Splash GX box featuring a special Magikarp & Wailord GX Tag Team card.

From the cards I pulled, I noticed a strong emphasis on the first generation of Pokémon, though when I lined them up, all generations were represented through at least a few monsters. I'm pleasantly surprised by the Tag Team-GX cards I pulled, as the pairings are fun and sometimes unexpected, and their rare nature made them special each time I pulled one from a pack.