There were so many games at GDC's ID@Xbox showcase

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There were so many games at GDC's ID@Xbox showcase

Microsoft's ID@Xbox showcase is a staple of GDC, packing a ton of independent video games into a single room and letting players go wild. This year, ID@Xbox featured 20 games across a range of genres, from shoot-em-ups and RPGs to first-person cyberpunk horror. It's impossible to play every game, so we picked four at random: Full Metal Furies, Observer, Moonlighter and Ruiner. And we had a blast.

What to expect from the Nintendo Switch's day-one update

about X hours ago from
What to expect from the Nintendo Switch's day-one update

The Nintendo Switch can't do much out of the box. It can play game cards (the system's tiny cartridges), but that's pretty much it. If you're getting a Switch tomorrow, you'll want to make sure you've got internet access to snag its day-one update, which adds support for the eShop, friends list and social network posting. They're all things we couldn't use while reviewing the Switch, so I spent a bit of time with the new features today to see how they actually work.

Survios' 'Sprint Vector' lets your run in VR without getting sick

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Survios' 'Sprint Vector' lets your run in VR without getting sick

Locomotion and speed are two of the hardest problems to solve in virtual reality -- get either one wrong, and players are going to get sick. That's why so many VR experiences use teleportation as their primary movement mechanic. It's a safe, slow ways to let players explore large game worlds. It's become a bit of a standard, but you won't find it anywhere in Survios' next title. Sprint Vector is a fast-paced racing game that lets players sprint through obstacle courses at super-human speeds. The idea balks at the idea of the safe, slow VR environment, but somehow avoids inflicting simulator sickness on the player. The key? Turns out it was making hands the new feet.

Nintendo Switch still uses friend codes for some reason

about X hours ago from
Nintendo Switch still uses friend codes for some reason

As recently as January, we were told that Nintendo's awful friend code system for finding and adding buddies for multiplayer games would be no more. That made us hope a better system for adding Switch contacts was on the way. Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime even told CNET, "There are no friend codes within what we're doing." It turns out that's not true at all, as the company revealed that friend codes are very much alive and well.

Twitter will livestream ESL and DreamHack eSports tournaments

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Twitter will livestream ESL and DreamHack eSports tournaments

Twitter's initial foray into livestreaming eSports must have went well, as it's expanding the range of tournaments it covers in a big way. The social network has reached deals to stream 15-plus ESL One, DreamHack and Intel Extreme Masters tournaments over the course of 2017. ESL will also make its own originals for Twitter, including a half-hour show that covers competition highlights and behind-the-scenes stories. The first tourney to get the treatment is Intel Extreme Masters Katowice, which starts on March 4th.

LG's SteamVR headset is a bulky yet promising HTC Vive alternative

about X hours ago from
LG's SteamVR headset is a bulky yet promising HTC Vive alternative

For the past year, the only two contenders in the PC virtual reality space were the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive. Not anymore. A few days ago, LG announced its own PC-driven VR headset, which was made in collaboration with Valve. That means that there are now two headsets -- the Vive and the LG -- that utilizes Valve's SteamVR tracking technology. We took a closer look at a prototype of the LG headset here at GDC 2017, and though it could certainly use some improvement, we think it has a lot of potential.

'Breath of the Wild' is the best 'Zelda' game in years

about X hours ago from
'Breath of the Wild' is the best 'Zelda' game in years

I replayed the first 30 minutes of Rise of the Tomb Raider the other day. In it, I scaled a mountain, leaping from platform to platform while the environment around me crumbled. I then headed into a tomb, worked through a few puzzles, and triggered a high-octane escape sequence. A year ago, I enjoyed those opening moments immensely. After playing The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, though, they felt lifeless and stale.