Meet the Fallout 76 player behind the Deathclaw maze, player oven and murder church

about X hours ago from
Meet the Fallout 76 player behind the Deathclaw maze, player oven and murder church

If you've been on the Fallout 76 subreddit over the past few months, you've probably seen them. Huge, grandiose and utterly outrageous; these are player traps which seem to hoodwink dozens despite their sinister facades.

They're the work of Vault101manguy, also known as Mike: a Canadian Fallout 76 player who by day works in IT, but at night terrifies the citizens of Flatwoods. So far he's created three traps, including a murder church, player oven and his latest masterpiece: a Deathclaw maze.

The posts have gained significant traction on Reddit, even inviting comment from a Bethesda dev, and Mike has plans to make even more traps in future. I had a chat with Mike to ask him a bit about his work and the process behind constructing the devices. Oh - and how he got that Deathclaw into the maze.

Portal, Left 4 Dead writer Chet Faliszek co-founds new co-op games studio

about X hours ago from
Portal, Left 4 Dead writer Chet Faliszek co-founds new co-op games studio

Former Valve writer Chet Faliszek has co-founded new games studio Stray Bombay with Riot Games designer Kimberly Voll.

Faliszek is best known for his work on Valve classics such as Half-Life 2's episodes, Portal, Left 4 Dead and Portal 2 - several of which have a big focus on co-operative storytelling.

And it's this focus Stray Bombay will build upon as Faliszek and Voll seek to make games with shared experiences.

Bethesda's doing E3 this year

about X hours ago from
Bethesda's doing E3 this year

Bethesda will have a media briefing at E3 2019, it's announced.

The company's E3 showcase is set for Monday, 10th June at 1.30am UK time. It'll be a late one!

So, what do we expect? Bethesda has said Doom Eternal will get an in-depth look, so that's guaranteed. But what else? How about something from Arkane, the developer of Dishonored and Prey, more on Wolfenstein: Youngblood, a big expansion for Fallout 76 and another glimpse at Bethesda Game Studio's Starfield?

Nintendo Switch version of Startropics impossible to complete without secret code

about X hours ago from
Nintendo Switch version of Startropics impossible to complete without secret code

NES classic Startropics famously included a secret code hidden within its paper manual - one you need to enter to complete the game.

Unfortunately, as Reddit users have realised, the recently-released Nintendo Switch version of Startropics does not include it.

It feels like an oversight on Nintendo's part, after the Wii U Virtual Console port of the game included the code in its digital manual.

Get a PSVR set for just over £200

about X hours ago from
Get a PSVR set for just over £200

You can pick up the latest PlayStation VR starter pack (2018 model) and experience mighty VR-O-Vision for a significantly reduced £209 at Amazon - saving you up to £80 on the price compared to the likes of Argos, Currys, AO and Very.

The set includes a headset, PlayStation Camera and a copy of PlayStation VR Worlds, the latter of which features five mini-experiences ranging from an ocean descent to a Danny Dyer-esque heist.

Meanwhile, the same set with a copy of Resident Evil VR and Now TV can be snagged for £239.99 at GAME.

Nintendo Switch adult Mahjong game pulled due to poor censorship

about X hours ago from
Nintendo Switch adult Mahjong game pulled due to poor censorship

A Nintendo Switch version of Mahjong, the ancient Chinese game about removing tiles, has been pulled from the Japanese eShop for containing poorly-censored nudity.

Super Real Mahjong PV originally launched on the Sega Saturn, and was designed to titillate players with 32-bit hentai as a reward for completing levels. Super real, it was not.

Back to 2019, where the game's eyebrow-raising reappearance on Switch in Japan includes a lazy attempt to cover up its characters. Light beams now censor parts of each image - making it look like you're staring at Microsoft Paint drawings of women in Japanese schoolgirl costumes, while someone shines a torch into your eyes to ask what on earth you think you're doing.

Tom Clancy's The Division 2 review - an accomplished sequel with an awful story

about X hours ago from
Tom Clancy's The Division 2 review - an accomplished sequel with an awful story

There are a few things you can count on me to be embarrassed by on any given day - my beer gut, for example, or the time I called my teacher 'mum' when I was six. One of the things embarrassing me most at the moment is how much I like The Division 2, because it is a game that manages to be both great and repugnant.

Let's start with the good stuff - The Division 2 is a very well made cover shooter. The core experience introduced in the first game is still gripping, offering countless busy set pieces with just enough of a challenge to make its players feel like part of a well oiled machine.

The Division 2 physical launch sales just 20% of Division 1's

about X hours ago from
The Division 2 physical launch sales just 20% of Division 1's

The Division 2 sold far fewer physical copies during its launch week than the series' first entry, back in 2016.

Ubisoft's latest Tom Clancy-'em-up shifted just 20 per cent of the boxed copies of its predecessor. As ever, UK numbers do not include digital sales.

So why the huge plummet? Well, Division 1 launched on a Tuesday in the UK, compared to Division 2's Friday arrival. The first game had a little longer to rack up numbers.

Glorious pixel physics rule in Noita

about X hours ago from
Glorious pixel physics rule in Noita

If this is mud that's falling from the cavern above, having pooled in divots and then lapped and slopped over the edges, then why does it settle on top of the water in this beautiful subterranean lake? And why is that guy with flames for hands and feet and flames for a head walking towards me?

Oh, it's not mud at all. It must be oil. Because now everything is ablaze, fire arcing over the surface of the lake, boiling the lake dry, racing upwards to the cavern above and the overflowing divots. Now I'm on fire. Now the ground's giving way. Now I'm landing in fresh green water. Except it's acid rather than water. At least I'm not on fire anymore!

At least I'm not on fire anymore. Noita - I think it's a Finnish word for 'witch' - is the kind of game that has you counting your blessings, however small. It's a 2D procedural exploration game in which you play a robed adventurer heading deep underground with a bundle of magic wands for company. You can aim in any direction and you can levitate for a bit and you can kick things around if they're light enough. Secrets and enemies lurk all about.

Here's what Star Wars Dark Forces looks like remade in Unreal Engine 4

about X hours ago from
Here's what Star Wars Dark Forces looks like remade in Unreal Engine 4

A developer from Obsidian is remaking Star Wars Dark Forces in Unreal Engine 4.

Jason Lewis - who works as a professional senior environment artist at Obsidian - has been working on this passion project for a few years now, starting out with plans to simply recreate A New Hope's Mos Eisley spaceport as a Dark Forces "art project". Now, however, the project has expanded to a fan-made recreation of Dark Forces, complete with a newly released playable work-in-progress demo.

If you're too young to remember it the first time around (i.e. you're not as old as I am), Star Wars: Dark Forces was a 1995 first-person shooter developed by Lucasarts. Sadly, this remake doesn't feature any shootable bad dudes, but you can experiment with the blaster, take a tour of the Millennium Falcon, and spend some quality time with R2-D2.