Nintendo offers a rare sale on downloadable games for E3

about X hours ago from
Nintendo offers a rare sale on downloadable games for E3

In a rare move for the venerable video game company, Nintendo has just put together a sale in honor of E3 on "select digital games" for both its Switch and 3DS consoles. While the company promises up to a 50% discount, you won't find deep discounts on games you probably want, like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for $45 and Splatoon 2 for $40, both of which typically retail for $60. The sale ends June 21st at 8:59 AM PT or 11:59 AM ET.

We watched someone play 'Beyond Good and Evil 2'

about X hours ago from
We watched someone play 'Beyond Good and Evil 2'

Beyond Good and Evil 2 is a game that exists. Or at least, there's something that's playable inside Ubisoft's office. During a behind-closed-doors presentation, some of the team showed off a playable demo on a planet called Soma. It revolved around Ganesha City, the bustling metropolis that featured in last year's cinematic E3 trailer. Two players, working cooperatively, started in an underground temple riddled with mercenaries working for nefarious corporations. The team showed off the basic controls -- you have a sword, gun and some swappable powers, including a time-slowing bubble -- before dispatching their foes in record time.

‘Control’ is a leap of faith for the team behind ‘Alan Wake'

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‘Control’ is a leap of faith for the team behind ‘Alan Wake'

Control isn't what you expect. Rather than the stylized, linear shooters developer Remedy Entertainment is known for, it's a free-form experience that has more in common with Castlevania: Symphony of the Night than it does with Alan Wake. Except, instead of exploring a moody castle, you're scouring the shape-shifting headquarters of a secretive government agency, the Federal Bureau of Control (FBC), which has been infested by an otherworldly presence known as The Hiss.

'Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu!' doesn't feel like a remake

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'Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu!' doesn't feel like a remake

Those of us that have enjoyed the series since Red know an uncomfortable truth: Nintendo doesn't have to do much to sell us on a Pokémon game. Millions of us had formative experiences playing the Gen I titles, and since then we've obediently picked up every game that followed. The series has, of course, evolved over time. Hundreds and hundreds of new Pokémon have joined the fray, along with new mechanics and types. But that's all incidental -- I would still enjoy the core loop of exploring, capturing and battling my way to a new Elite Four, regardless of the effort Nintendo puts in.

Playing 'Jump Force' is like drinking liquid fan service

about X hours ago from
Playing 'Jump Force' is like drinking liquid fan service

Bandai Namco continues to perfect the art of anime video game. Following its well-regarded Naruto Ultimate Storm series and last year's incredible-looking Dragonball FighterZ, it's time to bring all the heroes together. Jump Force, named after the best-selling line of manga magazines in Japan, draws on heroes (and villains) from hugely influential series like One Piece and Dragonball Z and fires it all at planet Earth. Yep, this manga crossover brings giant energy balls, elasticated limbs and ninjitsu to places like New York. Destructive, enjoyable, chaos ensues.

Sony issues non-response to ‘Fortnite’ cross-play woes on Switch

about X hours ago from
Sony issues non-response to ‘Fortnite’ cross-play woes on Switch

Fortnite diehards would have been undoubtedly jubilant at the E3 announcement that the battle royale hit had come to Nintendo Switch. Its arrival was even blessed with the inclusion of native voice-chat. Yes, things were peachy until hopeful players tried logging into their Epic Games account on PlayStation 4, and realized they couldn't use their existing Epic accounts to access the game. Even though Sony wasn't directly involved in Fortnite's Switch launch, the company still had a say over how the game could be played.

'Mega Man 11' is a welcome return for the Blue Bomber

about X hours ago from
'Mega Man 11' is a welcome return for the Blue Bomber

It's been more than eight years since Capcom released Mega Man 10. Do we really need a sequel? Based on a short demo I played, the answer is absolutely yes. Mega Man 11 has everything you would want and expect from the run-and-gun platforming franchise. It's devilishly hard, with fast-moving enemies and environmental hazards that will quickly whittle down your health bar, even on some of the easiest difficulty settings. The game is snappy, though, so I never felt like my many, many deaths were undeserved. I always wanted to get better and delve a little deeper into each stage I tried.