Replay – Diablo

about X hours ago from
Replay – Diablo

With news of Diablo III heading to Switch, we decided to look back at the game that started it all...on PlayStation. We figure this clunky console port is the best way for people to see just how old the Diablo series is. You'll quickly learn that it's super old. Like "are we looking at a wall or door?" kind of old.

Diablo originally released on PC on December 31, 1996, and many of the hallmark features we turn to this series for today were in that original version. Jeff Cork joins me for a co-op session, and we make a decent amount of progress before disaster sinks in. Turns out, Cork should not be trusted with a bow and arrow.

We also dive into a number of NES games for a variety of quick looks. Enjoy the episode, and come back for a new one in seven days!

15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

about X hours ago from
15 Random Tidbits About Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

All throughout August, we’re updating our site with information about the game on our latest cover, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. In addition to the 14-page print feature that subscribers can read, we’ve had in-depth features on mercenaries, a look at some of the gameplay loops you can participate in, and a blast of rapid-fire questions with the game’s director. Not everything we learn during our studio visit fits neatly into a larger feature, though. Rather than leave those little tidbits in the shadows, we’ve compiled some of the most interesting nuggets and are sharing them with you.

1. You’re going to get to know the historian Herodotus over the course of your journey. “Herodotus goes along with you on the main path for a while, and then he ends up on your ship and stays with you,” says Scott Phillips, game director of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. Hold up. Who’s Herodotus again? “He is well known for recording the events of the wars and going around to different cultures so we have a better idea of who the Greeks were and how they lived and beyond,” says narrative director Melissa MacCoubrey. “He is very good at chronicling those. And then he has an entry about giant ants that mine gold.” Herodotus will even record your adventures, though it remains to be seen where they land on the spectrum between history and giant ants.  

The Top 10 Games On Switch

about X hours ago from
 The Top 10 Games On Switch

Compared to Nintendo's previous console generation (and most generations, frankly), the Switch has come out of the gate incredibly strong. It's only been on the market for a relatively short time, but it already has a solid library of games with plenty worth recommending. For our 10 absolute favorite games, however, you can check out the list below. It's a list we will be updating as often as games worthy of inclusion release. We will kick games off and add new ones as the Switch's library grows.

Please note that while the list below contains 10 entries, we aren’t actually ranking them – if a game has made it this far (and managed to stay here), it’s a must-play, period. As such, we’ll be listing entries in chronological order. Also, you’ll find rundown of previous entries at the bottom of the list. While those titles have gotten bumped for bigger and better experiences, they are still all great games in their own right and worth exploring if you’re already caught up on the latest hits.

Here are Game Informer’s picks for the top 10 games on the Switch.

Let's Talk About Why Gaming Rituals And Routines Are Important

about X hours ago from
Let's Talk About Why Gaming Rituals And Routines Are Important

Getting a job in games journalism was an interesting experience in that it meant that one of my biggest hobbies, timesinks, and forms of escapism had suddenly become a 9-to-5 job. I had worked as a full-time freelancer for a couple of years and that was pretty labor intensive, but there was still notion in my head that I was just someone who played games and happened to get paid to write about them.

Moving to a new place and having a desk in an office where I sat and wrote about video games shifted my mental landscape in ways good and bad that we don’t necessarily need to go over here in detail. However, the key point is that this amorphous, shifting element that had been a focal point in my life was now firmly entrenched in the professional.

A while ago, I ditched playing games as the thing that I use to blow of steam, dedicating too much of my time to games. I told myself I’d only play games for work reasons and find other things to do in my free time. I worked on a visual novel I’m making with some pals,  and I started climbing for exercise, watching a bunch of classic movies, and reading novels daily. I was filling in my life with non-gaming hobbies.

I Played All Of Shrek In Beat Saber, And It Nearly Killed Me

about X hours ago from
I Played All Of Shrek In Beat Saber, And It Nearly Killed Me

Beat Saber, the Early Access VR rhythm game about slicing through colored blocks with lightsabers, has quickly grown a huge modding community that is making custom tracks for the game. Most of these tracks are exactly what you would expect: playable versions of popular songs that the dev has not yet licensed. Next to those songs, however, is a collection of bizarre playable audio files, like the GameCube startup noise or Obi-Wan Kenobi yelling “I have the high ground.” But arguably the crowning achievement of this weird subset of tracks is this week’s new release: Shrek. And when I say “Shrek,” I don’t mean the film’s soundtrack, I mean Shrek, the full movie. Dialogue, music, moments of silence, that scene where Shrek makes a joke about Lord Farquaad compensating for something – someone tracked the full film’s audio into one 83-minute long, 10,000+ note playable track.

And I played it.

I Played All Of Shrek In Beat Saber, And It Nearly Killed Me

about X hours ago from
I Played All Of Shrek In Beat Saber, And It Nearly Killed Me

Beat Saber, the Early Access VR rhythm game about slicing through colored blocks with lightsabers, has quickly grown a huge modding community that is making custom tracks for the game. Most of these tracks are exactly what you would expect: playable versions of popular songs that the dev has not yet licensed. Next to those songs, however, is a collection of bizarre playable audio files, like the GameCube startup noise or Obi-Wan Kenobi yelling “I have the high ground.” But arguably the crowning achievement of this weird subset of tracks is this week’s new release: Shrek. And when I say “Shrek,” I don’t mean the film’s soundtrack, I mean Shrek, the full movie. Dialogue, music, moments of silence, that scene where Shrek makes a joke about Lord Farquaad compensating for something – someone tracked the full film’s audio into one 83-minute long, 10,000+ note playable track.

And I played it.

All The Characters, Stages, And Pokémon Confirmed For Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

about X hours ago from
All The Characters, Stages, And Pokémon Confirmed For Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is poised to be one of this holiday season's biggest releases. When the Switch entry in the long-running franchise was unveiled at E3 2018, fans were shocked to learn about the scope of the new title; not only was the Smash team adding a few new characters and stages, but also including every character and a huge percentage of the stages that have ever appeared in the series in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

With more than 70 characters and 100 stages currently announced for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, we decided to gather them all in one place and organize them by franchise. In addition, we've scoured footage from the several times Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has been shown to compile a list of Pokémon appearing both in Poké Balls and the Pokémon-themed stages.

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate not only includes every playable character from the series' past entries, but also a handful of new characters. If you're curious as to whether your favorite gaming icon is confirmed for the upcoming Super Smash Bros. title for Switch, check out our list, organized by franchise of origin, below.

All The Characters, Stages, And Pokémon Confirmed For Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

about X hours ago from
All The Characters, Stages, And Pokémon Confirmed For Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is poised to be one of this holiday season's biggest releases. When the Switch entry in the long-running franchise was unveiled at E3 2018, fans were shocked to learn about the scope of the new title; not only was the Smash team adding a few new characters and stages, but also including every character and a huge percentage of the stages that have ever appeared in the series in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

With more than 70 characters and 100 stages currently announced for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, we decided to gather them all in one place and organize them by franchise. In addition, we've scoured footage from the several times Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has been shown to compile a list of Pokémon appearing both in Poké Balls and the Pokémon-themed stages.

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate not only includes every playable character from the series' past entries, but also a handful of new characters. If you're curious as to whether your favorite gaming icon is confirmed for the upcoming Super Smash Bros. title for Switch, check out our list, organized by franchise of origin, below.

A Look Inside How Blizzard Maintains World Of Warcraft's Lore

about X hours ago from
A Look Inside How Blizzard Maintains World Of Warcraft's Lore

BlizzCon 2010 lives in infamy inside the walls of Blizzard. It’s the moment Ian Bates – “Red Shirt Guy” in World of Warcraft circles – sent the development team back to school.

Taking the microphone in a packed hall, Bates asked a question so unexpected, so specific that it stumped the assembled experts on the convention’s lore panel. His stilted, monotone delivery (which he later attributed to both nerves and a mild case of Asperger’s) led to the video of his cross-examination going viral.

“Hello, I have I just finished reading The Shattering [a 2010 Warcraft novel] yesterday, and I noticed something,” he began. “It said that Falstad Wildhammer was going to be on the Council of Three Hammers. But in the beta it’s Kurdran Wildhammer, and Falstad is not in the game at all. What happened to him?”

What We Want From The Future Of Diablo

about X hours ago from
What We Want From The Future Of Diablo

When Diablo III launched in 2012, it was plagued with issues, including server problems, an in-game auction house, a stingy legendary drop-rate, and no real endgame other than repeating the same short campaign. Fans were unhappy, despite the game receiving critical acclaim.

It wasn’t until 2014, with the release of the first and only expansion, Reaper of Souls, that Blizzard made major changes to Diablo III. The loot and paragon system was completely reworked, the endgame was improved, and a fifth act was added as well as the new crusader class. Game Informer said it was “one of the most significant turnarounds in gaming” and praised the myriad changes Blizzard brought. They have been dedicated to updating Diablo frequently since the expansion and the developer has delivered a steady stream of seasonal updates that add new challenges and loot. On top of this the popular Necromancer class from Diablo II returned and Blizzard rebuilt the first 16 levels of the original game within Diablo III for a limited time anniversary event.