RPG Grind Time – SNES Classics I'd Love To See Remade

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RPG Grind Time – SNES Classics I'd Love To See Remade

It’s no secret that the 16-bit era was influential in shaping me as an RPG fan, especially games on the SNES. Secret of Mana ranks highly on my Best-RPGs-of-All-Time list. It was one of the first games that affected me with its storytelling, and I’ll always share a special bond with my grandpa over playing it. That’s why I couldn’t be more excited for a remake. I know a lot of fans have trepidation with remakes. What if they don’t capture the essence of the original, or make changes for the worse? Those are valid concerns, but I enjoy being able to experience my favorite games with a fresh coat of paint and some tweaks, especially as technology continues to improve. It also allows a younger generation who missed out on the originals a chance to experience these classics – often with refinements that make them more user-friendly. With the Secret of Mana remake official, it got me thinking of other SNES RPGs I’d love to get the same treatment. Here are my top three.

See How Much Borderlands Changed By Reading Our Original 2007 Cover Story

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See How Much Borderlands Changed By Reading Our Original 2007 Cover Story

10 years ago to the day, Gearbox and G.I. teamed up to reveal the developer's RPG shooter hit, Borderlands. Join us for a look back at our original story, complete with an updated cover from Gearbox.

A lot about Borderlands changed between our initial 10-page cover story reveal and the final release, to the point where you might not even recognize the game from our 2007 cover. Borderlands' most obvious and oft-discussed transformation was the art style, but a lot of other elements that former G.I. editor Bryan Vore discussed in the original cover story changed as well, from A.I. characters that you could customize and command, to procedurally generated loot caves. Brick, the punch-happy melee character, hadn't even been planned yet, and Roland and Lilith went through some major design changes as well (interestingly enough, Mordecai remained almost exactly the same).

What didn't change, however, was the core concept of Borderlands: mashing up the intense, fast-paced action of the first-person-shooter genre with the endless loot and progression of RPGs. The story spells out what that experience would and wouldn't entail – a reminder that the now commonplace "shooter RPG" subgenre wasn't really a thing back then.

Unboxing The Destiny 2 Collector’s Edition

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Unboxing The Destiny 2 Collector’s Edition

Along with the surprise opening of the Destiny 2 servers, we’re finally getting our own hands-on chance to check out the collector’s edition of the game. Like the digital deluxe version, the collector’s edition includes several in-game bonuses, including eventual access to the first and second expansion to Destiny 2, access to a legendary sword, a legendary emote, and a Cabal Empire-themed emblem. 

In addition, the collector’s edition (which retails for $249.99, if you can manage to track down a copy) includes several physical items to help fill out your Destiny collection.

The outer slipcase and main box look great, with start black exterior housing all the embedded items. Everything fits well in its own spot, which should appeal to fans who have a thing for organization.

11 Spoiler-Free Things You Should Know Before Starting Destiny 2

about X hours ago from
11 Spoiler-Free Things You Should Know Before Starting Destiny 2

The game hasn’t even technically released, but we’ve already spent more than 20 hours exploring Bungie’s universe in Destiny 2. We walked away impressed. Here are some of the things we learned during our hands-on time you might want to know if you’re still on the fence about purchasing this massive time-sink.

1) Destiny is still one of the best console shooters – Bungie has always excelled at delivering a mechanically solid shooter.

2) The music is also still great – The music in the first Destiny was iconic, and dare I say, the music for Destiny 2 might actually be better.

Introducing You To the Next Generation Of Monsters Coming To Pokémon Go

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Introducing You To the Next Generation Of Monsters Coming To Pokémon Go

We're still waiting for Mewtwo to show his face in Pokémon Go (and for the game to stop crashing), but developer Niantic continues to work on its popular, augmented reality monster hunter. A recent patch improved the game’s raid system as well as the Pokémon Go Plus accessory functionality. However, a group of dedicated dataminers have uncovered hidden files that reveal Niantic is working on adding the third generation of Pokémon into the game.

Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire released in the U.S. in 2003 for the GBA, and introduced fans to 135 adorable new Pokémon. They definitely aren’t as iconic as many of the pocket monsters from the first generation, but some of them are pretty cool looking in their own right (I'm not talking about Probopass). Almost all of the 135 new Pokémon have no relation to either of the previous generations (excerpt for for Azurill and Wynaut), which gives this generation a unique feel. However, Gen III helped balance out the Pokémon types overall, as it significantly increased the amount of Dark and Steel Pokémon and introduced a lot of new Pokémon with dual types.

Metroid: Samus Returns Is A Remake That Feels Original

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Metroid: Samus Returns Is A Remake That Feels Original

Metroid II: Return of Samus is considered the black sheep of the Metroid franchise. First released on the Game Boy in August of 1991, this little handheld’s cartridges held six-times less memory than its NES predecessor, which meant Nintendo needed to make several compromises to the game’s design. One of the most noticeable concessions was Metroid’s alien landscapes, which were drained of their color and much of their mood, thanks to the Game Boy’s green LCD display. The handheld’s limited pixels also meant Nintendo needed to zoom in on the action. Samus took up a large portion of the screen’s real estate, leaving players feeling cramped. Moreover, Samus’ overall mission to destroy a set number of Metroids across the alien world of SR388 led to a linear design, which was antithetical to the series’ core concept of rewarding exploration.

Madden 18's Longshot Made Me Care About Football

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Madden 18's Longshot Made Me Care About Football

I never really understood much about football growing up. I played soccer with my cousins and at school, had a basketball hoop in the driveway of my house for a few years, and was cajoled into playing for a little league baseball team. I played NBA Jam, a couple of Nintendo 64-era FIFA titles, and the Super Nintendo classic Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League Baseball. I wouldn’t say I ever fell in love with the sports, but over the years I was able to learn enough about them to enjoy them at a distance. That never happened with football.

When EA showed off a trailer for Madden 18’s story mode, The Longshot, however, I was intrigued. For more detailed breakdown of the story-based mode you can read Matthew Kato’s preview of it from a few months ago. The short of it, however, is that you watch a story play out, make dialogue choices, press some buttons at the right time, and play a little bit of Madden.

Should Diablo Fans Bother With Path Of Exile On Xbox One?

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Should Diablo Fans Bother With Path Of Exile On Xbox One?

I’ve spent more time than I’d care to admit playing the PS4 version of Diablo III. It’s been one of my go-to games since it was first released, and it’s one of my favorite things to play while I catch up on podcasts or just need a palate cleanser between other releases. Path of Exile was officially released on Xbox One a few weeks ago, and I was curious to see how Grinding Gear Games’ action-RPG fared compared to one of my all-time favorites. The answer? It’s good – really, really good, in fact.

We’ve already reviewed the PC version and some of its expanded content, so I’m not going to be assigning a number to any of my thoughts. I haven’t played enough of it at this point, anyway. Instead, I just wanted to share my thoughts on the game from a specific perspective: someone who loves playing Diablo III on console (I know, I know) and hasn’t been particularly impressed with most of the dungeon-crawling experiences on those platforms. With that in mind, here are some of the highs and lows that I’ve noticed so far.